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January 06, 1963 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-01-06

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JANUARY 6> 196

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE r

JANUARY C. i┬žSS THE MICHIGAN flATlY PAGE P
S S

Proclamation
Vie Gan

Observance Setl

Of Negroes
'In Century
Racial Problems
Still Plague U.S.
When Abraham Lincoln became
the 16th President of the United
States on March 4, 1961, nearly
four million Negroes were held as
slaves in this country, under a
system considered by some to have
been the Southern plantation
economy.
Slavery was legal in fifteen of
the 34 states of the Union. Within
a few weeks after Lincoln took
office, eleven slaveholding states
had declared secession from the
United States and had established
the Confederate States of America.
Civil war began in the struggle to
bring these Southern states back
under the jurisdiction of Federal
law.
Lincoln's primary purpose, his-
torians now feel, was not to free
the slaves, but rather to preserve
the Union. In his famous debates
with Sen. Stephen Douglas,, Lin-
coln had declared that he was "in
no way in favor of the political and
social equality of the white and
black races," and for more than a
year he resisted demands that he
initiate aggressive action against
slavery. Hefeared that such ac-
tion might cause the border states
to secede to the Confederacy.
Personal Conviction
By the summer of 1862, however,
several considerations had moved
him to act; among them, histor-
ians feel, certain personal convic-
tions against slavery which had
been reinforced.
Growing sentiment in the North,
voiced by many radical Republican
members of Congress, demanded
immediate emancipation, which
would hopefully cripple the econo-
my of the South and provide Union
troops with additional soldiers.
Secondly, it was feared that
Great Britain and France would
grant diplomatic recognition and
possibly aid to the South. The
British and French people were
opposed to slavery, although their
governments were friendly to the
South, and it was hoped that these.
nations might be won to sympathy
with the Union cause if the Fed-
eral government clearly announced
its intention to free the slaves.
Offers Draft
Once the course of emancipation
had been fully determined, Lin-
coln submitted a draft of the
proclamation to his Cabinet. Sec-
retary of State William H. Seward
suggested that action officially
declaring emancipation should
wait until the war, then running
strongly against the Union forces,
should turn to their advantage.
Lincoln agreed, and therefore it
was not until Sept. 22, five days
after the Confederate invasion of
the North had been turned back
at Antietam, that the decision
was made public on his official
authority.
He then issued a preliminary
proclamation declaring that on
Jan. 1, 1963, all persons held as
slaves in states or parts of states
still in rebellion, should be "then,
thenceforward, and forever free."
Slaves Free
On the appointed day he signed
the document now known as the
'Emancipation Proclamation, and
all slaves in territories still in re-
rolt were formally declared free.
The Emancipation Proclamation
helped greatly to strengthen the
position of the government in the
North and lkewise went far to-
ward assuring that Great Britain
and France would not recognize
the Confederacy as a separate and
independent nation. As the Union
forces extended their penetration

southward, enforced obedience to
the proclamation brought freedom
to the slaves of occupied territor-
ies, some of whom did join the
Union armies.
Later, on Dec. 18, 1865, the 13th
amendment to the Constitution
abolished the institution of slavery
throughout the whole of the
United States.
Free Citizen
The position of the Negro as a
constitutionally free citizen in the
social and political life of the
nation has continued to be a seri-
ous problem of national and inter-
national significance ever since.
The Supreme Court decision of
1954 abolishing racial segregation
in public schools, the subsequent
crisis-in Little Rock, ultimately in-
volving the use of federal troops
to enforce that ruling, the killings
of Emmett Till and Matt Parker,
Mississippi Negroes, and the recent
case of James A. Meredith's entry
with federal military backing into
the University of Mississippi, are
often cited among the incidents
illustrative of a continuing un-
willingness to grant the Negro a
position of social equality with
whites.
The burning of Negro homes and
churches, sit-in demonstrations

JANUARY 1, 1863-A Union soldier reads the Emancipation Proclamation to a Negro family just 100 years ago. President Lincoln had
read the document to the members of his cabinet some months beforehand, and it became official on Jan. 1. This characterization will
appear on the University's program for the centennial observance.
The Emancipation Proclamation

By the
President of the United States
of America
A Proclamation
Whereas, on the twenty-second
day of September, in the year of
our Lord one thousand, eight hun-
dred and sixty-two, a proclamation
was issued by the President of the
United States, containing, among
other things, the following, to
wit:
That on the first day of Janu-
ary, in the year of our Lord one
thousand eight hundred and sixty-
three, all persons held as slaves
within any State or designated
part of a State, the people where-
of shall then be in rebellion
against the United States, shall
be then, thenceforward, and for-
ever free; and the Executive Gov-
ernment of the United States, in-
cluding the military and naval
authority thereof, will recognize
~9
A~uI

by members chosen thereto at(
elections wherein a majority off
the qualified voters of such State
shall have participated, shall, in1
the absence of strong countervail-
ing testimony, be deemed conclus-i
ive evidence that such State, and
the people thereof, are not then ini
rebellion against the United States.i
Now, therefore I, Abraham Lin-
coln, President of the United
States, by virtue of the power inI
me vested as Commander-in-Chief,i
of the Army and Navy ofd the
United States in time of actual+
armed rebellion against the au-
thority and government of the+
United States, and as a fit and
necessary war measuredfor sup-
pressing said rebellion, do, on the
first day of January, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and sixty-three, and in
accordance with my purpose to do
so publicly proclaim for the full
period of one hundred days, from
the day first above mentioned,
order and designate as the States
and parts of States wherein the
people thereof respectively, are
this day in rebellion against the
United States, the following, to
wit.
Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (ex-
cept the parishes of St. Bernard,
Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John,
St. Charles, St. James Ascension
and Assumption, Terrebonne, La-
fourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and
Orleans, including the city of New
Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama
Florida, Georgia, South Carolina,
North Carolina, and Virginia, (ex-
cept the forty-eight counties des-
ignated as West Virginia, and
also the counties of Berkley, Ac-
comac, Northampton, Elizabeth
City, York, Princess Ann, and Nor-
folk, including the cities of Nor-
folk and Portsmouth, and which
excepted parts are, for the present,
left precisely as if this proclama-
tion were not issued.
And by virtue of the power, and
for the purpose aforesaid, I do
order and declare that all persons
held as slaves within said desig-
nated States, and parts of States,
are, and hence forward shall be
free; and that the Executive gov-
ernment of the United States, in-
cluding the military and naval au-
thorities thereof, will recognize
and maintain the freedom of said
person.
And I hereby enjoin upon the
people so declared to be free to
abstain from all violence, unless
in necessary self-defense, and I
recommend to them, that, in all

cases when allowed, they labor
faithfully for reasonable wages.
And I further declare and make
known, that such persons of suit-
able condition, will be received
into the armed service of the
United States to garrison forts,
positions, stations, and other
places, and to man vessels of all,
sorts in said service.
And upon this act, sincerely be-
lieved to be an act of justice, war-
ranted by the Constitution, upon
military necessity, I invoke the
considerate judgment of mankind,
and the gracious favor of Almighty
God.

In witness whereof, I have here-
unto set my hand and caused the
seal of the United States to be
affixed.
Done at the city of Washington,
this first day of January, in the
year of our Lord one thousand
eight hundred and sixty-three, and
of the Independence of the United
States of America the eighty-
seventh.
Abraham Lincoln
By the President:r
William N. Seward,
Secretary of State.

Cites Goals
Of Proj ect
On Peoples
By THOMAS DRAPER
"The general purpose of the re-
search project 'The Empty Areas
of South America' will be to map
and study the regions of South
America that have practically no
population," Prof. Ross N. Pearson
of the geography department said
recently.
Prof. Pearson has recently re-
ceived a grant from the graduate
school for this project.
Although some of the empty
areas are swamps, mountainous
regions and deserts, many places
may be capable of supporting
large numbers of people, he noted.
These regions are not settled eith-
er because they are inaccessible or
the people do not want to move
from the place where they were
born.
Population Absorption
Prof. Pearson said that he would
investigate these underpopulated
regions which may be able to ab-
sorb the population from over-
crowded areas of the world.
"With large empty areas, you
would expect movement from the
highly populated to the less dense-
ly populated areas," he explained.
"However, movement is from the
rural areas to the cities." The proj-
ect will include an investigation
of this phenomena.
Prof. Pearson noted an increas-
ing interest in South America. He
said that the availability of grants
may increase due to the present
federal administration.
Movement Map
Prof. Pearson said that he would
like to study the movement to
cities, by making a map of the
empty areas around 1930.
He hopes to have the mapping
done by the end of this summer.
L a t i n America's population
growth rates, presently averaging
about two and a half per cent a
year, are among the world's high-
est, he added.
View asNeeds
Of Training'
By EDWARD HERSTEIN,
The community college has tre-
mendous potential for developing
much-needed technical education
programs, Prof. Ralph C. Wenrich
of the education school said re-
cently.
Speaking before a meeting of
the American Technical Education
Association, Prof. Wenrich review-
ed conditions which must exist if
technical education is to be devel-
oped in a community college.
"The community which supports
the college must be clearly com-
mitted to the idea of providing oc-
cupationally-oriented programs for
those youths who are not planning
to go on to a four-year college and
for adults already employed in the
community," he explained.
Major Task
The administration and the fac-
ulty must accept as the institu-
tion's major task, the goal of pre-
paring youth for employment and
of serving the occupational train-
ing needs of employed youths and
adults, he said.
"The internal administrative
structure must be able to facilitate
development'of both college-paral-
lel and occupationally-oriented
programs," Prof. Wenrich added.
He said that administrative and
supervisory offices must be staffedc
with specialists who understand
occupational education and whc

have responsibility for developing
and operating occupational edu.
cation programs.
Continuous Development
"Provision must be made in th
administrative structure for con.
tinuous curriculum development
They must be continuously evalu.
ated, revised when necessary, am
dropped when there is no longer f
need."
Policies regarding student selec
tion must be carefully developer
and rigidly followed. Admission in
to technical and other occupation
ally-oriented programs should bi
based upon high, but realistic
standards. These standards woul
not be the same for all technica
programs, Prof. Wenrich said.
"Placement services as inten
sive as those provided for college
bound youth must be made avail
able to employment-bound youth.
Adequate Finances
The community college mus
have an adequaterfinancial base
d and it must be recognized tha
l occupationally - oriented program
are generally more expensive thai
the college-parallel ones. State ai
and student fees as well as loca
e taxes can be used to support th
e college.
1. "The community college musi
of course, provide adequate facili
ties, and it must maintain and fur
e ther develop community relation;
e especially with the economic inter
ests of the community."
e Notes Degree
dP
.t retg

FOR SALE
MUST SELL - Diamond engagement
ring. Never worn. Call 3-5138. B29
GLEE CLUB RECORDS ON SALE TO-
DAY IN THE FISHBOWL.
LARGE, HEAVY-DUTY wooden tables,
suitable for housing unit dining or
private work tables. Call Don Mae-
ritebie, 5-9193. B21
HELP WANTED
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES-Diamond
office. Prestige business. Low over-
head. Excellent profits. Small invest-
ment. Present owner will train. Box
102, Michigan Daily. H49
A PROFESSIONAL CAREER in less than
a year. Come in or call and we will
show you how you can make up to
$20,000 a year in one of the fastest
growing professions. No layoffs in
this work,
PRESTON'S BEAUTY ACADEMY
338 S. State (upstairs over
the Charcoal House)
8-9693. H51
FOR RENT
SINGLE 2 room apt. on Hill. Free 27th
of January. Contact Sue Jenkins,
663-6607. C27
TOO MANY ROOMATES DESTROY AN
APARTMENT. Tiffany apts., Packard
near Sstate is designed exclusively to
meet the requirements of individuals
who appreciate the value of privacy.
Before you decide on an apartment
you owe it to yourself to hear the
Tiffany story. A few units are still
available for Feb. 1 occupancy. Sun-
day and Evenings call NO 3-8866, and
weekdays call NO 5-0637. C35
APARTMENT available for Jan. 27.
Suitable for 1 or 2. 663-1692. C40
FOR RENT: four man apartment. On
campus-1010 Monroe. NO 3-4562. C21
TWO MEN wanted for modern furnished
three-bedroom apartment. Call Allan
or Jim, NO 5-0112. C23
HURON TOWER APT. Studio apt. fur-
nished. Available Jan. 22. $136 per
month. Call 5-3516. C24
FOR RENT-Four-man apartment. On
campus, 1010 Monroe. Call NO 3-4562.
C21

CLAS SIFIED'S

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Before Christmas -- Small red
plaid overnight bag with books. Help!
Reward. NO 5-7711, ext. 3239. A17
LOST- Light brown glasses, orange
case. 333 Mosher, NO 3-1561, Ext. 1041.
A12
PERSONAL
To the CUP CRUSHER:
Remember, mum's the wordr.
The Executive Council of the F.^.C.
F14
FOR EXPERT ADVICE on weight losing
contact El Bloto, NO 5-9175. F13
WANTED-A ride to New York City or
thereabouts Jan. 24 or 25. Will share
expanses and driving. Please call Mar-
gie Brahms at 2-2591. F7
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORPORATION --
"where marginal prices buy quality
diamonds!" 1209 S. University. 663-
7151. F43
WANTED: A ride to New York City or
thereabouts Jan. 24 or 25. Will share
expenses and driving. Please call
Margie Brahms at 2-2591. F7
WANT TO ESCAPE? Try art. Try Gen
eration staff. We need you. For infor-
mation call John Herrick, editor, NO
3-2273 or NO 2,3241. You too can
speak for your generation. F11
To My LAMMA
Let's go back . . . I cannot stand
this . . . Help Help Help
From the Lamma's Mama
Middle Class Morals Anyone? F11

ROOMMATE WANTED for apt, with
garage, T.V. Near Campus, roomy.
2-1026. 020
ONE OR TWO GIRLS wanted to share
apartment with 2 other girls 1 block
from campus. $40 per month. Call NO
2-9819. C22
ROOMMATE WANTED for apt. with
garage, TV. Near campus, roomy. NO
2-1026. C20
APARTMENT -- Four room first floor,
large fenced yard, garage, unfur-
nished except stove and refrigerator.
$90 per month. NO 2-4684.r 19
1326 GEDDES (Geddes near Forest).
New 2-bedroom apt. completely furn-
ished. $185. Call NO 3-8866. Mr. Skol-
nik. 016
"ECONOMY AND PRIVACY"-Tiffany
apts., Packard near State. Regal ac-
commodations for parties of all sizes.
Some apts. still available for Feb. 1
occupancy. Call NO 3-8866 for further
information. C25
2 14-story towers overlooking Huron
River. Game Room. Swimming Pool.,
Balconies and covered parking. St'-
dio, 1, 2, 3-bedrooms. $113-312.
HURON TOWERS
2200 Fuller Road
NO 3-0800 NO 5-9162
014
STUDENTS
Several apartments available to
share in campus area
APARTMENTS. LIMITED
NO 3-0511 Evenings
NO 5-9271 C45
ACT NOW
Studios from $111.00
1-bedroom from $130.00-
Bus transportation to campus
and Ann Arbor business district.
HURON TOWERS
NO 3-0800, NO 5-9162
NEW NEW NEW
Will lease to June
TIFFANY APARTMENTS
736 Packard
2 person occupancy $135 per month
3 person occupancy $145 per month
Includes parking space, all fur-
nished, carpeting, drapes, TV, air
conditioning, and continuous music.
Available February 1st.

THE MICHIGAN FRESHMAN
Life is great.
Heavy date.
Paper late.
Procrastinate.
Girls who mate.
School I hate.
Inevitable fate:
MICHIGAN STATE.
F12
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED -- Two-mian apartment on
campus for next semester. Call Mur-
ray or Craw at 2-5571. IA
GARAGE WANTED
Vicinity of Canterbury Rd., Ann Arbor
Woods, John Allen School or South-
east Ann Arbor area. Phone NO 5-9429
after 5 p.m.
TRANSPORTATION
Drive Yourself..
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes,
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
59 Ecorse Road
Ypsilanti, Michigan
USED-CARS
56 PONTIAC FOR SALE. Call Craw
2-5571. N8
'55 2-DR. CHEV. Good clean car, stand-
ard trans. $325. HU 2-9425.
MUSICAL MDSE.
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GUITARS ETC.
Make, Repair, Buy and Sell
Private and Group Instruction
Hoots Daily
Herb David Guitar Studio
209 SO. STATE
NO 5-8001
S5
HI-FIDELITY FM TUNER, 14 watt am-
plifier. 2 speakers, separate enclosures.
$100. Chuck. NO 5-0350.: X10
FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY on
radios, phonos, tape recorders and TVs
with this ad. Campus Radio & TV,
325 E. Hoover. X9
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
' Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
MISCELLANEOUS
,NEED A BITE TO EAT?
Time for Sunday breakfast and
the kitchen is bare?
Dash to
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
We open at 8 Sunday morning.
BARGAIN CORNER
LEVIS-SLIM FITS
$4.25-for men and ladies. Slim &
Slack. Smart, Rugged Twill. "White,"
black, loden, light blue, cactus. Big-
gest Levi stock in town.
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

DWIGHT DUMOND LANGSTON HUGHES
... keynote address . . . Negro poet
Three Day Program Set
To Fete Emancipation

ABRAHAM LINCOLN
... "forever free'

and maintain the freedom of such
persons, and will do no act or acts
to repress such persons, or any of
them, in any efforts they may
make for their actual freedom.
That the Executive will, on the
first day of January aforesaid, by
proclamation, designate the States
and parts of States, if any, in
which the people thereof, respect-
ively, shall then be in rebellion
against the United States; and
the fact that any state, or the
people thereof, shall on that day,
be, in good faith, represented in
the Congress of the United States

Highlighting the University's
three-day observance of the cen-
tennial of the signing of the
Emancipation Proclamation, Prof.
Dwight L. Dumond of the history
department will deliver the key-
note address entitled "The Eman-
cipation Proclamation: Freedom
in the Fullness of Time."
Prof. Dumond, a noted Civil
War historian, is the author of
the highly-regarded book, "Anti-
Slavery."
The program, beginning on Tues-
day, will open at 4:15 p.m. in Aud.
A, when noted American Negro

CENTURY OBSERVANCE:
Hatcher Lauds American Negroes

poet Langston Hughes will pre-I
sent "I, too, sing America," a read-
ing of his works with commentary,
On Wednesday, the main pro-
gram will be presented at 8 p.m.
in Hill Aud., when Prof. Dumond
will deliver his address.
Prof. Marilyn Mason of the mu-
sic school will present the organ
prelude, and University President
Harlan Hatcher will introduce
Prof. Dumond.
The program will be concluded
as Prof. Philip A. Duey of the mu-
sic school condudcts the Men's
Glee Club singing Negro spirituals
including There is a Balm in
Gilead, Witness, Ain't Got Time
to Die and The Battle Hymn of
the Republic.
Thursday's presentation will be
an address by President Emeritus
Mordecai W. Johnson of Howard
University at Washington. He will
speak at 4:15 in Aud A on "Mod-
ern Progress in Civil Rights."
Prof. John Bowditch of the his-
tory department chaired the
arrangements committee for the
program, assisted by Dean John A
Flower of the music school,Uni-
versity Librarian Frederick H.
Wagman, Prof. Joe L. Davis of the
English department, Prof. George
A. Peek of the political science de-
partment, Prof. F. Clever Bald of
the history department, Mary
Wheeler, '64L, Michigan League
President Margaret Skiles, '63, and
Michigan Union President Robert

Dale and Associates, Inc.,
REALTORS
NO 5-0637
018

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Dissertation or thesis ready
for typing? For fast, accurate and
economical service by typists familiar
with graduate school requirements
contact Ann Arbor Typing and Print-
ing Service, 117 S. Main St., Ann
Arbor or call 663-2587. J9
FOR THE FINEST SELECTION of party
favors and unique gifts contact Bud-
Mor Agency, 110 S. University, NO
2-6362. J4
MANUSCRIPTS, TERM PAPERS typed,
Multilth Offset for reproduction,
Photo copy, mailings. Gretxinger's
Business Service, 320 S. Huron. HU
2-0191 J
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, medi-
cal, legal, technical conferences,
mimeographing, offset. Quick, accu-
rate, experienced. Professional Service
Associates, 334 Catherine. J11
REAL ESTATE
HUNDRED feet Lake Michigan frontage
north of Frankfort. Available only to
U of M personnel. Cost $2750. For de-
tails write P. O. Box 75, Ann Arbor.
R2

Marking the centennial celebra-
tion of the signing of the Eman-
cipation Proclamation, University
President Harlan Hatcher has
lauded the American Negro for
his struggle to secure a full mea-
sure of citizenship that has lasted
for 100 years.
In this struggle the Negro "has
been the champion of the rights of
all citizens, black or white, and of
the true meaning and dignity of
our republic," President Hatcher
declared, as the University pre-
pared to mark a three-day observ-
a- .,,f +rf e ntannn,1o 11inninn'

phy that civil rights would come
naturally if the Negro minded his
own business and attended to his
duties had proved inadequate and
ill-founded."
He claimed that the American
Negro owes much to former Presi-
dent Abraham Lincoln; "as much,
however, and perhaps more, he
owes to those who came after,
those who were inspired by Lin-
coln's action."
The President observed that
"education has long been the
spearhead in the Negroes' drive
for equality." He recalled that the

U-M
FUN LAN
ANN ARBOR
2 blocks to athletic fields, 3 blocks
to campus, 5 blocks to theatres, 1/
block to party store. A new co-edu-
cational apartment building for 2,
3, 4, or 5 person occupancy. Fur-
nished are covered parking, televi-

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