100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r, JANUARY 9,1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAC'r r v

YAt ir, '1R'iKl:N

Ishombe

Returns, Hints
ge Possibilities

At

Sabota,

UN PROJECT:
. To Seek End
To Cuban Aid Plan
UNITED NATIONS WP)-As part of its economic squeeze on Fidel
Castro, the United States will demand that the United Nations cancel
a project to help build a $3 milliop agricultural experiment station

1; .

in Cuba.
This was disclosed by United States sources yesterday. These in-
formants said UN Ambassador Adlaie E. Stevenson had been instruct-
ed to fight right down the line to halt previously approved plans un-
_der which the UN special fund
K3 would grant $1.1 million for the
WJV ld N C project.

I

~Rozndup
By The Associated Press
ROME--The leaders of Italy's
four government coalition parties
emerged from a long meeting last
night in substantial agreement on
major points of dispute. Success
in ironing out differences meant
that Premier Amintore Fanfani's
center - left government could
count on continued life, with na-
tional elections a few months
away.
WASHINGTON - Relay, the
newest United States communica-
tions satellite, will broadcast to
France today recorded television
pictures of last night's official un-
veiling of the Mona Lisa.
WASHINGTON - The United
States countered threats to shoot
down more mercy planes in Laos
yesterday with a demand that the
Communist attacks be stopped and
word that the flights will go on.
* * *
MOSCOW - Outer Mongolia
backed the Kremlin yesterday in
its ideological battle against Red
China, Tass reported. Mongolian
party chief Umzhagin Tsedenbal
charged the activities of the Com-
munist Chinese are an increasing
danger to the tworld Communist
movement, Tass said.
* * *
NEW YORK-The stock market
responded to a new wave of buying
yesterday and rose sharply in
heavy trading. Thirty Dow-Jones
industrials rose 7.74 to 669.98 while
20 railroads were up 2.09 to 150.52
and 15 utilities up 1.02 to 132.76.

The plan was approved in May
1961, but so far it has not been
signed and no concrete steps have
been taken to carry it out. The
United States, which contributes
40 per cent of the mopey spent by
the special fund, voted against the
grant at the time.
Fleeing Technicians
- The United States took the posi-
tion that the project could not be
carried out because of the large
number of Cuban agricultural
technicians fleeing the country.
United States sources said this
situation was even more compli-
cated now because of Soviet tech-
nicians in Cuba.
The United States plans were
disclosed as a government report
in Washington painted a gloomy
picture of Cuba's agriculture. The
United States Foreign Agricultural
Service said Cuban farm produc-
tion had dropped 20 per cent since
Castro took over. The report added
that the food situation in Cuba is
the worst in years and may get
even worse this year.
Stevenson Actions
Stevenson was reported ready
to make strong representations to
former United States industrialist
Paul G. Hoffman, head of the spe-
cial fund, in an attempt to con-
vince him that the project should
be canceled, and go before the,
special fund's governing council,
which meets next week, and con-
tinue the fight there if his appeal
to Hoffman fails.
In other action the United States
government is also providing five
million pounds of dried milk to be
sent to Cuba as part payment for
release of prisoners from the Bay
of Pigs disaster.
As much as 15 million addition-
al pounds may be provided.

MOISE TSHOMBE
... returns to capital

NEW PLANS:
Goulart Gains
Support Vote
In Plebiscite
RIO DE JANEIRO ()-Flushed
by an overwhelming vote of pub-
lic confidence, President Joao
Goulart started laying plans yes-
terday for a new cabinet to rule
with him in the return of a strong
presidential system to Brazil.
Political opponents warned him
against a strong-man takeover in
the style of the late dictator Ge-
tulio Vargas.
Latest unofficial returns from a
plebiscite Sunday showed more
than 5 million Brazilians voted to
throw out a 16-month-old parlia-
mentary system of government.
The tabulations-about half com-
plete-showed one million favored
retaining it. j
The parliamentary system was
inaugurated in September 1961,
after the resignation of Janio
Quadros as president, to keep full
presidential powers from falling
into Goulart's hands. Military
leaders feared Goulart, then vice-
president, was too far left to gov-
ern under a presidential system
that was comparable to that of the
United States.
Goulart, will pick a cabinet to
replace the present one headed
by Prime Minister Hermes Lima,
who must resign Jan. 31.

Says Dams,
Bridges Set
To Explode
Mining Group Asks
Support To End War
ELISABETHVILLE W) - Presi-
dent Moise Tshombe came home
to his United Nations-occupied
capital yesterday with a sharp hint
that the threat of sabotage still
hangs over Katangan mines and
utilities.
Union Miniere, which owns most
of the mines and utilities, agreed
with him and appealed for coop-
eration to prevent it.
"In spite of all the trouble and
bloodshed, I am back," Tshombe
said in an interview at his presi-
dential palace.
Very Busyj
"My ministers and I have been
very busy in Kolwezi preparing the
demolition of all industries. In that
case Adoula, the UN or we will
have lost everything," he added.
Adoula is Prime Minister Cyrille
Adoula of the central Congo gov-
ernment, prospective chief politi-
cal beneficiary of the Katanga-
Congo reunification plan that UN
Secretary-General U Thant pro-
poses to have in effect by next
Monday.
Union Miniere, at least, fully
agreed that the sabotage threat
exists.
Mined Dams
The giant copper mining com-
pany said Katangan police have
mined essential dams and power
stations and occupy all its pits and
plants in the area of Kolwezi.
In statements issued in Brussels
and at UN headquarters in New
York, it appealed to all responsible
parties "to cooperate in measures
to prevent further damage" in the
11-day-old war.
Coincident with Tshombe's re-
turn came news of serious tribal
fighting in Kasai province, where
the UN Congo command had re-
duced its power to swell its task
forces in Katanga.
The Congolese News Agency, a
semiofficial organ, reported in Leo-
poldville that at least 370 Congo-
lese were killed in a battle between
two factions at Kakenge.

Vie sSay CONGRESSIONAL MEETINGS:
RedsDeadHouse Republica
WASHINGTON (M)-A mild re-
volt flared in House Republican Committee, and Speake
H its 7 0 0ranks yesterday as Democratica McCormack (D-Mass)
leaders marshaled their forces be- the President's legislat
hind President John F. Kennedy's in the coming session
SAIGON (p)-The government legislative program for the new very good one."
claimed last night its forces killed Congress opening today. Reps. Charles E. Go
A group of younger members NY) and Robert P. G
or wounded more than 700 Viet toppled Rep. Charles Hoeven (R- Mich), who led the figh
Cong guerrillas in two extended Iowa) from his post as GOP cau- told newsmen their so
operations that ended Monday. cus chairman and elected Rep. was to win greater rep
The claim was not confirmed Gerald Ford (R-Mich) to replace for newer members in p
by American sources. Fewer than him. cils. They said they had
100 casualties could be confirmed Ford's backers also won three rel with the House G(
independently. additional seats on the 33-member ship.
According to Vietnamese report GOP policy committee, but then Ford told reportersI
hAgering oVitameswe rportthe Republicans closed ranks again "in no way indicates a(
the staggering victories wereouledrhp"Hlck
achieved in two operations north and reelected Rep. Charles A. Hal- our leadership." Hallec
of Saigon-one near the Cambod- leck (R-Ind) as their floor leader. no open part in the b
ian frontier, the other in a Red HouseuDemocrats voted at a par-b odae onef
enclve now asD Zne.ty caucus to support Kennedy's able, diligent and effects
The government said both oper- plea for a bigger House Rules bers of the House an
Theg___rnmn____id____h____r- would "make his cont
ations were planned and mounted the effectiveness of th
in complete secrecy, and results 4 1 A:i
withheld until now to insure mili-T A sky A idtook
tary security. vote on the issue of en:
Files Complaint House Rules Committee
In another development, the For Shelters and Halleck said GOP
government filed a new complaint was overwhelmingly a
with the International Control increase sought by Ken
Commission, claiming a North WASHINGTON (P) - President Administration sourc
Vietnamese army colonel had been John F. Kennedy is planning an ued to predict they wou
killed in South Viet Nam recently. appeal to the new Congress for fed- big fight in the House
The complaint said papers found eral funds to help schools, hospi- conceded that GOP1
on a guerrilla identified him as tals and welfare institutions build tightening and said tht
Col. Do Van Giong of the North fallout shelters, government sourc- would be close.
Vietnamese Army. This was proof es said yesterday. Senate Republicans
of North Vietnamese intervention The request, a scaled-down ver- all their leaders at a h
in South Viet Nam in violation of sion of the "incentive payments" party conference. Th
the Geneva agreement of 1954. plan killed by Congress last year, headed by Sen. EverettI
Reports of government victories will cairy an urgent label because (R-Ill) as minority lead
followed several days of Viet Cong of what the administration views Thomas H. Kuchel (R
successes, including the battle in as gaps in civil defense prepara- assistant leader.
the Mekong River delta last week tions ghlighted by the Cuban They left for later
that cost 68 government soldiers Thre have been hints Kenne- appointment of a succes
lives. dy's fcal 1964 budget message will Barry Goldwater (R
In subsequent Viet Cong attacks ask something over $300 million chairman of the Republ
on a special forces training camp for thething ov illin torial Campaign Comm
in the mountains and on a stra- about half of what he sought last step aside becau
tegic hamlet near South China's byear, but roughly three times the a candidate for re-e
sea coast, large numbers of gov- $113 million he actually got year.
ernment troops also were killed $113 miindhensctuny n-ayoRep. Francis E. Walt
and wounded. Viet Cong losses al- e o iht, however as a supple- chairman of the Demo
so had been heavy. menta? approp'iaticn for fiscal cus, told newsmen th
Offset Propaganda 19( 3. now half over, to permit a of most party memb
It is expected the Saigon gov- f ster start on a school shelter
ernment will try to capitalize on drive,
any military successes of its own
to offset the propaganda effect of 1 orn cTh1
Viet Cong successes, which con -P aiei o W onc
tributes to the unreliability of of-
ficial casualty statistics. W ithout Union
There is no doubt fighting and ASSOC.1
casualties are increasing sharply, N
however. ,tNEW YORK (Pi)-A fact-finding
A high American source said th trio of jurists announced yester-
expected the Viet Cong to continue day they will complete their sur-
stepping up military pressure as a vey of New York's 32-day news-
countermove to growing govern- paper blackout, even if string un- j
ment influence in the highlands ion printers refuse to cooperate.
area. Bertram A. Powers, president of
Officials here are seriously wor- striking Local 6, AFL-CIO Inter- Lect
ried about the political impact of national Typographical Union, said
Viet Cong successes, although his printers will boycott fact-find-
viewed in an over-all military pic- ing sessions unless a membership Moral Valu
ture, the Communist gains are re- meeting next Sunday approves
garded as not significant. participation. The panel is sched- Open to Al
I l Ld tJ U J.l1t it cb dlu b T P-

ns Pick Ford

r John W.
predicted
Live record
"will be a
oodell (R-
3riffin (R-
t for Ford,
le purpose
resentation
party coun-
d no-quar-
OP leader-
his victory
division in
k, who took
brief fight,
f the most
tive" mem-
d said he
ribution to
e minority
no formal
larging the
e, but Ford
sentiment
gainst the
nedy.
es contin-
ild win this
e, but they
lines werej
he outcome
re-elected
harmonious
e list was
M. Dirksen
er and Sen.
-Calif) as
action the
ssor to Sen.
-Ariz) as
ican Sena-
mittee who
se he will
lection this
er (D-Pa),
wratic cau-
e attitude
ers at the

meeting "indicates pretty clearly"
that a move to enlarge the Rules
Committee to 15 members will suc-
ceed.
Fighting against what they call
an effort to "pack" the committee
in favor of administration bills are
many Republicans and a group of
conservative Southern Democrats
led by Rep. Howard W. Smith (D-
Va), who is chairman of the em-
battled Rules Committee.
Rep. Carl Albert (D-Okla) and
other Democratic officers of the
House and the caucus were renom-
inated and are expected to be re-
elected with Speaker McCormack
at today's opening session.
To Increase
Draft Quotas
WASHINGTON (R) -The De-
fense Department yesterday asked
the drafting of 9,000 men for the
Army in March.
This is the biggest monthly quo-
ta since January 1962, and more
than doubles the quotas of recent
months.
The sharply increased quota was
foreshadowed by an Army an-
nouncement last November that it
would expand its strength by 20,-
000 men through increased draft
calls for a six-month period.
The higher draft is aimed at
building the Army's strength to
980,000 men.
The quota for this month and
for next stands at 4,000 men. In
December, 6,000 were drafted.
The biggest previous monthly
quota was a year ago when the Ar-
my took 15,000 men as part of the
Berlin crisis buildup.
The Navy, Marine Corps and Air
Force do not intend to draw on the
draft during March, the Defense
Department said.

I,

TONIGHT at 8 P.M.
H I LLEL presents
Prof. DONALD HALL
of the English Dept.

speaking on

0

CK BOTTOM"
Lure No. 7 in its Series
on
es Reflected in Great Literature"
1429 Hill St.

Peek Evaluates McNamara's New Role

ue o compee;s su yy r-
day.

--

------------v Y YYYY V Y V Y VYY' Y YY YYY YYYY tY

I -------------------

i

j%**-

COUPON DAYS

I

4I

Reg, 73c REGENCY DRUGS
100 TABLETS
BAYER 47C
LIMIT 1
THIS COUPON GOOD TO JAN. 16 M

,
;t
f.
"
+
.":

By BARBARA PASH
Democratic Sen. Patrick McNa-
mara's recently-acquired chair-
manship of the Public Works Com-
mittee will not make much dif-
ference in the committee's func-
tioning or for Michigan, Prof.
George Peek of the political sci-
ence department noted yesterday.
McNamara acquired the chair-
manship as the second in seniority
following the former chairman,
Sen. Robert Kerr (D-Okla), who
died recently.
"Kerr was valuable to the pres-
ent administration because he was
second in seniority on the Finance
Committee and it was in this ca-
pacity that he was supposed to aid
President John F. Kennedy with
the tax reform. Sen. Harry Byrd
(D-Va), chairman of that com-
mittee now, is against the reform,"
he explained.
The Public Works Committee is
not as crucial a committee as the
Finance or Appropriations Com-
mittees are considered to be. "In

fact, it is really one of the lesser
committees of the Senate," Peek
continued.
Rivers, Harbors
The Public Works Committee
mandate states that its purpose is
to concern itself with rivers, har-
bors and water pollution, as the
most important of its duties.
"The committee passes out a few
favors concerning bridges, dams
and others, but most of this has
already been decided before it gets
to the Public Works Committee.
The projects must have appropria-
tions and the Appropriations Com-
mittee decides this," he said.
The major issues for Congress
this year are aid to education,
Medicare, tax reforms and appro-
priations for the Agency for In-
ternational Development. None of
these come within the jurisdiction
of the Public Works Committee.
Labor, Welfare
"However, McNamara's import-
ant position is that of being second
in seniority on the Labor and Pub-

lic Welfare Committee," Peek ob-
served.
This committee, headed by Sen.
Lister Hill (D-Ala), is concerned
with all matters regarding labor-
management relations, w a g e s,
hours, labor disputes and educa-
tion and hospitalization (under
public welfare).
"To have a senator from Michi-
gan as chairman of this commit-
tee would be advantageous. This is,
obviously, a more powerful position
than the Public Works Commit-
tee," he remarked.

I COUPON DAYS

;,<
,,r
Y-
'<:, -:
:-.,,
1 , :.
. _-
r = .

100 CAPSULES
MYADEC

REUcrN4I.J UUU

$4 41

r-"
OF,

LIMIT 1
THIS COUPON GOOD TO JAN. 16

...

M

,4 ,
> _-
E
'yt

COUPON DAYS'
Reg. 98c REGENCY DRUGS
12 Oz. LOTION
JERGENS

*rT
*!
*'
*'
*'
*"
*"
*!
*'
*'
*'
*'
*"
*
*"
*-
*
*{
*"
*
1(
7}
*'
*
7t
*"
*f
*
*"
*"
*'

4t
.#c

DID YOU KNOW THAT
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
BUSINESS STAFF
offers you valuable experience in:
" advertising
" promotions
* layout
* accounting
* other valuable business skills
plus the opportunity to work
for the finest college newspaper
business staff in the country.
No experience is necessary.

'K
'K
it

I

I

LIMIT A
THIS COUPON GOOD TO WA

wN. 16 M

I

COUPON DAYS
Re.c 98c REGENCY DRUGS

IM
j:

MENNEN

SKIN BRACER

65'

r,';.,
.: {
- 1
..!
:M ..
, :::

LIMIT 1
THIS COUPON GOOD TO JAN. 16

M

' -- - t -- - a

I

4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan