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September 14, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRTnAY PTi~MflFfl~ 1&~ 1!~

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INTERNATIONAL DRAMA:
Players Offer Varied Season

Musket To Give Musical
Based on Johnson Farce

TO STAR EVA LE GALLIENNE:.
APA Announces Fall Drama Schedule

$1

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
The University Players' 1962-'63
Playbill will go international with
the presentation of an Italian
farce and a heavy drama, a Span-
ishdrama and a French fantasy.
Starting the season, the Players
will present Carlo Goldoni's clas-
sic farce "The Servant of Two
Masters" Oct. 30 and Nov. 1-3.
Next on the bill, the opera de-
partment of the music school will
present a laboratory opera Dec.
6-8 as a bonus production, free to
season subscribers.
Luigi Pirandello's b r o o d I n g
drama "Six Characters in Search
of an Author" will be presented
Jan. 9-12, to be followed by a full-
length opera performed by the
opera department March 5-9.
For the Spanish touch, the Play-
ers will present Federico Garcia
Lorca's drama of modern Spain,
"The House of Bernarda Alba,"
March 27-30.
"The Madwoman of Chaillot,"
Jean Giraudoux's whimsical fan-
tasy will be presented April 24-27.
Completing the season, the
Players will premiere "A Matter
of Style," by Jack O'Brien, Grad.,
May 16-18. O'Brien won a Major
H o p w o o d (creative writing)
Award for this comedy last spring.
"The Servant of Two Masters"
was written in the mid-eighteenth
century by Goldoni as a reaction
against the tradition of the Com-
edia dell'Arte in which actors im-
provised both actions and dialogue
for the plays.
"Six Characters in Search of an
Author" reflects the disillusion-
ment and unsureness throughout
the world following World War I.
The characters are bewildered and
searching, unable to find the an-
swers they seek. Pirandello dwells
on the illusions on which life is
built and the philosophy that since
truth varies with the individual,
there can be no truth and, hence,
no communication between people.
Lorca, who died in the Spanish
Civil War, was one of the first art-
ists to strip the Spanish nobility
of its facade of dignity.
With O'Brien's comedy, the
Players return to the lighter side.
"A Matter of Style" is a witty
comedy about life in the limelight
and is O'Brien's third produced
play.

'U' PLAYERS OFFERING-Prof. Claribel Baird (left) of the de-
partment of speech played the title role in the 1953 production of
Jean Giraudoux' "The Madwoman of Chaillot." Prof. Baird will re-
create this role this season in the University Players' production
of the play April 24-27. The Playbill will open Oct. 30 with Carlo
Goldoni's "The Servant of Two Masters" at Trueblood Aud. Other
productions include "The House of Bernarda Alba" by Lorca, Pir-
andello's "Six Characters in Search of an Author," and "A Matter
of Style" by Jack O'Brien.

'WILL RISE AGAIN' :

Pollinger Voices Plans
For Humor Magazine

By MARTHA MAC NEAL
"Gargoyle will rise aagin,"
Richard Pollinger, '65L, insists.
In an attempt to breathe life
into the momentarily defunct
campus humor magazine, Gar-
goyle, Pollinger, would-be. editor,
Robert Israel, Grad., would-be art
editor, and Norma Wicker, Spec.,
would-be business manager, are
searching the campus for talented
recruits willing to work regularly.
A mass meeting will be held for
all interested students sometime
next week, Pollinger said. Mean-
while, applicants for Gargoyle will
be welcomed at the Student Pub-
lications Bldg.
Pollinger hopes to publish four
eight by eleven inch issues this

"Bartholomew Fair," a musical
fantasy based on Ben Johnson's
final comic masterpiece, is in the
finishing writing stage for this
year's production of Musket.
The work, originally written in
1614, has been restructured and
adapted for the modern musical
stage by Jack O'Brien, Grad., who
wrote both book and lyrics, and
Robert James, who wrote the mu-
sic and orchestrated the score.
Use of Johnson's material as
modern musical comedy is bound
to arouse great interest and spec-
ulation among those familiar with
Johnson's work since he is the
acknowledged master of many ele-
ments of the concept of modern
American musical comedy, O'Brien
explained.
Character Sketches
Basically, the musical is a series
of character sketches, undeniably
some of Jonson's best, O'Brien
commented. It portrays a group
of aristocrats who spend a day at
Bartholomew Fair, a rather car-
nival-like cloth market outside of
London.
They are led by Bartholomew
Cokes, an impulsive, happily ma-
ture person whose fiance has just
arrived in town. He is determined
to show her the fair because he
himself is in love with it. Accom-
panying them on their holiday are
his fiancee's guardian, Mistress
Overdo, Reverend Busy, and Wini-
wife and Quarlous, two elegant
and wealthy friends.
Hypocrite Cleans Morals
Present at the Fair are Justice
Overdo, a hypocritical judge bent
on cleaning up the morals at the
Fair, Ursula, female version of
Falstaff, seller of roast pig and
bottle-ale and various characters
of dubious repute.
Everyone becomes a target for
everyone else in this happy mix-up
as the crooks of the Fair prey
upon the unsuspecting aristocrats,
Bartholomew's friends lure away
his fiancee, and Bartholomew car-
ries on a love affair with the Fair.
"The staging for the new musi-
cal is as challenging and exciting
as the material itself since James
and I have introduced original ele-
ments in both stage design and
orchestration which we believe
will bring about a more itghtly-
knit construction of music, move-
ment and drama," O'Brien said.
The musical will have its pre-
miere in Ann Arbor Nov. 28-30
and Dec. 1.
NPP Begins
Poetry Contest
The National Poetry Press of
Los Angeles, Calif., has announced
its annual competition for stu-
dents, teachers and librarians for
inclusion in the College Students'
Poetry Anthology and the College
Teachers' National Poetry An-
thology.
Closing date for submission of
manuscripts by students is Nov. 5
and for teachers and librarians is
Jan. 1. Each poem must be typed
or printed on a separate sheet of
paper and sent to 3210 Selby Ave.,
Los Angeles, Calif.

Pro gram
Notes

O'Brien will be directing the
musical, with James conducting
the orchestra. Harry Taxin, '64E,
is General Chairman of Musket.
Last year, Musket presented an-
other play written by O'Brien and
James, "Land Ho!".
Unlike this year's presentation,
the 1961 play was an original mu-
sical comedy, which concerned
Columbus' voyage to and discovery
of America. However, the discov-
ery of women, stowed away in the
ship, complicated matters.
"Land Ho!" met with very good
success, and helped to establish
O'Brien in the University creative
community.

DIALFa NOW!
DIAL Features at 1:25-3:25-
NO 2-6264 5:25-7:25 & 9:30
THE GREATEST THRILL CLASSIC OF ALL TIMEI

year, and one issue lampooning a
national magazine. Gargoyle will
be "funnier, and more sophisticat-
ed, with features of both local
humor and universal glee," he
says.
Some satires of University life
are being prepared already, and
tentative arrangements have been
made for enough advertising to
finance two issues. A "sizable
number" of prospective satirists
have expressed interest, according
to Pollinger, Juniors are especially
needed, to take over senior posi-
tions at the end of this year and
thus prevent Gargoyle from dying
once more.
"Faculty members here and at
other schools like Harvard and
Stanford Universities, have ex-
pressed great delight at the pros-
pect of a resurrected "Gargoyle,"
Pollinger says. "Circulation used
to -be 5,000 per issue, and we hope
to sell a lot more here and at other
campuses."
The Board in Control must ap-
prove a dummy issue of the new
"Gargoyle" before the magazine
may be published.
Two years ago, two separate at-
tempts were made by two differ-
ent groups to re-establish "Gar-
goyle." The Board in Control of
Student Pulbications rejected the
dummy copies as unsatisfactory.
Last spring a second attempt was
made by the group, led by Pol-
linger, but the board received the
petition too late. This current at-
tempt may be the last, as humor
magazines seem to be dying out at
college campuses across the coun-
try.

More than 300 cars manufac-
tured between 1899 and 1925 will
be displayed at the Old Car Fes-
tival in Greenfield Village tomor-
row and Sunday.
Among the contests at the fes-
tival will be cranking, slow driving
and a modern drag race.
Flower Drum Song...
Rogers and Hammerstein's "The
Flower Drum Song" will be the
final attraction at the Northland
Playhouse. The musical, running
through Sunday, stars Ramon Na-
varro and Juanita Hall.
Money and Banking...
Prof. Thomas Gies of the busi-
ness administration school will
discuss his research findings on
"The Role of Money" in a program
on station WWJ-TV at 12 p.m.
Sunday.
Prof. Gies will probe the question
of restrictions on American banks
and their effect on national
growth.
Cardiac Cather.. .
The Cardiac Catheter, a device
that makes it possible to record
pressures, oxygen saturations and
take blood samples within the hu-
man heart, will be explained on
the program "The Heart Wand" at
9:00 a.m. Sunday over station
WXYZ-TV. The step by step pro-
cedure in the catheterization of
the heart of an 11-year-old girl
to determine the nature of a heart
defect will be shown.
Loyalty and Freedom..
Faculty members will express
their views on problems affecting
the rights and liberties of free
men in America on a program at
9:30 a.m. Sunday over Station
WXYZ-TV, entitled "Freedom,
Loyalty and Subversion."
Horses to Hardtops...
Early motoring days will be de-
picted in song, story, film and
photographs on "From Horses to
Hardtops," a view of the early his-
tory of Michigan's automotive in-
dustry.
The program will be presented
at 7:15 a.m. tomorrow on station
WJBK-TV.

(Continued from Page 1)
Shakespeare Festival at Stratford,
Conn., will recreate his role of Sir
Peter Teazle.
"We, Comrades Three," written
mostly in verse, is "a re-creation
of Whitman's experiences in the
Civil War and the moral corrup-
tion of the Reconstruction period,"
according to author Baldridge.
Baldridge, who will be in residence
on campus to participate in the
preparation and rehearsal of the
production under a special grant
from the University, will co-direct
the play with Ellis Rabb, APA's
artistic director.
"We, Comrades Three" was se-
lected from nearly 300 entries in
the newly instituted playwright
project.
Baldridge, a director at the Mc-
Carter Theatre at Princeton Uni-
versity, recently began to write for
the theatre. Graduated from the
University of Iowa in fine arts, he
had a fellowship in comparative
literature at Harvard University
and later taught at Bennington
College drama department.
Shows Versatility'
Baldridge was producer-director
for the Brattle Theatre Company
at Cambridge, Mass., and has also
directed operas for the Lyric Op-
era of Chicago, La Scala in Italy,
Aix-en-provence in France and
the Florence May Music Festival.
He has contributed poetry and
short stories to Harpers and the
Kenyon and Hudson Reviews and
was editorial assistant for Flair
Magazine.
In her own adaptation of
"Ghosts," Miss Le Gallienne will
portray Mrs. Alving and will also
direct the production of the Ibsen
drama. She was founder of the
first successful repertory company
in the United States, the Civic
Repertory Theatre in New York.
"For her to join the APA repre-
sents an historic dramatic linking
To Consider
Deeded Woods
Controversy
The University Board of Re-
gents will discuss the problem of
Eberwhite Woods at its meeting
next Friday.
The woods had been deeded by
the University to the Ann Arbor
Board of Education. Last August
members of the Board agreed to
transfer the woods to the city as
payment for a $19 thousand sew-
er assessment bill.
However, Roscoe 0. Bonisteel,
Jr., the schools' legal counsel told
trustees that the only party they
could deed the woods to would be
back to the University. It is up to
the Board of Regents to decide
what to do with the woods, he
said.

Magazine
TIME
LIFE
NEWSWEEK
Sports Illustrated
Arch. Forum
Fortune
Saturday Review
Atlantic Monthly
New Yorker
U S News &
, World Report
Scientific Amer.
New Republic
Nation
Playboy
Reader's Digest

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3.50 8 mos.
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3.67 39 wks.
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FACULTY
STUDENT and CLERGY

SPECIAL
CAMPUS RATES

in the evolution of the American
repertory theatre," Prof. Robert
C. Schnitzer, executive director of
the PTP, pointed out.
Three Leading Wothen
In addition to Miss Le Gallienne
and Miss Harris, the APA com-
pany will feature three other dis-
tinguished Broadway leading wo-
men. Anne Meacham, a star of
last season's Broadway production
of "A Passage to India," is the re-
cipient of critical awards for her
portrayal of the title role in David
Ross' off-Broadway version of
"Hedda Gabler," as well as for
her appearance as the original

Cathy in Tennessee $Williams'
"Suddenly Last Summer."
Enid Markey was the original
Jane in the first Tarzan film and
was also William S. Hart's leading
lady.
She made her New York stage
debut in the classic comedy "Up
in Mabel's Room," and appeared
on Btoadway in "Mrs. Sycamore,"
"The Women," "Mrs. Patterson,"
"Only in America," and with Hel-
en Hayes in "Happy Birthday" and
"Mrs. McThing." Miss Markey
and Miss Le Gallienne appeared
together in "Southwest Corner"
in the Ann Arbor Drama Season.

REGULAR
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Other special rates available to everyone:
Sat. Eve. Post 29 issues 1.99 50 issues 3.49 100 issues 7.00
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Ladies Home Journal yr. 3.00 2 yrs. 5.50
Reporter 10 mos. 3.27
Mail your order NOW so that your subscription will begin in the
fall semester. Or, if you are in Ann Arbor, phone your order to our
office, 662-3061 for these or other magazines.
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