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September 14, 1962 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-14

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILI

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1

"FAMILY FEUD":
Review Romney-Birch Battle

MeHargue Resigns Position
To Teach in East Pakistan

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By DAVID MARCUS
The battle lines were drawn last
summer as Michigan Republicans
engaged in a "family feud" cen-
tering around the controversial
conservative group, the John Birch
Society.
Specifically, the storm centered
around Detroit's fourteenth Con-
gressional district where then-ad-
mitted Bircher Richard Durant
was serving as Republican district
vice-chairman. GOP gubernatorial
hopeful George Romney opened
the campaign against Durant ear-
ly last summer by saying that
it is incompatible to be in the
Birch Society and to back Rom-
ney.
Repudiating 'extremism in his
party, he asked Durant to resign
his leadership. Durant refused.
His refusal led to the formation
of the "Republican Action Com-

mittee, a group consisting of
prominent fourteenth district Re-
publicans, including former Sec-
retary of the Army Wilbur Bruck-
er, designed to put up precinct
delegate candidates pledged to
oust Durant.
Although it seemed to many ob-
servers that the Republican Action
Committee had gained control of
the Fourteenth District, the re-
verse proved to be true at the dis-
trict party convention. Durant's
candidate for the post of conven-
tion chairman, Mrs. Lois V. Nair,
easily won. Durant was later re-
elected as the district's vice-chair-
man.
Durant himself pulled the sur-
prise move of the convention by
announcing that he had resigned
from the Birch Society, although
he has since publicly stated that

he still accepts the principles of
the organization.
Romney Speaks
Party officials' reactions to the
Birch Society have varied greatly.
Romney has said,".,. I hold this
belief - that there is no place in
either of our great parties for the
purveyors of hate - those who,
from time to time in nations the
world over put on their brown or
black or red shirts, flex their ty-
rannical muscles and seek to force
the views of a secret cult on oth-
ers."
Romney went on to ask that
there be state legislation allowing
political parties to remove from
office "any so-called leader-state
county, district, precinct or other-
wise -- whose actions have clearly
labeled him unworthy or unfit to
hold his office."
Council Refuses
Contest Request
The Ann Arbor City Council has
rejected the Homecoming Com-
mittee's request for a "Twist
Contest" at the intersection of
East University and South Uni-
versity Avenues. The committee is
still searching for a suitable place
to hold the contest which is sched-
uled for Oct. 26.

By PHILIP SUTIN
Prof. Daniel S. McHargue of the
political science department re-
signed his position to teach at the
University of Dacca, in Dacca,
East Pakistan, causing a number
of shifts in political science de-
partment scheduling of classes.
Resigning as of Sept. 1, Prof.
McHargue joined the University
of Southern California to under-
take his two-year overseas assign-
ment, Prof. Arthur B r o m a g e,
chairman of the political science
department, explained. Prof. Mc-
Hargue's resignation has not yet
been officially accepted by the Re-
gents, Prof. Bromage added.
Prof. McHargue will organize
curriculums and teach courses in
public administration, Prof. Bro-
mage said.
Nothing Sudden
"This is nothing sudden. Prof.
McHargue had expressed interest
in an overseas assignment for
some time and the department
had planned for this contingency,"
he explained.
Prof. John White will replace
Prof. McHargue as the instructor
of the American State Govern-
ment course, Political Scienre 421.
The course, originally scheduled
for 9 a.m. Monday, Wednesday
and Friday, will be given at 3 p.m.
those days. The change was made
because of conflicts in Prof.
White's schedule, Prof. Brumage
explained.

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Prof. Karl Lamb will replace
Prof. White as the lecturer, Lec-
ture B, of Political Science 100.
Cancel Pro-Seminar
Political Science 625, Pro-Sem-
inar in Intergovernment Relations
taught by Prof. McHargue, was
cancelled. Prof. White will teach
Prof. McHargue's Seminar in
tSate and Local Government next
spring.
Other shifts, unrelated to Prof.
McHargue's resignation, include
the cancellation of Political Sci-
ence 744 and 755, Seminars in
Government and Politics of the
Soviet Bloc, to be taught by Prof.
George Ballis, and Government
and Politics of the Far East.
Prof. Charles M. Rhemus, a new
member of the department's fac-
ulty, will teach Political Science
629, Pro-Seminar in American
National Administration, a new
course.
Switch Seminar Schedule
Two seminars' times were
changed. Political Science 631, Ad-
ministration Organization and
Management, will meet 2-4 p.m.
Wednesdays. Political Science 633,
Public Personnel Administration,
will meet 2-4 p.m. Fridays.
In addition to McHargue's res-
ignation, instructor Simon Perry
left the faculty, Prof. Brumage
said. George Beam has been added
to the faculty as an instructor..
"The political science depart-
ment is going into the year with
a good situation. It carried over
most of the staff from last year.
In view of the outside offer to
many of the faculty, it is happy
and fortunate to have the staff
in tact," Prof. Brumage declared.
He noted that several faculty
members received "handsome of-
fers," but were persuaded to stay.
Rev. IDobyns
Accepts Post
At Foundtion
The Reverend Lester L. Dobyns
will assume the Episcopal Chap-
laincy of the University this fall.
Taking over for the Reverend
Edward Roth, who has moved to
East Lansing, the Rev. Mr. Do-
byns will direct the activities of
the Episcopal Student Foundation,
centered in CanterburyHouse at
218 N. Division Street.
The Rev. Mr. Dobyns started his
career as a musician, graduating
from Columbia University with a
master's degree in music. After
working several years as a music
teacher, he entered Virginia The-
ological Seminary and in 1955 was
ordained to the Episcopal priest-
hood.
For one year, the Rev. Mr. Do-
byns served as Protestant Chap-
lain at Pennsylvania State Univer-
sity and for five years was asso-
ciate rector at Christ Church,
Cranbrook, Bloomfield Hills. He
will continue in his most as direc-
tor of college work for the Dio-
cese of Michigan on a part-time
basis while undertaking his new
duties in Ann Arbor.

Calling All Co-Ed

WELCOME to the CHURCHES
of ANN ARBOR

PROF. CHARLES F. LEHMANN
. ..improved educators
"1
View Needs
Of Faculty
(Continued from Page 1)
chief factor in promotions among
lower-ranking staff members was
students' corridor gossip picked up
by the school's administrative
staff," Prof. Lehmann added.
Formal Report
The formal report, entitled
"Evaluation of Instruction and Its
Relation to Promotion" states that
the committee attempted to dis-
cover how frequently quality in
teaching was used as a criterion
for faculty promotion, in com-
parison with certain other criteria,
such as research and writing, pro-
fessional activities, administrative
services, extra-mural services, per-
sonal qualities, and the offer of
positions at other institutions of
higher education.
In preparing the report, a ques-
tionnaire, containing specific com-
parative questions was sent to
deans and department chairmen.
Certain of the questions on the
form concerned methods of evalu-
ation, frequency of evaluation, and
how such information was used by
the school or department.
From these forms the group
learned that deans and depart-
ment heads thought that most
promotions made between 1959-61
were based largely both on quality
of teaching and on research and
writing. Other criteria had been
used, but not as extensively.
Student Opinions
The general way the deans as-
certained quality ofhstaff mem-
bers was through .informal stu-
dent opinion, and informal opin-
ion of faculty colleagues, rather
than through formal student opin-
ion like the evaluations the literary
college has students fill out every
three semesters.
In the literary college, promo-
tion from the rank of lecturer or
instructor to a high position de-
pended more upon teaching qual-
ifications-and evaluations-than
upon any other criteria. However,
once the assistant professorsnip
had been gained, the department
chairmen indicated that they re-
garded research and writing to
be equally or more important than
teaching ability.
In professional schools teaching
was in almost all cases the prime
requisite for promotion, and in
some cases research and writing
barely figured into rewards.

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Fashion Showing,
Sat., Sept.15
1-4 P.M. Informal Modeling of exciting
fall clothes that will be perfect for all
those important college events 1 I
Lanz originals
are sold in
Ann Arbor
Only at
COLINS
Color counterpoint
in all wool flannel
with bodice banding
and belt to match
the skirt. Red bodice
with charcoal skirt.
39.95
Jr. Sizes

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
University Student Class.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
WEDNESDAY-
8:00 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
2145 Independence Blvd., near Manchester
Road (south of Howard Johnson's)
Richard E. Crusius, Pastor, NO 5-5819
9:30 a.m. Church School. Classes for all
1 1 :00 a.m. Worship Service
The United Church of Christ-a union of the
Congregational Christian and Evangelical,
and Reformed Churches
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

10:00
11:00
6:30

a.m.
a.m.
p.m.

Bible School
Regular Worship
Evening Worship

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY

SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion
for Students.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Alexander Brunett
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Mosses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses 7:00, 8:00, 9;00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help.
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Weekly classes in the Fundamentals of the
Catholic Faith Tuesday and Thursday at
10 A.M., 2, 3, 8 P.M. Foundations of
Christianity Tuesday and Thursday at 11
A.M., 1, 3, 7 P.M. Secret Scripture Mon-
day at 8:00. Medical Ethics Thursday at
7:00. Nursing Ethics Monday at 8:00.
Newman Classes Friday at 8:00. Open
Forum Wednesday at 8:00.
SPECIAL EVENTS FOR FRESHMEN
AND NEW STUDENTS
Friday, Sept. 14, 7:00 P.M.-Registration in
the Newman Club. Explanation of U. of M.
Newman Club, followed by special party,
dancing and refreshments until midnight.
Prof. G. B. Harrison will speak on "Catho-
lics and the Secular Campus."
Sunday, Sept. 16, 9:30 Mass. Installation of
Officers followed by a special breakfast
for all new students (free).
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
Phone NO 8-7622
Anna M. Lee, Pastor's Assistant
Friday, September 14th, 5:30 P.M.
Open House and Supper for new students
Sunday, September 16th
9:30 a.m. Church Worship
10:00 a.m. Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Church Worship
7:00 p.m. Lutheran Student Association
Meeting in the Student Lounge.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway
Pastor: Rev. Alvin Hoksbergen
Morning Worship: 10:30
Univ. Bible Class: 9:30
Evening Worship: 5:00
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services
of All-Student Congregation.
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Supper and Program of Gamma
Delta Lutheran Student Club.
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Ray and Nancy McNair, House Directors
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Sunday School, Adult Discussion
11:00 a.m. Meeting for Worship
Young Friends 'and Student Discussion-to be
announced
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Worship Services: 9:30 and 11:00 a.m. (be-
ginning Sept. 9)
Church School: Crib through 12th grade; 9:30
and 11 :00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe; always open; You
are welcome!
Friday, Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m. Dinner, new stu-
dents guests at Congregational Church.
Sunday, Sept. 16, 7:00 p.m. Open House.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. PaulW. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY-
Coffee Hour.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
.SUNDAY EVENING-
6:45 to 8:00 - -American Baptist Student
Fellowship; worship, discussion, and
fellowship.
Monday Noon Luncheon Discussions.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets. Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister.
M. Jean Robe and Tony Stoneburner,
Campus ministers.
SEPTEMBER 17, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
7:00 P.M. Wesley Lounge. "Initiation in the
University and in the Church."

I

U

WEEJ UNS*

and Sermon

,I

11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
9:30 Guild House at 802 Monroe
9:30 Study Seminar at Guild House
10:45 Worship
Friday, Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m. Dinner, new stu-
dents guests at Congregational Church
Sunday, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m. Open House

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this week.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Gaede
Adult Discussion 10:00 a.m.
Church Service 11:00 a.m.
Church school and identical services at 9:30
and 11:00

I

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