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December 15, 1962 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TUBE

Y

Urge NATO To Abandon

IPlans for

Nuclear

U.S. To Retain Military Bases

By The Associated Press
GENEVA - The United States
declared yesterday it will main-
tain its "ring" of military bases
around the Soviet Union until dis-
armament has reached its final
phase..
United States Ambassador Ar-
thur H. Dean told the 17-nation
Disarmament Conference the Unit-
ed States is treaty-bound to de-
fend the Western world against
any possible Soviet aggression, and
cannot discard its nuclear deter-
rent power and foreign bases in
the early stages of a disarmament
treaty.
Dean made this declaration in
a concise reiteration of the Amer-
ican position on disarmament.
Approves Statement
British Minister of State Jo-
seph B. Godber noted that he
welcomed and approved of the
American statement as "extremely
useful, timely and necessary."
Dean's speech coincided with
United States Defense Secretary.
Robert S. McNamara's warning at
the Paris meeting of the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization that
NATO's military strength must be
increased to meet Soviet superior-
ity in conventional forces and
arms.
The American negotiator de-
scribed American bases as "an es-
sential component of the present-
clay world military picture."
He said the bases would be elim-
inated at the end of the proposed
disarmament process, but that the
Western powers will not permit

themselves to be led into "palpalbly
one-sided moves at the beginning
of disarmament which favor the
Soviet Bloc and jeopardize free.
world security."
Notes Demands
Dean referred to Soviet demands
for elimination of nuclear deliv-
ery vehicles and foreign military
bases at the beginning of disarm-
ament.
Soviet delegate Semyon K.
Tsarapkin said Dean's statement
was "a strange thing to hear in
such a conference.
"The Soviet Union will fight ths
approach."
He promised a full reply would
be made later during the session.
Dean said the United States
government is equally bound by
its national interest and treaty
commitments, and by its pledge to
work towards general and com-
plete disarmament.
"The key to our position is that

we will agree to adopt only those
measures which preserve the safe-
ty of the United States and its
associates.
"We will not accept obligations
in the disarmament field which
diminish total free world security,"
he explained.
The issue of bases arose during
the recent Cuban crisis. Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev of-
fered to swap Russian bases in
Cuba for American bases in
Turkey.
President John F. Kennedy re-
fused, declaring that the Ameri-
can bases were defensive while
the Cuban installations were an
offensive violation of the status
quo.
The abolition of foreign bases
has long been considered a first
step to disarmament by various
peace groups. They surmise that
the elimination of these installa-
tions will reduce tensions.

World News Roundup.
By The Associated Press
MIAMI-More than 20,000 workmen plunged yesterday into the
massive, hurry-up job of harvesting Florida's frozen citrus fruit be-
fore it deteriorates beyond the point of salvage. Preliminary surveys
indicated the damage was greater than in the bad winter of 1957-58,
when 30,000 boxes of fruit froze on the trees.
* * * *

UNITED NATIONS-Secretary
eral Assembly yesterday to exten(

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
sponsors a
CHRISTMAS PARTY
TONIGHT at the International Center
8:00 p.m.-1 :00 a.m.
Members: Free ! Non-members: 50c
BRING A MODEST GIFT-about 25c
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Presents
"A HANUKA IN ISRAEL"
Featuring
1. The NAG ILA DANCERS of H I LLEL
2. A Hanuka Sing
3. A Special DRAMATIC PRESENTATION
4. LATKES
TOMORROW, SUNDAY, DEC. 16, at 3 P.M.
All are Welcome 1429 Hill St.

y-General U Thant asked the Gen-
d until next June 30 the date for
marketing United Nations bonds
in the hope the entire $200-million
issue may be sold. He noted that
when all current pledges to buy
are fulfilled the total of purchases
will reach $148.7 million.
LUSAKA, Northern Rhodesia -
Formation of Northern Rhodesia's
first government withAfrican
members was announced last
night. Kenneth Kaunda, leader of
the African Nationalist United Na-
tional Independence party was ap-
pointed minister of local govern-
ment and social welfare. Harry
Nkumbula, president of the Afri-
can National Congress, was nam-
ed minister of African education.
WASHINGTON - The govern-
ment recessed bargaining talks in
the Atlantic-Gulf Coast longshore
labor dispute last night and sched-
uled a resumption in New York on
Monday. Secretary of Labor W.
Willard Wirtz spent four hours
talking to representatives cf the
New York Shipping Association
and the AFL-CIO International
Longshoremen's Association.
* * *
NEW YORK-Bertram A. Pow-
ers, leader of a week-old printers
strike that has closed New York's
nine major newspapers, yesterday
rejected a plan for a 60-day truce
in the walkout.
WASHINGTON-Industrial pro-
duction in November held steady
at the near-record October level
of 119.5 per cent of the 1957-59
average, the Federal Reserve Board
reported yesterday. Automobile
production still was running far
ahead of the rest of the index of
factory, utility, and mining activ-
ity.
* * - .

Forces
McNamara,
Rusk Ask
For Change
Request Allies Use,
Conventional Arms
PARIS (P)-The United States
told its European allies yesterday
to stop wasting cash on independ-
ent national nuclear forces. and to
put more money instead into sore-
ly needed conventional armament.
United States Defense Secre-
tary Robert S. McNamara and
Secretary of State Dean Rusk told
the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-
nization Council that future Com-
munist threats are much more
likely to be in the non-nuclear do-
main, chiefly because of the shield
of superior American nuclear pow-
er.
But they recognized the politi-
cal aspect of nuclear armament,
particularly in Britain and France,
and offered to help Western Eu-
rope buld a nuclear force of its
own if the Europeans themselves
can work out multi-national poli-
tical control and share the enor-
mous costs.
Cool Reaction
Council sources sad the initial
reaction from other ma isters was
cool. Bmtain and France are de-
termined to build their own nu-
clear forces.i
Others said their governments
could not stretch defense budgets
any more.
McNamara and .Rusk said the
West desperately needs the "cut-
ting edge" or sword of convention-
al power to give the Allied coi-
manders a far-reaching choice of
response in any future crisis.
Cuban Lesson
This, they said, is one important
lesson of the Cuban incident.
McNamara, in a lengthy review
of the Allied military situation,
said the West already possesses
adequate nuclear deterrent.
He implied that other individ-
ual national nuclear forces would
only drain needed resources from
NATO'S inadequate conventional
strength.
But McNamara said this: The
United States is deeply interested
in having the nuclear shield so
managed that all members of
NATO have full confidence in its
effectiveness and reliability. The
United States feels that no single
member can or should attempt to
monopolize the responsibility and
authority for resort to nuclear
warfare.
Rusk described the multi-nation-
al nuclear force as a seaborne arm,
wielding medium-range ballistic
missiles.
UN -Approves
Call for Space
Cooperation
UNITED NATIONS () - The
General Assembly approved unan-
imously yesterday a resolution
sponsored by the United States,
the Soviet Union and' 22 other
countries calling for increased in-
ternational cooperation in the
peaceful uses of outer space.
The draft urged member states
to cooperate in space research pro-
grms using satellites for weather
forecasting and a world wide tele-

communications system.
It also noted with regret that
no progress has been made on the
drafting of a legal code to govern
the exploration of outer space and
asked the United Nations space
committee to continue on an ur-
gent basis its efforts to draft such
a legal code.

Leaders Meet
Over Alliance
PARIS (R)-British Prime Min-
ister Harold Macmillan arrived
yesterday for two days of informal
talks with F r e n c h President
Charles de Gaulle in a hunting
lodge outside Paris.
Out of the sessions could come
the beginnings of a new French-
British alliance.
The British leader is scheduled
to meet de Gaulle first thing this
morning to discuss numerous is-
sues including Britain's trouble
getting into the European Com-
mon Market and the problems over
the Skybolt missile.
After his meeting with de Gaulle,
Macmillan will fly to Nassau in
the Bahamas for talks with Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy and, later,
with Canadian Prime Minister
John Diefenbaker.
As Macmillan flew in here, Brit-
ish informants spread word of
what they called a de Gaulle
scheme to sponsor a new inter-
continental free trade area, cov-
ering most of the Western world.
British informants described it
this way:
France would remain at the
head of the Common Market, lead-
ing West Europe. Britain would re-
tain her ties with her European
and Commonwealth partners, ful-
filling her old maritime role. The
United States would participate by
implementing, the bold new trade
expansion act.

HAROLD MACMILLAN
... meets with de Gaulle

COMECON CONVENES:
Soviets Begin Session
On Economy Problems
VIENNA (P)-The Soviet Bloc's Council for Mutual Economic As-
sistance-COMECON-opened a session in Bucharest yesterday that
may set up a planning and administrative staff to combat pressure
from the European Common Market.
The meeting was convened on the initiative of Poland which is
believed to be feeling the weight of Western Europe's Common Mar-
ket more than the other East Bloc members.
Polish Vice-Premier Piotr Jaroszewicz, who is in charge of eco-
nomic cooperation, in a statement Thursday said the meeting will

JAZZ ON CAMPUS
Tomorrow Night See
THE BOB JAMES* TRIO
in their last Ann Arbor concert appearance
8:00 P.M. Tickets $1.25
Michigan Union on sale at the
Ballroom Michigan Union and at the door

make changes in COMECON's
constitution which will set up a
planning and administrative organ,
similar to the Common Market's
secretariat, to centralize control
of production throughout the East
Bloc.
He said the meeting would also
consider a coordinated campaign
to reorganize Communist agricul-
ture and streamline fiscal affairs,
including the breaking of bottle-
necks in currency clearings.
Specific actions by the execu-
tive committee following the coun-
cil meeting will deal with bloc-wide
coordination of roller bearing pro-
duction and creation of a pool of
freight cars, he added.
Bucharest radio said delegates
are present from all the member
countries--the Soviet Union, East
Germany, Hungary, Romania, Bul-
garia and Mongolia, as well as Po-
land and Czechoslovakia. Albania
apparently has been dropped as a
member as a result of the dispute
between Soviet Russia and Red
China.
The broadcast did not mention
Cuba..

State Mobilizes
Guard Troops
To Fight Snow
By The Associated Press
The worst December snowstorms
in the state's history prompted the
mobilization of Michigan National
Guard troops to help isolated com-
munities and stranded motorists
Thursday night.
Officials in Western Michigan,
hardest hit by the heavy snow
storms, asked the civil defense of-
fice to declare it a disaster area,
since some 65,000 children were
sent home from school in Kent'
and Muskegon Counties.
Fifty inches of snow has fallen
along the coastal areas of Lake
Michigan. Winds of up to 40 miles
per hour have whipped the snow
into drifts which have often made
roads impassable. Temperatures
have dropped as low as five below.

Report Red
Movements
From India
NEW DELHI U/P)-The Chinese
handed over more wounded and
sick Indian prisoners yesterday,
and the government of Indian
PrimetMinistercJawaharlal Nehru
gave the first cautious confirma-
tion that Communist invasion
troops are pulling back in north-
east India.
Peking had announced that the
withdrawal around Bomdila, one
of the major prizes captured by
the Chinese in their drive over the
Himalayas, started last Sunday.
Nehru has expressed wariness
about Peking's intentions but a
government spokesman said "ac-
cording to our information .
there are no Chinese" below Dhi-
rang Dzong or Walong.
From Dhirang Dzong the Chi-
nese had driven south to seize
Bomdila and reach the last range
of hills before the Assam Plains.
From Walong they advanced 80
miles down the Luhit River toward
the plains.
They were among the Commu-
nists' major marches across the
Himalayas and a clear-out here
would mark a significant with-
drawal. Peking broadcasts have
made no mention of the situation
along the western part of the fron-
tier.
The Indian army, fearful of pro-
voking the Chinese by sending out
patrols, have been relying on Red
Cross and unofficial reports for
confirmation of the Chinese claims
they are living up to their bargain.

rcAE

7ro

Cr~ H URCH

U.S.N.S.A.

Education Travel Inc.
WORK, STUDY, TRAVEL
ABROAD'

campus travel board*

SGC room S.A.B.
or Ca ll662-4780

3-5

LE HAVRE - The Mona Lisa
sailed yesterday for the United
States for a brief display. After a
three-week exhibition in the Na-
tional Gallery in Washington, the
Mona Lisa will be returned to her
____home in the Louvre.
"-""""" * * *

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 am. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff : Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with Holy Communion. Sermon by Pastor
Scheips, "ThatmYour Joy May Be Full."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Luthern Stu-
dents, Fellowship Supper.
Sunday ath 7:00:Candlelight Choral Service,
featuring the Chapel choir.
Sunday from 8:00 on: "Open House" in Pastor
and Mrs. Scheips' residence.
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. and at 10:00 p.m.:
Advent Midweek Vespers, with sermon by
the pastor, "John the Baptist: The Voice
of Hope."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Service. The subject will
be: "Wanted: Peace on Earth."
SATURDAY, DEC. 15
The U-M Student Group will meet at 8 p.m. at
1476 Kirtkland.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
John G. Malcin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
THE SALVATION ARMY
Religious services every Sunday
220 E. Washington
Sunday School-10:00 a.m.
Holiness Service-i11:00 a.m.
Evangelistic Service-7:15 p.m.
Everyone is Welcome

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Morning Worship, The
Advent Gospel: "The Good News of God's
Grace," sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM) 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar, "Japanese Buddhism,"
Pine Room.
6:00 p.m.-SUPPER and training session for
S.R.S., Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Christmas Carols, Dance and Play
in praise of the Christ Child.
MONDAY
8-11 p.m.-Open House, M. Jean Robe's
apartment.
TUESDAY
12:00 Noon-Student Cabinet Luncheon, Pine
Room.
WEDNESDAY
7,;00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, follow-
ed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
4:00 p.m.-Coffee Hour, Wesley Lounge.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.

hirf E'

\A 3 rArd

r

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COMING SUNDAY

NEW YORK-A lethargic Stock
Market racked up moderate gains
yesterday. The Dow-Jones 30 in-
dustrials were up 2.90, the 20 rail-
roads down .15, the 15 utilities up
.15 and the 65 stocks up .74.

the all-fun, all-animated show
from U.PA. with conversation

.6

DIAL-6290-

DIAL 5-6290 that could only happen in
ves . . . with the voices o
favorite stars!
the Voice of
JIUDY GARLAND

9

VIC DAMONE
of Beverly Hills, California
Recording Artist
JEANNE FRANKEL
of Stamford, Connecticut
Broadway performer, Baha'i pioneer
and lecturer
DR. HARRISON LANGRALL
of Marion, Indianra
Physician and surgeon
DOUG MARTIN
of Kitchener, Ontario
Historian, author and lecturer
POWELL LINDSEY, Moderator
of Detroit Michian

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Discussion of: "The Truth Shall
Make You Free." Chapter 7 in Conscience
on Campus.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. Worship and Discussion on "This I
Believe."
MONDAY
12 noon-Lunch and Discussion.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
I IITHIERAN STUDFNT CENTER

5~~' * IN AS Aa.LrnJATE ION uco

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Ray and Nancy McNair, House Directors
SUNDAY

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister

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