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December 14, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tram it' ,

THE MICHGAN I)AIV rn tn I

SGC PROPOSALS:
Considers Joint Government

Woman Dental Student
Views Interest in Field

PARKS, CAMP SITES:
Committee Studies Management Needs

"

By RICHARD KELLER SIMON.
Student Government Council
heard a report Wednesday from
the Committee on the University
proposing further study of the es-
tablishment of a joint student-
faculty government.
Council debated the report in a
committee of the whole discus-
sion, criticized parts of it and
passed a motion commending the
committee's work and referring
the proposals back for alteration
and refinement.
The committee report states
that students should not only be
concerned with student activities,
but also with problems of the en-
tire University. Greater student
concern in these areas, the com-
mittee feels, would come about if
students were given greater re-
sponsibility in important Univer-
sity decisions. A student-faculty
government would also provide for
presently lacking informal contact
between the two groups.
Initial Steps
As an initial step the commit-
tee recommended that students be
appointed to eight of the Univer-
sity Senate committees to test the
feasibility of joint government.
In debate, Robert Ross, '63,
pointed out that there are dangers
in establishing a faculty-student
government over student affairs
in addition to University affairs.
Several Council members raised
the question of what would hap-
pen to "student opinion" under the
system, whether it would disappeai
altogether, or become a "general
opinion."
Faculty Opposition
Other problems raised were the
expected opposition of the faculty
to such a government, and wheth-
er the proposals should be divided
to increase the possibility of .ap-
pointing students to faculty com-
mittees without making the fac-

ulty feel it had endorsed the idea
of joint government.
SGC also debated a motion from
Fred Batlle, '63A&D, and Kenneth
Miller, '64, that would change the
status of ex-officios on Council.
The motion would have in-
creased SGC membership from 18
to 22, adding two elected and two
ex-officio members, and would re-
move voting privileges of ex-offi-
cios.
Deletes Specifics
The original declaration and
mandate involving these specific
points was deleted by Conucil,
leaving the principle. This states
that ex-officios should not have
voting privileges, because they are
not democratically elected; do not
necessarily have a wide knowledge
of campus affairs; do not have
enough time to devote to SGC in
addition to their other duties; and
tend to limit the concerns of Coun-
cil to undergraduate extracurricu-
lar activities.
In debate, President Steven
Stockmeyer, '63, disagreed on the
point that the presence of ex-offi-
cios is the factor that limits Coun-
cil's concerns to undergraduate ex-
tracurricular affairs. He maintain-
ed that it is the fault of all 18
members.-
Postpones Action
Ross said that most ex-officios
do have specific knowledge which
elected members do not, but that
this knowledge has no relation to
Council.
In debate, SGC agreed to post-
pone any further action until the
Committee on Student Concerns
reports on the problem in the near
future. ,
In related business, Council de-
feated a motion to remove ex-of-
ficio members from the obligation
to serve on SGC committees.
Council passed a motion from
Howard Abrams, '63, setting forth

the aims and powers of the United
States National Student Associa-
tion Committee, and refused to
take action on a motion from Mi-
chael Kass, '65, endorsing the work
of the Ann Arbor Friends of the
Student Non-Violent Coordinating
Committee.
Public Relations
SGC also amended and passed a
motion from Administrative Vice-
President Charles Barnell, '63, and
Treasurer Russell Epker, '64BAd,
establishing a public relations
committee. It postponed action to
appoint a director of the commit-
tee.
Council voted for the first time
this semester to extend the clos-
ing time of the meeting from the
normal midnight deadline.
In further action, Council also
voted to suspend next week's reg-
ularly scheduled Wednesday night
meeting because of Christmas va-
cation. The next SGC meeting will
therefore be held Jan. 9, 1963.

By STEVEN HALLER
The only woman enrolled in the
dental school, Nathalie Palmer,
'66D, admits that she "used to
hate" dentists.

"I spent so many hours in a
dentist's chair as a young girl
that I vowed never to be a dentist
myself," Miss Palmer says. She ex-
plained that she was interested in
a career in science other than
teaching where she could work
with children; and this aim,
coupled with a visit to a dentist's
office, equipped with all the mod-
ern conveniences, caused her to
decide upon a career in dentistry.
Miss Palmer adds that she was
very surprised when she learned
of the unique position she would
occupy; for in France, where she
spent her childhood, women den-
tists are common, and dentistry is
considered a good profession for
a woman to enter.
Wistful Wish
To the question of how she
feels about being in the dental
school, she responds, "I love it-
but sometimes I wish there were
another girl there I could com-
pare notes with!"
She adds that the boys in her
class often joke about her presencej
"especially the married ones."
This is often the case, for exam-
ple, when cadavers are dissected
and studied. "I guess the boys just
like to see me blush," she says.
Miss Palmer adds that there
were no unusual circumstances
surrounding her enrollment in the
dental school.
Same Tests
"I took the same tests as every-
one else and got the same letter
in the mail, telling me I'd been
accepted."
Miss Palmer points out that she
is not the first woman ever enter-
ing the dental school; in fact, the
first degree awarded by the Uni-
versity was to a woman, she said.
However, she is still the only
woman now enrolled in that
school.

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
The natural resources school has
established a committee to inves-,
tigate problems in outdoor recrea-
tion resources management, Prof.
Lyle E. Craine, chairman of the
conservation department and head
of the committee, said recently.
"Since the war there has been a
terrific increase in the number of
people going to outdoor recreation-

increased demands on research and
teaching programs. The commit-
tee is an outcome of that realiza-
tion," Prof. Craine added.
"We have consulted with facul-
ty and experts outside the faculty
in an attempt to understand the
boom in outdoor recreation and
especially in resource use."
The two main fields of study of
the committee will be training per-
sonnel to handle efficiently the
demands on existing recreational
resources and regional planning of
outdoor parks and forests.
Recreational Personnel
"In the field of recreational per-
sonnel, we will consider the areas
of research which are open and
any teaching needs which are not
being served. We have already add-'
ed a few courses to the curricu-
lum in the forestry department.
"One of the problems is that no
one knows exactly what outdoor
recreation is," Prof. Craine re-
marked.
"The actual locations concerning
the committee will be those where
the recreational value is found in
the site itself. In these areas the
problem is accommodating large
hordes of people without letting
them damage the sites they came
to enjoy."
"In the future there must be
someone specially trained for out-
door recreation management. At
present the personnel who are
managing recreational areas are
usually foresters or persons train-
ed in physical education," he con-
tinued.
Curriculum Additions
"The committee will discuss a
curriculum leading to a special de-
gree in outdoor recreation man-
agement."
In the areas of regional plan-
ning, the committee will investi-
gate the use of land for recrea-

NATHALIE PALMER
... dental career

LANGUAGE ANALYSIS:
Pike Explains Methods
In 'Tagmemics' Teaching

tion. "Regional planning of parks.
forests and camping sites must be
coordinated with the regional
planning of all land and water re-
sources."
Foruinstance, the building of a
reservoir for water supply may pro-
vide the opportunity to build a
beach for swimming.
Limited Budget
The committee will also con-
sider the question of which rec-
reational areas should get what
percentage of a limited budget.
Between now and the year 2000,
the population will have tripled.
But the demand for recreation has
been predicted to triple, he point-
ed out. Since this demand will
come mostly from the cities, re-
gional planning must concern it-
self with setting aside suitable
areas.
"The committee will try to get
a better idea of what the needs
are in outdoor recreation resource
management. Also, it will decide
what parts of the problem the nat-
ural resources school can best
make contributions to," Prof.
Craine concluded.
To Give Program:
Of Indian Dances.
The India Students Associa-
tion will present a program of
classical and folk dances of In-
dia at 7:30 p.m. today at the First
Baptist Church. Tickets are avail-
able at the International Center.
Proceeds will be contributed to the
India Defense Fund.
J II 1 wrnnif i'aUlm
STARTING
SUNDAY
Some men love war
the way others
love women.,j ,

Jay Discusses Flouridation
Of Ann Arbor Water Supply
06

By GAIL BLUMBERG
"Flouride supplements are a
waste in areas whose water con-
tains flourine," Prof. Philip Jay
of the dentistry school, said at the
pharmacy seminar held in Ann
Arbor recently. Prof. Jay re-
proached Ann Arbor pharmacists
for selling vitamins with ,added
fiouride supplements because Ann
Arbor has flouridated water. If a
water system has flourides, any
vitamin supplement, fluoride pill
or flouride toothpaste will be an
excess and "waste of money, he
said.
The human body only needs a
certain amount of flourine, he
said. Any excess, while it does no
harm, is unneeded and is finally
discarded. This was shown, Prof.
Jay said, by a survey which com-
piled occurence of dental decay in
major cities in relation to the
flourine content of their water.
As the flourine content increased
from zero to 1 part of flourine in
one million parts of water a bene-
ficial action was seen. But no mat-
ter how high the flourine content
increased above one part in one
million the decay level remained
the same.
Beneficial Effect
"Flourides have a definite bene-
ficial action on the teeth but only
when used at the right time,"
Prof. Jay noted. Flourides are ab-
sorbed through the intestines into
the system and growing teeth use
fluorine to strengthen their
enamel growth. Thus, flouridated
'vater is most effective up until
twelve years of age.
Swithinbank Sets
Antarctica Speech
Charles Swithinbank, acting
head of the glacial geology and
polar research laboratory of the
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy, will speak on "A New Age in
Antarctica" at 4:10 p.m. today in
Rm. 138, Classroom Bldg., of the
Dearborn Center.

Because purification and water
softeners do not destroy the
flouride content of water and be-
cause of its safety and relative low
cost, most major cities have flour-
idated their water, Prof. Jay as-
serted.
Flouride Treatment
Prior to the water flouridation
an external flouride treatment was
in wide use. High concentrations
of flourine -are applied to the out-
side of the teeth to strengthen the
enamel. If enough flourine ad-
heres, some benefit is derived. This
method is inferior to internal ab-
sorption, he added.
"The use of flourides has low-
ered the decay rate in Ann Arbor
and freed dentists of a good part
of their routine work," Prof. Jay
concluded.

By JOAN EVANICH
At a meeting of the Language
Learning Research Club Wednes-
day, Prof. Kenneth Pike of the
English department explained his
"theory of tagmemics," a new ap-
proach to the analysis of language.
"This theory would apply the
principles of linguistics to the
teaching of English composition,
something which is not being done
in the average classroom, but
which is being experimentally test-
ed," Prof. Pike pointed out.
Tagmemic principles outline
methods of verbal expression
through contrast, whereby some-
thing may be defined by describ-
ing qualities which it does not
have; range of variability, a meth-
od of definition which relates
something to opposite extremes;
and class, which determines the
range of variability.
Form and Meaning
Prof. Pike went on to explain
the tagmemic principle of form
and meaning in which two objects
or ideas may have the same struc-
Walterhouse Bids
For Re-Election
Republican Fourth Ward Coun-
cilman Richard G. Walterhouse
has announced he will seek re-
election for a second two-year
term. No other Fourth Ward con-
tenders have yet announced their
candidacies.

ture, but which may be proceed-
ing from different causes or going
to different ends. Related to this
is the concept that language can
be viewed as particles, wave, and
field. A particle is the unit per-
ceived as a separate entity, while
the same unit viewed as a wave is
seen as a physical entity fusing
into its environment. When viewed
as a member of a field, this unit,
however, would be understood as
a point in a network of intercept-
ing relationships, he continued.
"Language," Prof. Pike went on
to explain, "is symbolic behavior.
No two people view the same ob-
ject in the same way and hence
understanding is arrived at only
through sharing some components
of experience."
Practical Implications
In citing the practical implica-
tions of this hypothesis, Prof. Pike
pointed out that a brief experiment
testing the principles of tagmem-
ic theory has been put into effect
at the University. The English de-
partment, under the direction of
Prof. Hugh English, hasecreated
a pilot program using a few of
these principles to teach composi-
tion to freshman students Due to
the recent incorporation of the
program, no conclusions about its
effectiveness have yet been reach-
ed.
Prof. Pike added that his study
of linguistic science as related to
teaching English composition is
supplementing a number of more
extensive programs under devel-
opment at the University.

inst
and
port
of
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1972
T
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but
long
Ex
ages

By BARBARCA PASH
The federal government should
itute a more liberal, flexible
coordinated system of trans-
tation," Prof. Donald Cowan
the business administration,
ool, said recently.
he government now has com-
e control over the rates
rged by railroads and inter-
e trucking, but the present
tem should be more responsive
changes in rates, he explained.
he government is presently en-
ed in construction of a vast in-
state highway network, which
scheduled for completion by
Impact on Railroads
his stress on highways and the
wth of the airlines is detrimen-
to the railroads, which area now
ountering tremendous difficul-
. But it has yet to be proven
t truck transport will, general-
prove to be more economical
,n railroads, Prof. Cowan con-
ned.
The highways are excellent for
ium and short-length hauls,
the railroads are better for
distances," he noted.
xtensive fraud and misman-
ment uncovered by state and
ral investigators have ham-
d the highway system's devel-
ent and aroused public opin-
already antagonized by the
increases related to the $41

billion state and federal funds
required, Cowan stated.
"The main difficulties which the.
states have to meet are lack of
adequate, trained administrators
and highway officials and the bur-
den of paying their share of con-
struction," he explained. One of
the chief problems is the inexper-
ience of the states in the tech-
nique of acquiring land for the
highways.
The nation's total interstate
highway spending is on target
only because a few states have,
forged ahead, often spending their
own money and receiving federal
To Interpret
Mathematics
Professors William J. LeVeque
and Donald J. Lewis of the mathe-
matics department will head a
two-day conference on "The
Theory of Numbers" today and
tomorrow at the University.
Principal speakers will include
visiting Prof. Harold Davenport of
the mathematics department at
3:30 tomorrow, Prof. Peter Ro-
quette of the University of Notre
Dame at 4:00 today, and Prof.
Stanislaw Knopowski of Tulane
University at 11:00 tomorrow, all
in Rm. 3201, Angell'Hall.

RELIGIOUS MATTERS:
ORA Offers Students Counseling

Cowan Views Transportation Needs

PROF. LYLE E. CRAINE
... outdoor recreation
al areas," Prof. Craine explained.
"As a result, personnel handling
the parks are overwhelmed by the
load.
"The problem finally received
public recognition in 1958 when
Congress established the Outdoor
Recreation Resources Review Com-
mission, which made its report a
year ago," he noted.
Study Increased Demands
"The natural resources school
realizes it must take a look at the

reimbursement later. As of Sep-
tember, New York had completed
51 per cent; Connecticut, 55 per
cent; Ohio, 43 per cent. However,
Montana had finished only 13
per cent; West Virginia, 23 per
cent; and Indiana, 27 per cent.
Economic Effect
Prof. Cowan noted that there is
some question concerning the
economic utility of the new sys-
tem. Although highway construc-
tion has been a stimulating factor
on the economy, the roads will be
in direct competition with the al-
ready-established railroad system.
"The government is interested
in building through-systems more
than local systems. Therefore,
some of the states may question
spending money"for roads fromn
which they will gain - less than
their share of the expenditure in-
volved," he said.
DIAL 5-6290
4 Shows Daily at
1:10-3:40-6:10-8:40
Feature Times below
"A fine film which I recommend
without reservation"
Steven Hendel
-Michigan Daily
Frank
Sinatra
Laurence
Leigh1
Marcian
Candidate

By LOUISE LIND
"A problem becomes religious in
nature when the solution to it is
dependent upon an understanding
of the fundamental purposes of
life," DeWitt C. Baldwin, coordi-
nator of religious affairs and
chairman of the Board of Religious
Counselors explains.
"Although religious counseling is
only one of various areas of coun-
seling at the University, it is a
most important area. While it is
true that many college students
do not desire such counseling,
many others do who suffer prob-
lems of a religious nature."
In 1947, hoping to relate coun-
seling by community chaplains,
ministers and other religious work-
ers to its own counseling services,
the University established the
Board of Religious Counselors,
Baldwin explains.
Coordinates Religious Counseling
The board, which includes rep-
resentatives from 23 religious de-
nominations and the Office of

Religious Affairs, thus provides an
opportunity for the University, a
state-supported institution, to rec-
ognize officially directors of stu-
dent programs and other religious
workers for their counseling serv-
ices. More important, -the board
works to coordinate religious coun-
seling across the campus.
Important Work
The importance of the work of
the ORA is evidenced by a study
made of all phases of counseling
given by the University in 1957.
In that academic year, 15 per cent
of the counseling given male stu-
dents was of a religious nature, as
compared to the 30 per cent of-
fered on academic matters. Of the
counseling offered to female stu-
dents, 21 per cent related to reli-
gious matters, while 27 per cent
concerned the academic.
Last year the staff of the ORA
counseled 280 students.
"The problems students ap-
proach us with are of five varie-
ties," Baldwin relates. "They con-
cern any personal difficulty in-
volving a philosophy of life, intel-
lectual problems of religion that
may have come about as a result
of discussions of a religious nature
held in the classroom, interracial
and interfaith marriages, guilt
complexes or any personal situa-
tion."
"In the counseling of all such
problems, it is our philosophy to
use an indirect rather than a di-
rect method--not to advise, but
to draw out of the student as much
of the solution as we can," he
continued.
"Needless to say, all our counsel-

ing is kept confidential. The only fede
difficulty occurs when students pere
hesitate to state the real prob- opm
lem through guilt or lack of con- ion,
fidence " tax
The ORA is presently involved
in a move to integrate all Univer-
sity -counseling in a better way. I
"Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs James A. Lewis is the force 7
behind this movement whose goal
is to, develop a relationship of re-
ferral back and forth between our
office and the Bureau of School
Services, Health Service, the aca-
demic advisors and other branches
of University counseling," Baldwin
relates.
"However, the most immediate
problem confronting the ORA is
how to provide adequate religious
service on the rapidly developing
North Campus," he continued.
"Plans to extend our services to
that campus have been initiated."
Holiday Gathering
Set at Dearborn
The University Faculty Wo-
men's Club of Dearborn will hold
a holiday tea from 3-5 p.m. today
in the multi-purpose room of the
Student Activities Bldg. of the,
Dearborn Center.

f t
COLUMBIA MiCTURES presets
STEVE ROBERT
McQUEEN'WAGNER

DOORS
OPEN
12:45
DAILY

* ENDS SATURDAY *
Shows at 1:10-3:05
DIAL 5:00-7:00 and 9:05
rz D zU~2.6264 Feature Starts
10 MinutestLater
:. AT LAST!A MOTION PICTURE THAT DELIVERS...1
W ARVON EL SA
a.. CMR L
ESTO

SHIRLEY
ANNE IIL

An
-ARTHUR HaRN .W
Producfion

I '- o"r

.- U

DIAL 8-6416

Ends
Saturday

- MELVILLE SHAVELSONSvowma
Ts gon af
came to make
threw in the oow lARRY GABRIEIA BRIAN
oweW ffl IN9 BC6 I I "PAL1 NIBll1R
* SUNDAY *
STEVE McQUEEN ® ROBERT WAGNER
n
""T HE WA R LOVE R"

Because it
is so'vital
that you see
it from the
beginning,
check these
starting times
very carefully!
Feature
goes
on at:
1:30 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
6:30 P.M.
9:00 P.M.

PICTURES
RL eR LA l Mo n
ROGER VADIM'S UNCUT

CHRISTMAS PARTY
Saturday, Dec. 15, 1962
at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER
8:00 p.m.-1 :00 a.m.
arranged by
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Members: Free and Non-Members: 50c
BRING A MODEST GIFT-25c

MASTERPIECE!

i

I

ii

s. G. Co Cihena quiki
*
TONIGHT at 7:00 & 9:00 Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 & 9:00
ORSON WELLES' Tolstoy's
JOURNEY INTO FEAR ANNA ARFlhINA

The Michigan Union Cultural Affairs Comnittee Presents
JAZZ ON CAMPUS
featuringi

I

THE WHOLE WORLD IS
i a VA I pa WI , m 11rmlr

I

II

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