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January 09, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

D4\EN#4 AY. JAI

THE MICIGAN DILY WEJNFunAYi A1

CENTENNIAL:
Hughes Tells Negro Troubles

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
"How the Negro survived the.
first 100 years, of freedom I'll
never know, unless it was because
he managed to get through his
200 years of slavery," Langston
Hughes said yesterday.
He was speaking through his
fictional character Jesse B. Semple
as part of a reading of his poems
with commentary entitled "I, too,
sing America," at the University's
opening program commemorating
the centennial of Abraham Lin-
eoln's Emancipation Proclamation.
Hughes tried to show "some of
the Negro's little problems I have
seen," using the poems to illustrate
the Negro's feelings about his
sorrows.
Major Problem
A major problem for the eman-
cipated ;Negro is not only that he
is denied equal opportunities in
getting jobs and voting, but that
even immigrants barely off the
boat receive better treatment than
a Negro born and raised in Amer-
ica, according to Hughes.

"I always had the impression
that I'm as American as anyone
else," he remarked. To describe
this feeling, he used the poem
"Madam's Calling Card." In this
poem, the Negro heroine, asked
whether she wants her name in-
scribed on her calling cards in
Old English or Roman letters,
replies: "Use American . . . there's
nothing foreign to my pedigree."
The Negro's plight is worsened,
Hughes said, by the discrepancy
between what he hears and what
is actually practiced. "You can't
hear about democracy on the ra-.
dio and not help wanting some of
it."
KKK Exists
He pointed out that "in the
deep South where segregation is
legal," only six per cent of the
Negro children go to integrated
schools and that the Ku Klux
Klan exists even today.
In an interview later, Hughes
dsecribed the Southern integra-
tion picture as "very disappoint-
ing to most Negroes."
Elaborating specifically on the

Across Campus

Prof. Donald Hall, of the English
department, will give the conclud-
ing lecture in the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation series on "Mor-
al Values Reflected in Great Lit-
erature" at 8 p.m. today at Hillel.
His address /is entitled "Rock
Bottom," and is based on the
works of William Butler Yeats,
James Joyce, and T. S. Eliot.
'Fantasticks' .'
The box office for "The Fan-
tasticks," the off-Broadway musi-
cal coming to Ann Arbor Jan. 15-
20, opens today at Trueblood Aud.
Tickets will be on sale daily from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Birds...
Prof. Harrison B. Tordoff of the
zoology department will discuss the
"Biology of Crossbills" at 4 p.m..
today in Rm. 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Mexican Flowers...
Prof. Jerzy Rzedowski of Escue-
ka Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas
of Mexico City will examine the
"Endemic Elements in, the Mexican
Flora" at 4:15 p.m. today in Rm.
1139 Natural Science Bldg. ,
Journaism...
Charles W. Ferguson, senior edi-
tor of The Reader's Digest, will
lecture on "Headlines and His-

tory," at 3 p.m. today in Rack-
ham Amph. The lecture is spon-
sored by the journalism depart-
ment.
Attitudes .. .
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld, of the
political science department, will
speak on "Attitudes and Actions
Inside the United States" at 8
p.m. today at the Ann Arbor Pub-
lic Library. The lecture is spon-
sored by the Ann Arbor Women
for Peace.
HSU Enrolls
Record Total
EAST LANSING MA--Classes for
23,481 students,. a record winter
term enrollment, began Monday
at Michigan State University's
main campus.
MSU's total enrollment, includ-
ing the main campus, MSU-Oak-
land and university resident cen-
ters, is 26,050. The figure is 11
per cent higher than the previous
record in 1962.
The university set its all-time
enrollment mark in the fall term
of 1962, when 27,727 students were
attending classes, including some
25,000 at the main campus..

Meredith case, he said, "in the
hard-core states of the South we
have learned that you can't work
these problems out peacefully and
protect one man with 600 troops."
Intend To Integrate
He called for a "sweeping over-
all announcement once and for all
that we intend' to integrate and
go in with an army if necessary"
to enforce the announcement.
As for more peaceful measures,
he commended the student pro-
test movements. "Students have
grown more liberal through their
concern for race problems," he
said.
"Sit-ins have made a broaden-
ing of social interest so that stu-
dents on the whole are very for-
Illegal
A Democratic paper, "The
Michigan Argus," only paper
published in Ann Arbor at the
time of the Emancipation Proc-
lamation, opposed it on grounds
that it was illegal:
"We do not believe the Presi-
dent has any 'legal authority
even as a war measure to do
what he has attemnpted. Procla-
mations will not put down the
rebellion and restore the Union.
A peace is to be conquered by
force of arms, and we say push
on the armies, preserve the Un-
ion, and let slavery take care of
itself.
"The rebels have given the
institution its death blow, let
not the President prolong its
life by attempts to strangle it
both prematurely and illegiti-
mately."
ward-looking and very much for
racial democracy and interested
in all of man's basic social prob-
lems."
He said that many of the Black.
Muslims "are driving at the things'
every Negro wants -- such as
jobs and equality."
However, "the basic tenet of
black against white" is not likely
to perpetuate unity and co-opera-
tion between all men, "especially
in a national organization that
tends toward extreme national-
ism," Hughes concluded.
Hughes' commentary was the
first event of the University's ob-
servance of the centennial of the
issuance of the Emancipation
Proclamation. Tomorrow's pro-
gram will include a lecture by
Prof. Dwight Dumond, of the his-
tory department, speaking on
"The Emancipation Proclama-
tion: Freedom in the Fullness of
Time," at 8 p.m. in Hill Aud.

'Characters'
Shift Bounds
fRealism
By DEBORAH BEATTIE
Luigi Pirandello's "Six Char-
acter's in Search of an Author,"
which will be presented tonight
through Saturday by the Univer-
sity Players, is unique in its de-
liberate attempt to disorient the
audience.
"The audience doesn't know if it
is watching a play, a mockery of
a play or the preparation of a
play," Prof. William R. McGraw
of the speech department, direc-
tor, explains.
The play, which is Pirandello's
most popular, is designed to show
the indefinite line between reality
and illusion and implies that the
reality in man's existence is hard
to pin down.
Disillusionment
Pirandello wrote "Six Charac-
ters in Search of an Author" in
the midst of post World War I
disillusionment. At the time he
was one of the most eloquent
voices of the disillusioned age.
In the play Pirandello is criti-
cizing the theatre of the 1920s,
indicating that it is inadequate in
its attempts to show life as it is,
Prof. McGraw says. He felt that
the realistic theatre had failed to
capture the essence of life or
character which it pretended to
portray.
The play concerns six charac-
ters, whose story is partly told,
and want the rest of their story
told in the theatre. It raises the
question of what is truth. Prof.
McGraw believes that the univer-
sality of Pirandello's questions is
responsible for the wide appeal of
the drama.F
Precursor
He commented that the play is
particularly appropriate now be-
cause it is the precursor of con-
temporary avant garde drama.
Like Samuel Beckett, Edward Al-
bee and Jean Genet, Pirandello
was trying to deny theatre in
writing an anti-theatrical play
which purposely defies convention.
The mood of the play shifts
from tragedy to farce. Pirandello
called it a comedy, but Prof. Mc-
Graw is treating it as basically a
tragic play with comic overtones.
Contributions Add
To Alumni Fund
More than 20,000 alumni and
friends contributed a record to-
tal of $703,285 to the University's
Alumni Fund, last year's national
chairman, John D. Hubbard, re-
ported. A unit of the Development
Council, the fund raises money for
academic needs which do not re-
ceive state appropriation support.

UNEMPLOYED:
'U' Researchers Receive
Funds for Status Study

Gi'I[4711Tc1y5

mwmwvmmm

By BARBARA LAZARUS
Prof. Ronald Freedman of the
sociology department and Mrs. L.
C. Coombs of the Population Stud-
ies Center, have received a grant
from the Social Security Admin-
istration to do a study of "Eco-
nomic Status, Unemployment and
Family Growth."
The purpose of the project is to
"study important aspects of the
relation of economic status and
periods of unemployment or de-
pendency to family growth and
welfare," Prof. Freedman said re-
cently.
The study relies upon 1,300 in-
tensive interviews with white cou-
ples, covering many phases of fam-
ily life, history and the number
of children planned for the future.
The interviews were made Jan.-
March, 1962 in the Detroit area,
Prof. Freedman commented.
Negroes
The study will conduct a series
of interviews with a separate sam-
ple of Negro couples, he added.
Prof. Freedman said that the 1,-
300 couples are presently being
called back for the first time to
determine any changes in family
composition, pregnancies and eco-
nomic status."
"We have been very successful
in reaching about 95 per centof
the people in the first sample," he
said. The couples are mainly being
contacted by telephone interviews.
Family Patterns
The first phase of the study
concerns detailed examination of
the relationship of economic stat-
us and both the husband's and
wife's employm'ent history to past
family growth patterns, to the
number of children expected in the
future, whether children already
born were wanted and health and
other services available to the chil-
dren.
The follow-up study will con-
sider "whether the expressed ex-
pectations about family growth
were realized, whether changes in
expectations were related to shift-
ing economic conditions or unem-
ployment and whether past eco-
nomic status and success in family
planning .are predictive of fertility
and family size," Prof. Freedman
indicated.
The main emphasis is on eco-
nomic variables, but the present
project is part of a larger study
aimed at measuring other vari-
ables related to family planning.
These data might include factors
such as social mobility, religious
influences, internal family struc-
ture and aspirations for the level

of services children should have,
he added.
"It will be possible to see wheth-
er dependency and the economy
of the family, especially in lower
income groups, effect the number
of children the family has and
when it has them," Prof. Freedman
commented.
. "There is already evidence from
other studies that there is such a
relationship, but just how this re-
lationship works out is not
known."
Local FHA
Joins CORE
The Ann Arbor Fair Housing
Association and the Ann Arbor
branch of the Congress of Racial
Equality have merged.
The action came after the AA-
FHA's application for affiliation
with the CORE national group was
accepted at the CORE national
convention in New Orleans last
month.
Officers of the combined group,
elected last week, are: LeMar Mil-
ler, chairman; Dora Cafagna, re-
cording secretary; Ann Holden,
corresponding secretary; Tom Por-
ter, treasurer; and Daryl Bem and
Harry Mial, members of the steer-
ing committee.
USNSA Sets
Travel Guide
The United States National Stu-
dent Association has announced
publication of}its 15th edition of
"Work, Study, Travel Abroad," a
general guide to student travel.
The 150 page book includes in-
formation for students planning
any type of overseas travel ex-
perience. It features information
on tours, independent travel, study
and working abroad, major sum-
mer festivals and money-saving
travel hints.
Student Government Council
acted before Christmas vacation
to establish the Campus Travel
Board, which will administer the
University's branch of Education-
al Travel Incorporated, a USNSA
organization. The board will also
distribute travel information.
The book features introductory
articles by Donald Shank, execu-
tive vice-president of the Institute
of International Education, and
Voit Gilmore, director of the
United States Travel service.

:

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DIAL 5-6290
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9
Day Calendar
3:00 p.m.-Dept. of Journalism Lec-
ture-Charles W. Ferguson, senior edi-
tor, The Reader's Digest, "Headlines
and History": Rackham Amphitheatre.
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Assembly-
Six student speeches with introductions
by winners of competition in Speech
100, Fundamentals of Public Speaking:
Rackham Lecture Hall.
4:00 pm.-Dept. of Zoology Seminar-
Harrison B. Tordoff, Prof. of Zoology,
"Biology of Crossbills": Rh 1400, Chem-
istry Bldg.
4:15 p.m.-Dept, of Botany Seminar--

JAN. 15-20

TRUEBLOOD AUD.

Dr. Jerry Rzedowski, Escuela Nacional
de Ciencias Biologicas, Mexico, D.F.,
Mexico, "The Endemic Element in the
Mexican Flora": Rm 1139,, Natural Sci-
ence Bldg.
8:00 p.m.-President Lincoln's Eman-
cipation Proclamation Centennial Pro-
gram-Marilyn Mason, Organ Prelude;
Dwight L. Dumond, Professor of History,
"The Emancipation Proclamation: Free-
dom in the Fullness of Time"; and
Men's Glee Club, Philip A. Duey, con-
ductor: Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Faculty
Recital-Oliver Edel, cellist; and Henry
Harris, guest pianist: Rackham Lecture
Hall.
8:00 p.m.-U-M Players present the
new Paul Mayer translation of Luigi
Pirandello's "Six Characters in Search
of an Author" at Trueblood Aud., Frieze
Bldge. Tickets $1.50, 1.00 for Wed.,
Thur.; $1.75, 1.25 for Fri., Sat. Box
office open from 12:30 dal.
Botanical Seminar-Dr. Jerry Rzed-
owski, Mexico, D.F., Mevico will speak
on "The Endemis Element in the Mexi-
AT 1:10-3:35
Friday 6:10 and 8:45
Feature 10 mins. later
TT'ERTAINMENT IS

f.

Dial
2-6264

can Flora.'I' On Wed., Jan. 9 at 4:15
p.m. in 1139 Natural Science Bldg. Tea
will be served at 4:00.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture by Bill Starr of Young Life Clubs
of America, Jan. 11, 1963, 7:30 p.m.
Union, 3 KLMN.
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. Univ. Ave., Ann
Arbor. Orders for Midyear Graduation
Exercises should be placed immediately.
Events
University Lecture: Jan. 10, 8:30 p.m.,
Rm. 1300, Chem. Bldg. Dr. Riley Schaef-
fer (Prof. of Inorganic Chemistry, In-
diana Univ.) will speak on "Higher
Boranes: Mechanisms and Synthesis."
Lecture: Philip Will Jr., Fellow of the
American Institute of Architects and
past president of the national body,
will give a lecture in the Architectural
Aud. on Thurs., Jan. 10 at 3:00 p.m.
His subject will be "The Am, Inst. of
Archts. with Reference to Education
and Training of the Practitioner." The
public is invited.
On Thurs., Jan. 10, at 4:10 p.m. in the
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg., the Dept.
of Speech, Student Laboratory Theatre
will present two original plays, "The
Christening" by James Harris Jr., and
"Piers and Pilings" by Ted Rancont
Jr. Both plays were written for Prof.
Rowe's playwrighting course in the Dept.
of English and will receive their first
production under the direction of grad
student Herbert Propper. Admission is
free.
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics:
Miss V. H. Patti will speak on "The
Behrens-Fisher Distribution" at 4 p.m.,
Jan. 10 in Rm. 3201 Angell Hall.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
M. Sichel, Aeronautical Engrg., will
speak on "Structure of Weak Non-
Hugonist Shock Waves," Thurs., Jan.
10, at 4:00 p.m. in Rm. 246 W. Engrg.

Refreshments will be served in Rm.
350 W. Engrg. at 3,:30 p.m.
The Jan. meeting of the Graduate
Student Council will be held Thurs.,
Jan. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the W. Con-
ference Rm., fourth floor of the Rack-
ham Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for Budd Leslie
Gambee, Jr., Library Science; thesis:
"Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper,
1855-1860: Artistic and Technical Opera-
tions of a Pioneer Pictorial News Week-
ly in America," Thurs., Jan. 10, 10 Gen.
Lib., at 3:00 p.m. Chairman, R. L. Kil-
gour.
Professional Theatre Program: "The
Fantasticks," the internationily suc-
cessful off-Broadway musical, will be
presented at Trueblood Aud., Jan. 15
through Jan. 20, The New York produc-
tion of this whimsical, romantic musi-
cal is being brought to Ann Arbor by
the Professional Theatre Program. Tick-
ets for "The Fantasticks" are on sale
beginning today at the Trueblood box
office in the Frieze Bldg. All APA mem-
bers are entitled to 20 per cent discount.
Evening performances begin at 8:30
Tues. through Sat. Matinee perform-
ances begin at 2:30 on Thurs., Sat. and
Sun.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
General Electric Co., Fort Wayne, Ind.
'DIAL 8-6416

-Computer Program Technician in
Engrg. Section. BS in Engrg. Must be
Math major.
Inland Steel Corp., East Chicago, Ind.
-Openings for Metallurgists and Elec-
trical Engnrs. Male or female. Degree
required. Exper. not necessary for
trainees; advanced degree & exper. for
highly qualified positions. Job areas:
Mill Operations Trainees; Res. & Dev.;
Quality Control; Electrical Dept.
Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N.Y.-
Many & various openings including:
Engnrs. (Chem., Elect., Indust., Mech.,
& Met.); Chemists; Physicists & Engrg.
Physicists; Accountants; Bus. Ad./ con.;
Indust. Mgmt./Admin.; Marketing;
Math; Stat.; General Liberal Arts. Posi-
tions are at the beginning professional
level & will be of interest to persons
with up to 3 yrs. exper.
E U R OP E
Before you go discover this
low-cost unregimented tour.
unless a conventional local
tour is a "must," write to:
EUROPE SUMMER TOURS
255-B Sequoia Pasadena, Cal.
ENDS TONIGHT
"PEEPING
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OPENING
To

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PERFORMANCES THRU SAT. --8:00 TRUEBLOOD AUD., F.B.

Archer Daniels Midland Co., Minneap-
olis, Minn.-Operations Research An-
alyst. BS in Chem. Engrg. Specialized
O.R. course work very desirable. Prefer
mid-yr. grads or alumni avail. now, but
will consider June grads also.
American Society of Tool & Mfg. Mag-
azine, Detroit, Mich.-Assistant Editor.
BS in Engrg., preferably ME. For one
who is interested in becoming an edi-
tor. Must have desire to do editorial
(Continued on Page 5)

PRICES: Tues., Wed. & Thurs. Eves. (8:30 p.m.) and Thurs., Sat,
& Sun. Matinees (2:30 p.m.) : Orch. $3.00, $2.50; Balc. $2.50, $2.00,
$1.50. Fri. & Sat. Eves. (8:30 p.m.): $3.50, $3.00; Balc. $3.00,
$2.50, $2.00. ALL APA MEMBERS-20% DISCOUNT.

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U PLAYERS
Department of Speech
present I-F

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1 A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE 'A DING PE LAURENTIS ROU CION
TTECHNI C LOROTECHMPPAMAO. ..

STARTING THURSDAY A
.4AN ELEGANT, VEXATIOUS GUESSING GAME."
-Crowther, N.Y. Times
THE GIRL.-WITH. THE GOLDEN IYES
Starring MARIE LAFORFT
mdFRANCOISE PREVOST

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