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December 13, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TRTT'R..gn A V . 'n'P !l"i!MRVV It '

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PRESSURES:
Discuss Freedom Limitations

By JAMES NICHOLS
The stresses placed on society
by, the modern world are being
translated into freedom-destroy-
ing pressures on the public univer-
sity, Prof. Richard L. Cutler of
the psychology department said
yeserday.
American society today is "clus-
tered together under a large um-
brella" seeking protection from
these stresses. Its reaction to the
pressures acting upon it seems to
be a fearful clinging to the stat-
s '
yr t
....................

which plague society today, he ex-
plained.
Historically, there are two reac-
tions to such stress - "fight or
flee." "We have chosen a kind of
fusion," Prof. Cutler said. "We
move not to move; we act not
to have to act."
At this point, he said, the
stresses on society are translated
into societal pressures on public
universities.
"It is but a short step from 'we
should not do anything different
or dangerous' to 'we should not
think anything different or dan-
gerous'," Prof. Cutler noted.
If society fears controversy, and
if its goal is conformity, then be-
liefs or ideas which deviate from
"dead center" are seen as "cor-
poral threats, to be dealt with ac-
cordingly," he said. "The witch-
huntings and book - burnings"
which are now going on can easily
become "full-scale purges," he add-
ed.
Points to Shapiro
Prof. Cutler pointed to the case
of Prof. Samuel Shapiro, who took
"an unpopular position" opposing
American action in the recent
Cuban crisis,.
Prof. Shapiro "was a boat-rock-
er, an umbrella tipper," Prof. Cut-
ler said. "His views did not find
favor with the masses, and he lost
his job."
If the universities bow to this
drive toward conformity, then con-
troversy, the confrontation of op-
posing views, and experimentation
in the social sciences will be
stifled, Prof. Cutler said. If schools
share society's fear of debate, con-
flict will be resolved "at the lowest
possible level"-not in free and
open contest, but through "behind
the scenes maneuvers."
Wales To Speak
On South Africa
Prof. Hugh G. Wales of the Uni-
versity of Illinois will speak on
"An Analysis of Marketing Activi-
ties in South Africa" at 7:30 p.m.
today in Rm. 131 of the school of
b u si n e s s administration. The
speech is sponsored by the Market-
ing Club.

society under stress
RICHARD L. CUTLER

us quo, and a strong aversion to
change. People feel that "things
are all right now, and if we move
too much, things might not be all
right," Prof. Cutler explained.
"When you don't move, nothing
happens to you."
. These stresses result from fears
of nuclear war, threats to Ameri-
can ideology and material super-
iority, social friction stemming
from complex technology, attacks
on. "age-old beliefs and faiths and
styles of operations," and contra-
dictions between the realities of
common practice and the ideals of
Judaeo - Christian religion and
philosophy, Prof. Cutler said.
Hidden Pressures
All of these threats, pressures
and contradictions contribute to
the stresses, obvious or hidden,

Prof. Cutler urged that public
institutions proclaim and defend
"four freedoms for the University"
-freedom for inquiry, for open
debate, for experimentation, and
for expression.
Universities today are "sorely
tempted" to compromise these tra-
ditional freedoms, he said.
Universities may interfere with
these freedoms in order "to im-
prove their public image sufficient-
ly so the state legislature will look
more benignly on them," Prof.
Cutler said.
These freedoms must be defend-
ed "even at the price of sacrifice,"
he said. If we feel that academic
integrity is not a valid concept,
he said, "we may as well go back
and lie in our swimming pools and
wait for the Bomb."
Experiments
On Interaction
Within Family
By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
Family interactions can often
be predicted by examining the
ways in which a family would re-
solve a given problem, Prof. Fred
L. Strodtbeck, director of the Uni-
versity of Chicago social-psychol-
ogy program, said yesterday.
Speaking at the social work-so-
cial science colloquium he explain-
ed that just as gossip often re-
veals group values so does family
discussion of a problem reveal the
ways in which family values are
implemented into policy and also
illustrates the attachment and re-
spect the children hold for their
parents.
He cited one of his experiments
in which various families with one
child were confronted with the dif-
ferent responses each member had
made to a previous questionnaire.
The reactions, in the form of a
family discussion, were secretly
taped. Prof. Strodtbeck said that
this experiment revealed (among
other things) that the spouse who
talks the most also carries the most
influence within the family.
An experiment conducted among
Italian and Jewish families of var-
ious economic levels revealed that
the upper class fathers tended to
have the most influence over their
children because of their success
outside the home, he said.
The two groups were chosen
because of the difference in the
time it takes their immigrant
members to advance up the eco-
nomic scale. The parents chosen
were all third-generation Ameri-
cans and their children fourth-
generation ones, he said.
He said that another experiment
revealed that the boys and girls
with high IQ's displayed the great-
est warmth to their parent of the
opposite sex and made almost no
reaction to the parent of the same
sex.
This same experiment showed
that children with average IQ's
tended to respond more toward
the parent of the same sex, he said.

To Resume
Publication
of Clamor
By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER
The Publications Board of the
College Clamor decided last Thurs-
day to resume publication of the
paper.
The decision came with the
Board's acceptance of Dean Lewis
Fibel's policy of allowing the pub-
lication of the Clamor on an in-
terim basis until it goes to court
December 31, William Readhed,
the Clamor faculty advisor, said
Tuesday.
The Administration, backed by
the Flint Board of Education, had
been attempting to get the Clamor
published either by the current
staff or other students, when the
Publications Board learned that
publication of the paper before
the trial would not hurt the Clam-
or's court case.
Resume Publication
The Student Government had
passed a resolution November 15
urging that the paper resume pub-
lications immediately.
There has been "a widening of
the gap between Student Govern-
ment and the Clamor," Readhed
said. Student Government "has
lost track of the point involved-
freedom of expression," he noted.
The resolution was passed by a
ten to one majority; five of the
Student Government members
were absent at the meeting.
Gene Dennis, Student Govern-
ment president, explained that the
action was prompted by the need
for a campus news media and by
the fact that "many of the stu-
dents had expressed a desire to
have the paper resume publish-
ing. "
Opinion Poll
Dennis further noted that the
student opinion poll concerning
the Clamor had not been com-
pleted successfully..
The campus, with the exception
of a few groups, has been apathet-
ic and has showed little interest in
the situation once the suspension
had been lifted.
Dennis added that the Student
Government felt a definite need
for a policy, but that such a policy
should be the joint product of
students, faculty, and administra-
tion.
Such a policy was written last
spring after an incident involving
the censorship of administrators,
but the policy had been tabled by
the Board of Education due to
changes in the structure of the
Flint Board of Education and the
Administration.
The policy was subsequently lost
and never looked into until after
the November suspension of Dean
Fibel.
To Give Lecture
On Automation
Prof. Noma Chomsky of the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology will lecture on "Intercon-
nections Between the Theory of
Grammar and the Theory of Au-
tomata" at 4:15 p.m. today in
Rackham Amp.

By MARTHA MacNEAL
"Operation Telrad provides stu-
dents in broadcasting classes with
creative latitude beyond that of
ordinary classroom procedure," ac-
cording to Prof. Henry R. Austin
of the speech department.
Telrad is a series of closed-cir-
cuit television and radio programs
written, produced and directed en-
tirely by students, with one pro-
fessional engineer on hand for
technical supervision.
Station WSDM consists of two
radio studios, one television studio,
and several viewing rooms, all lo-
cated in the Frieze Bldg.
Operation Telrad was begun in
Hits Apathy
In Students
Students today have a choice
between perpetuating the "mess"~
things are in or of proceeding to
change them, Prof. Paul A. Schilpp,
of the Northwestern University
philosophy department said yes-
terday.
"Revolution is one of the fore-
most needs of our country" Prof.
Schilpp said. "I am for revolutions
in men's minds," here, or on any
campus, he continued.
The present governments in
Turkey and South Korea are the
results of student revolutions, he
noted. There are places where stu-
dents not only pour over their
books, but take time to inform and
commit themselves; this is not
as easy as it may seem, Schilpp
added.
Apathy Prevails
"Can you imagine students of
the United States throwing over
their govefnment? I cannot," Prof.
Schilpp commented.
It is nearly impossible to incite
women to eliminate sex discrimi-
nation in colleges, he continued.
Hours for women are an example
of discrimination with no scientific
basis. Science has shown women to
be more mature than men of the
same age, so that if anything it
should be the men who have
hours imposed on them.
But still the women of American
colleges and universities will do
nothing.
We must begin to inform our-
selves that not everything on paper
or in books is true, Prof. Schilpp
said.
"The trouble is that all of us
know too many things that aren't
so," he noted. "And no philosophy
of life can be built on misinforma-
tion."
Sane and Real
It is necesary to permeate use-
able knowledge with sane and real
understanding, the two things do
not necessarily follow each other,
Prof. Schilpp continued.
Today, however, men's minds
are closed. It becomes a waste of
time to talk to adults and even
the students merely emote rather
than think. People close their
minds too early, he said.
The older generation of today
has made a mess of things, he
explained, the alumni of universi-
ties today are millstones around
the necks of their schools, he add-
ed.
The need today is for a personal
life of moral dedication, backed up
by devotion, commitment, daring
and audacity.
We must cooperate with one
another to gain anything in this
age when there is danger of the
monstrous weapons of war taking
over.

1947 by Prof. Garnet Garrison of
the speech department, director of
broadcasting. Since that time, the
class has been concentrating on
preparation for this broadcast se-
ries.
Each program is about five or 10
minutes in length. The produc-
tions range from documentaries
such as "Festival of Lights," a
history of the Jewish holy days,
and "Young Russia Speaks" to sea-
sonal programs such as "The Shoe-
maker and the Elves," a puppet
show, and "Please, Santa," taped
interviews with children.
Other programs include musi-
cals, "The Best of Broadway,"
journalistic opinion, drama, "A
Taste of Honey" and a discussion
of "Campus Issues."
Hidden Talent
This kind of work "gives the
students the effect of the imme-
diacy of their programs. Some-
times scriptwriting brings out un-
expected qualities," Prof. Austin
commented.
Studio time is assigned to dif-
ferent classes, and the students
submit and consider their own
ideas. About two weeks of work
is involved in each program, in-
cluding a week of scheduled re-
hearsals. Everyone in the class par-
ticipates, and usually each student
has several jobs.
Talent is often enlisted from
outside the speech department,
among music students and theatre
artists. Some student-written plays
have been produced.
Broadcasting students often
work on local professional televi-
sion stations. They find experience
in broadcasting useful in many ca-
reers, ranging from the arts to
education and business adminis-
tration, Prof. Austin said,
City Acquires
HiuronRiver
Pond System
By JOHN BRYANT
As part of its program to develop
recreation facilities within the city,
Ann Arbor is purchasing four
Huron River ponds.
They extend from a point two
miles upstream from the city to
within a mile of Ypsilanti. In ad-
dition to providing recreational
areas, the acquisition of the ponds
will safeguard the city's water sup-
ply.
Although originally created for
hydroelectric purposes in the early
1900's, the generating apparatus
in the pond dams is being re-
moved.
City Planner Robert Leary said
that a good deal of the land will
probably be left as it is instead of
being converted into a formal park
area.
He feels that the lack of empty
fields in the area is a handicap to
children who want to make their
own amusement and that leaving
the pond areas undeveloped will
help satisfy that need.
The city is also developing Gal-
lup Lake Park on the south shore
of the river east of the city. Ac-
cording to City Architect Pete
Klose, the land will be used most-
ly as a natural area.
Also being developed are Buhr
Park, on Packard Road in the
southeastern part of the city, and
a park near Twin Sister Lake in
the western area. The former will
be a planned recreation area while
the latter will be primarily a nat-
ural park.

BEYOND CLASSROOM:
Operation Telrad Helps
BroadcastingStudents

ITHACA-The Lambda Chi Al-
pha fraternity chapter at Cornell
University has gained local auto-
nomy in membership selection.
The Lambda Chi national will
have nothing to do with member-
ship selection by the Cornell local,
now that a reference to "princi-
ples of Christianity" in the na-
tional fraternity's constitution has
been dropped.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE - Massachusetts
Institute of Technology's Activities
Council has established a special
category for "politically orientated
clubs."
Clubs such as the Civil Rights
Committee and the Young Repub-
licans can neither hold permanent
representation on the Council nor
receive aid as a result of the ruling.
* * *
FLUSHING - Recommenda-
tions that the Speaker Review
Board of Queens College should be
changed have come from the Col-
lege Faculty Committee on Stu-
dent Activities and Services.
The speaker review panel, which
approved NAACP's invitation to
Malcolm X, Black Muslim Leader,
has also come under Senate ex-
amination. A student group has
planned to propose that an open
speaker policy be adopted. Mr. X
is scheduled to debate civil rights
moderate Baynard Rustin.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE-An organization
is being formed at Harvard Uni-
versity to recruit students for pro-
jects aimed at combatting racial
discrimination in the Boston area.
The new group called the Civil
Rights Coordination Committee,
will put interested students in con-
DIAL 5-6290
4 Shows Daily at
1:10-3:40-6:10-8:40
Feature Times below

rmmmummmw-

--

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Presents
"A HANUKA IN ISRAEL
Featuring

College Roundup

tact with agencies dealing with
discrimination in housing and em-
ployment. It will also provide stu-
dents with the opportunity to join
tutorial, recreational and com-
munity involvement programs in
the Negro districts of Boston.
MADISON -- The recommenda-
tion of the University of Wiscon-
sin's Human Rights Committee
that Delta Gamma be allowed to
remain on campus has been en-
dorsed by the Student Life and
Interests Committee at the uni-
versity.
The report "tentatively accepts"
recent declarations by the DG
national that each local chapter.
is free to pledge and initiate
"without regard to race, color,
creed, or national origin.'' The
committee will continue to observe
the policies and practices of DG
in respect to human rights.
Presthus To View
Power Structure
Robert V. Presthus, editor of the
Administrative Science Quarterly,
will give a lecture on "Community
Power Structure" at 8:00 O.m. tq
day in the West Conference RomA
of the Rackham Bldg. The lecture
is sponsored by the Institute of
Public Administration.

DIAL 8-6416
Ends
Saturday
N;
ASTOR
PICTURES
presents 4$
ROGER VADIM'S UNCUT
MASTERPIECE!
THE WHOLE WORLD IS
TALKING ABOUT ITI
NOT RECOMMENDEO FOR THE WMAURt
ASTOR PICTURES Presents
I[AN M[ [OR[adGERAROPHIIPt.
" IAISONS DANGERFIS[1
ROiCFR VADIM 'CHLIDROS DECt
vti aUNvA MAIBCE H~OCINOR PROOUCJIORt
COMING SUNDAY
"EUROPEAN
NITES"

1.
2.
3.
4.

The NAGILA DANCERS of HILLEL
A Hanuka Sing
A Special DRAMATIC PRESENTATION
LATKES

SUNDAY, DECEMBER
All are Welcome

16, at 3 P.M.
1429 Hill St.

'STRATIFICATION':
P s Discusses Research
Of Local Political Activities

4-

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
P RESE NT S
Thursday and Friday at 7:00 & 9:00
ORSON WELLES'
J URNEY INTO FEAR
Orson Welles, Joseph Cotton,
Delores del Rio.
Based on the Eric Ambler spy thriller.
SHORT: Doris Humphrey's Lament for-a Bullfighter,
after the Garcia Lorca poem, with Jose Limon.
Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 & 9:00
Tolstoy's
fANNA KARENINA
Greta Garbo, Frederic March,
Maureen O'Sullivan.
ACADEMY AWARD.
SHORT: Lafcadio

By BARBARA LAZARUS
"At about 1953 many university
professors stopped thinking as
much as before about national pol-
itics and rediscovered the local
scene," Prof. Nelson Polsby of
Wesleyan University at Middle-
town, Conn., said yesterday.
Speaking on the "Problem of
Community Power" at a political
science colloquium, Prof. Polsby
said that there has been a reor-
ientation of political scientist's
thinking. The political scientist
used to view local government in
a problem-solving aspect.
Now definitions of the commun-
ity are formed as scholars would
define it, looking at who governs
in the community, where the pow-
er comes from and how all these
aspects square with the democrat-
ic process.
Prof. Polsby said that most re-
searchers in the local community
have based their studies on the
"rudimentary astratification the-
ory of community power."

This stratification theory saysI
that the upper class (defined by,
social and economic criteria) rules
the community and politicians and
formal leaders are subordinate to
them. There is also a single pow-
er elite with multi-purpose issues:
the upper class rules in its own
interest and social conflict exists
between the upper class and those
beneath it, he added.
"However, there are many com-
munity studie, where these propo-
sitions don't agree with the data.
There are also situations whereI
authors recognize a refutation has
occurred, but explain it away with
'post factum' excuses," Prof. Pols-
by added.
Outlining methods for future
studies of community power, he
said that research techniques
which avoid the stratification the-
ory and which study behavior,
rather than estimations of behav-
ior, must be used to evaluate com-
munity power structures.

0
'l ;4

THE NEW LOST CITY RAMBLERS
"The most improbable trio in music" . . . Mich. Daily
Mike Seeger * Julia Cohen * Tracy Schwarz
Singing and playing old-timey and bluegrass songs
This Friday 8:30 P.M. Union Ballroom

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"
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Mr. Ward

Peterson

I ________ I

DOORS
OPEN
12-45
DAILY

-

I

Shows at 1:10-3:05
!DIAL 5:00-7:00 and 9:05
2-6264 Feature Starts
10 Minutes Later
AT LAST! A MOTION PICTURE THAT DELIVERS.
CIRIUUN!*
CHARLTON ELSA

of the
Summer Placement Bureau
will give a talk on
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT

I

*
Off Broadway's
Longest Running Hit Musical !
Will Fly to Ann Arbor

AMELVILLE SHAVELSONSoh-m

I

I

I

E

I

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