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January 10, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Honors Group Views Separate Housing

Those in favor of such a hous-'
ing unit noted the opportunity it
would bring for meaningful dis-
cussion and associations among
students of similar intellectual
capabilities and motivations. Some
of these students felt that dormi-
tory life does not encourage the
brighter student, in providing an
environment where academic goals
are of prime importance.
Some of those who cited the
value of giving honors students the
opportunity to live with other hon-
ors students thought the Honors
College was a logical place to be-
gin a move to encourage more in-
terest in scholarship and academic
pursuits throughout the whole
University community.
Another participant in the dis-
cussion felt that the Honors Col-
lege is perhaps not even a college,
but just a body of people to whom
a certain label is attached. It was
noted that there is not much that
gives honors students as a group a
corporate existence, even though
the clustering together of com-
munities and of students of com-
mon interests is a fact of Univer-
sity life.
Another discussant noted that
the current trend at the Univer-
sity toward a wide variety of dor-
mitories and to the permissions
granted to other voluntarily con-
stituted groups, such as sororities
and fraternities, to join together
in housing units, would seem to
give honors students the same
privilege.
However, other participants in

the discussion opposed the general
concepts as they pointed to the
value of a living experience which
includes students of many differ-
ent groups and intellectual capaci-
ties and motivations.
Such people feared restricting
associations that would be detri-
mental to the honors students
themselves and emphasized the
healthy balance in student per-
sonalities that present arrange-
ments in dormitory living provide.
A desire to preserve the demo-
cratic nature of the membership
of University housing units was
also expressed.
The students and faculty mem-
bers also considered the credit
hour system. Several students not-
ed the imbalance between the
number of credit hours offered,
and the hours of required class
work.
Some Honors students noted
that the honors seminars par-
ticularly involved a great deal
more work than the credits would
indicate.
Student Theatre
To Present Plays
Two student-written plays,
"The Christening" by James Har-
ris Jr., '63, and "Piers and Pil-
ings" by Ted Rancont Jr., '64, will
be produced by the Student Lab-
oratory Theatre of the speech de-
partment today at 4:10 p.m. in
the Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.

To Analyze
Study Plans
For Women
By DAVID MARCUS
Mrs. Stanley Cain of extension
service will begin a study of pro-
grams to aid in the continuing
education of women.
Working under Vice-President
for Academic Affairs Roger Heyns,
Mrs. Cain will, beginning Feb. 1,
gather data on programs of other
universities in this area, surveying
the needs of women for continuing
education and possibilities for
employment in various areas.
"We are not thinking of any
entirely new program but a chan-
nel for women who are rusty,"
Mrs. Cain said.
College Education
The data-gathering will be
mainly directed toward aiding wo-
men who have married during
college or women with a college
education whose children are in
school, she added.
"Many of these women have 35
or 40 years of life ahead of them
and want to be useful members of
society."
She hopes to have an initial
report which will either point the
way to a program or to further
necessary research ready by
June 1.
Preliminary Report
The project grew out of a re-
port prepared by Mrs. Cain, on
her own initiative, on the continu-
ing education of women. After
submitting the memo to the Office
of Academic Affairs, Heyns re-
quested that Mrs. Cain undertake
the study.
In the report she lists the proj-
ects undertaken in this area by
other institutions.
Mrs. Cain described the pro-
gram of the University of Minne-
sota as most analogous to one the
University might undertake. The
Minnesota project was launched
by a $110,000 grant from the Car-
negie Foundation two years ago
and is the oldest continuing edu-
cation program in the country for
women. The University might find
a similar program suitable since
both are large tax-supported pub-
lic institutions.

TWO COLLEGES:
Subcommittee Studies
Dual Degree Program
8 (.

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
Any combined degree program
between a professional school and
the literary college must retain
the essential features of the
bachelor of arts degree, the liter-
ary college subcommittee on com-
bined degrees recently decided.
In a report accepted by the lit-
erary college curriculum commit-'
tee, the subcommittee recoi-
m e n d e d that any combined
degree programs under considera-
tion should be structured to
include the following:
1) The distribution require-
ments of the literary college
should be fulfilled;
Literary Degree
2) A student should select his
major in a literary college depart-'
ment;
3) A minimum of 90 hours
should be taken in the literary
college.
The subcommittee was formed
as a result of a proposal for a
combined degree program by the
engineering college. The program
would give both an engineering
Kelly Leaves
Peace Corps
Prof. E. Lowell Kelly of the
psychology department will be
succeeded by Edwin Ruthvan
Henry as director of peace corps
volunteers, it was recently an-
nounced.
Prof. Kelly server for one year
in that capacity. His successor,
Henry, is being given a one-year
leave of absence from Standard
Oil Co. of New Jersey, where he is
manager of the social science re-
search division.
See you at the
SOCK HOP
Friday, January 11
Union Ballroom
9-12 $1.50 per couple

and a literary college degree aft
five years of work.
Two Counselors
According to tentative plans 1
the engineering college, a stude
could join the program aft
spending his freshman year
either the literary college or t
engineering college. After notif
ing his counselor of his desire
join the program, the stude
would be given counselors in bo
colleges.
A specific combined degree pr
gram between the two colleges h
not yet been accepted.
Prof. Edward Halpern of tl
mathematics d e p a r t m e n t az
chairman of the subcommitti
said that a student in the pr
posed program could receive h
engineering degree in any eng
neering field.
Literary college students wl
are not in any special joint pr
gram are still restricted to
maximum of 12 hours credit I
courses in the engineering colleg
Prof. Halpern added.

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Development Strate-

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General Notices

Student Government Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Michigan Union, Exam, Week Movies,
Jan. 21-24, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m., Union
Ballroom.
Michigan Union, Big Club Sock Hop,
Jan. 11, 9:00-12:00 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. Univ. Ave., Ann
Arbor. Orders for Midyear Graduation
Exercises should be placed immediately.
Women Students Interested in Fence,
ing: A demonstration will be held tot
night at the Women's Athletic Bldg.
at 7:30 p.m. for all women students
interested in forming a club.
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb.
28, 1936: "Students shall pay all ac-
counts due the University not later
than the last day of classes of each
semester or summer session. Student
loans which are not paid or renewed
are subject to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the close of
business on the last day of classes will
be reported to the Cashier of the Uni-
versity and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Christian Science Org., Weekly Meet-
ing, Jan. 10, 7:30 p.m., 528D SAB.
* * *
Congregational Disciples E & R Stud.
Guild, Mid-Week worship, Jan. 10, 12:10-
12:40 p.m., 1st Congr. Church, Douglas
Chapel, William St.
* * *
Deutschei Verein, Kaffee Stunde, Jan.
10, 3-5 p.m., 4096 FB.
Newman Center, Fireside Chat, "The
Vatican Council & its Effect on Protest-
antism," Dance following, Jan. 11, 8
p.m., 331 Thompson.

or summer session just completed will
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such accounts
will not be allowed to register in any
subsequent semester or summer session
until payment has been made."
Martha Cook Bldg. Is receiving appli-
cations for Sept. 1963. Present Freshmen
and Sophomore women may apply.
Please telephone NO 2-3225 for an ap-
pointment.
Events
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., Jan.
11, 4:15 p.m., The Observatory.f J. Paul
Mutschlecner, Dept. of Astronomy, will
speak on "The Abundances of Li, Be,
and Pb in the Solar Atmosphere."
Film Showing: "Communist Blueprint
for Conquest and a Study of the USSR"
will be shown in the Multi-Purpose Rm.
of the UGLI at 4:05 p.m. by the Arnold
Air Society.
Doctoral Examination for Donald Beers
Evans, Metallurgical Engrg.; thesis: "De-
termination of Nitride Solubility Prod-
ucts in the Solvent Liquid Iron," Fri.,
Jan. 11, 3201 E. Engin. Bldg., at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, R. D. Pehlke.
University Choir and Symphony Or-
chestra: The Univ. Choir and Symphony
Orchestra in conjunction with the 18th
Annual Midwestern Conference on
School Vocal and Instrumental Music
will present a concert on Fri., Jan. 11,
8:30 p.m., Hill Aud. The concert is
conducted by Maynard Klein. Soloists
will be Marjorie Gordon, guest soprano,
Elizabeth Olsen, soprano, Jane Pieper,
soprano, James Miller, tenor, Leslie
Briedenthal, bass, and Harry E. Tibbs,
organist. Compositions to be performed
are Poulenc's Gloria and Mozart's Mass
in C minor. Open to the public.
stringed Instruments Recital: A
stringed instruments solo and ensem-
ble recital will be presented by stu-
dents in the School of Music on Fri.,
Jan. 11, 9:40 a.m. in Rackham Assem-
bly Hall, in conjunction with the 18th
Annual Midwestern Conference on
School Vocal and Instrumental Music.
Student performers will be Daniel Le-
vine, Janice Hupp, Roland Pepper, Ron-
ald Steele, and Jane VanSteenkist.
Open to the public.
Wind Instrument Recital: Wind in-
strument students in the School of Mu-
sic will present a recital on Fri. morn-
ing, Jan. 11, 8:30 a.m. in Hill Aud. in
(Continued on Page 5)

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