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December 04, 1962 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-04

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iHE MICHfIGAN DAILY PAC

3E THREE

Nehru Claims Chinese
'Thinned Out' Troops,
Doesn't See Pull Back

NEED FUNDS:
Thant, U.S. Give UN Warning
UNITED NATIONS (AP)-The United States and United Nations
Secretary-General U Thant sounded similar warnings yesterday that
the UN is headed for financial disaster unless its members put aside
political considerations and find a formula for raising needed funds.
Bolstered by a World Court advisory opinion that peace-keeping
operations constitute valid expenses of the organization, the Assem-
bly's budgetary committee opened hearings on the problem. It was
complicated by the refusal of the Soviet bloc, France and some others
to pay for the Congo and Middle East forces.
Make Appeal
Thant and Philip M. Klutznick, United States delegate, appealed
for the committee and the Assembly to avoid partisan political speeches
and deal with the central ques- .

Himalayan
Scene Called
'Confusing"
Report Indian Troop
Staying at Positions
NEW DELHI ()-Indian Prim
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru sai
yesterday Communist C h i n e s
front line troops in the Himalaya
may have thinned out, but the;
have not pulled back.
He told Parliament the situa
tion is rather confused.
"There are signs of withdrawa
in the rear-in the front position
they might have thinned out, bu
they have not withdrawn," Nehr
said.
Heading North
Chinese and Indian source
have reported Chinese troops we
returning north in the Himalaya
on the eastern sector. An authori.
tative source in Tezpur said Sun.
day they had moved back 20 mile
at some points in partial fulfill
ment of Peking's one-sided cease-
fire and withdrawal proclamatio
of Nov. 21.
Nehru did not go into that
Standard tactics might call foI
some combat units to cover the
abandonment of occupied terri-
tory and form a rear guard for the
march back.
Await Clarification
India awaited further clarifica-
tion from Peking of provisions in
its proclamation calling for with-
drawal of both armies to position
12/2 miles behind the line of ac-
tual control of Nov. 7, 1959. In-
dian government ministers pro-
pose the lines of last Sept. 8 and
say India will fight for every inch
of her soil.
A foreign ministry spokesman
said Indian troops are standing
pat. Among other things they are
reported holding on to the Ladakh
airfield of Chushul in the north-
west, which is among 2,000 square
miles of Ladakh that the Indians
say China allegally claims as be-
hind its 195 "line of control."
Chinese Masquerade
A military source said there is
apprehension here that the Chi-
nese, who dressed some combat
teams as peaceful Mompa tribes-
men to surprise Indian troops, may
leave some soldiers behind to carry
on as propagandists if not as war-
riors.
In the diplomatic maneuvering,
an Indian mission flew to Colom-
bo, Ceylon, where a conference of
neutrals concerned about the In-
dia-China dispute is tentatively
scheduled for Dec. 10.
The mission's work will be di-
rected by Mrs. Lekshmi Menon,
Nehru's Minister of State for for-
eign affairs. She has just com-
pleted a swing across southeast
Asia to explain India's stand. Mrs.
Menon told newsmen in Madras
that, among all the countries she
visited, only Indonesia seemed to
understand the Indian position
clearly.
Kozlov Finds
Chinese 'Joke'
Very Unfunny
ROME (')-Soviet Premier Niki-
ta S. Khrushchev's chief Commu-
nist party lieutenant brought Mos-
cow's ideological war with Peking
to the Italian party congress yes-
terday, raking the Red Chinese for
a "poisonous and dangerous" posi-
tion in world affairs.
While Chinese delegates listened

stolidly, Frol R. Kozlov, ranking
member of the Soviet Communist
Secretariat, by implication blasted
Red China's leaders for attempting
to "joke with thermonuclear fire"
in the Cuban situation.
Red Chinese leaders were ob-
viously angry last month when+
Khrushchev backed down on the
issue of missile bases in Cuba.

JAWAHARLAL NEHRU
. . : "thining out"
LOCKHEED:.
Ask Court
injunction
LOS ANGELES QP)-The De-
partment of Justice asked federal
court yesterday for an injunction
against Lockheed Aircraft Corp.
and the International Association
of Machinists to prevent further
strike action for 80 days.
The action followed " a request
made earlier yesterday by Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy to Atty.
Gen. Robert Kennedy to seek the
injunction under the Taft-Hartley
Law.
The machinists union halted a
two-day strike against Lockheed
last Thursday as a result of Ken-
nedy's invoking of Taft-Hartley
procedure the day before.

Sandy Sees
Settlement
On Kashmir
Nehru Sets No Limit
On Negotiators, Talks
LONDON (')--Duncan Sandys,
British Commonwealth relations
secretary, voiced high hope yester-
day of a Kashmir settlement in
projected talks between India and
Pakistan.
"I genuinely believe the prospect
of success is greater on this occa-
sion than on any previous occa-
sion," Sandys told the House of
Commons.
Sandys headed a British mission
which checked last week on In-
dia's long-term need for weapons
to meet Red China's threat to the
subcontinent and sought to still
fears in neighboring Pakistan
about the flow of Western arms
to India.
Comparable and coordinated
work was carried out for the Unit-
ed States by a similar mission un-
der Assistant Secretary of State
W. Averell Harriman.
Both consulted at length with
Indian Prime Minister Nehru and
Pakistani President Mohammed
Ayub Kahn-antagonists in a 15-
year quarrel that splits the border
state of' Kashmir on a United
States-supervised cease-fire line.
India and Pakistan share mem-
bership in the Commonwealth.
Nehru told his Parliament in
New Delhi yesterday there will be
no restrictions or preconditions on
the talks and representatives of
both sides will have complete free-
dom to express their opinions.

tion of keeping the UN financially
sound.
Soviet delegate Pavel M. Tcher-
nyshev quickly threw cold \vater
on the proposals.
Rejects Responsibility
He said the Soviet Union still
rejects the responsibility for mem-
bers to Pay Congo and Middle
East costs because they were ap-
proved not by the Security Coun-
cil-where the Soviet Union has a
veto-but by the General Assem-
bly.
"This has been and continues to
be the position of the Soviet Un-
ion," Tchernyshev said.
"The financial situation tran-
s c e n d s political controversy,"
Thant told the committee.
"We are not approaching this
question of who was right or
wrong in past debates," Klutznick
said. "What we now do must be
guided by only one consideration
-nurturing this institution. We
don't believe it is the intent of
any member to bankrupt the
United Nations. k h
Unfurls Basis
For Allotment
of Patronage
By The Associated Press
LANSING - Gov.-elect George
Romney, in his first news confer-
ence since the state elections, an-
nounced yesterday that party af-
filiation would be a consideration
but not the only factor in his dis-
tribution of patronage.
One of the most important posts
-at least as far as the University
is concerned-is the state control-
ler, who heads budget-planning
and budget-request-cutting opera-
tions.
Romney said there are four men
under consideration for this post,
which was vacated Saturday by
Ira S. Polley, who took over from
Prof. Merritt M. Chambers of the
education school as executive di-
rector of the State Council of Col-
lege Presidents.
The governor-elect also reported
he would apply any surplus-ex-
pected to be about $30 million-
from the operating budget towards
reducing the state's fiscal deficit.

'To Resume
'Congo Lift
LEOPOLDVILLE (MP-The Unit-
ed States Air Force will resume its
airlift to the Congo, including the
ferrying of Indian army vehicles
to secessionist Katanga, a United
Nations spokesman said yesterday.
The spokesman would not elab-
orate. But it was recalled USAF
transport planes played a key role
in supplying the UN during the
fighting between UN and Katan-
gan forces last December.
Robert Gardiner of Ghana, head
of the UN Congo operations, is re-
ported to feel that further fight-
ing with Katangan forces can be
avoided if he can over-awe Ka-
tanga President Moise Tshombe
with the world organization's mili-
tary strength in the Congo.
Gardiner returned from consul-
tations with UN Secretary-General
U Thant in New York along with
Brig. Inderjit Rikhye of India,
Thant's military adviser.
Thant proposes to apply eco-
nomic sanctions, if necessary, to
end Katanga's secession. But he
also is keeping an eye on the mili-
tary situation.
Rikhye will survey the UN's mil-
itary position and discuss "meas-
ures to bring an end to attacks
by Katangan aircraft piloted by
mercenaries in North Katanga," a
UN statement said.
The UN last week charged pilots
from Katanga were carrying out
"murderous'' air strikes in North'
Katanga.
The resumption of the United'
States airlift is at the request of
the United Nations.'
USSR To Wait
On Germany
BERLIN (P)-The Soviet Union
is prepared to wait for "the most
favorable moment" to sign a Ger-
man peace treaty, Communist of-]
ficials were reported yesterday to
have told a public meeting in East
Berlin.I

U THANT
. . . financial crisis
AT liJN:
Denounce
Sky Spies
UNITED NATIONS (A) - The
United States yesterday defended
as consistent with international
law the use of satellites in outer
space for collection of military
information.
It met with an immediate chal-
lenge from the Soviet Union.
The declaration on so-called spy
satellites was made in the United
Nations main political committee
by United States Sen. Albert Gore
(D-Tenn).
He said also that "even although
it is now feasible," the United
States has no intention of placing
weapons of mass destruction into
orbit, unless compelled to do so by
the Soviet Union.
Gore clashed in the committee
with Soviet Ambassador Platon D.
Morozov as debate opened on
measures for promoting peaceful
cooperation in exploration of outer
space.
There were United States-Soviet
differences also on the role of pri-
vate enterprise in a global system
of communications satellites.
In an apparent reference to
United States high altitude nuclear
tests, Morozov said the Soviet Un-
ion opposed "all operations of that
kind" which might hinder peace-
ful exploration of outer space.
Gore said it was United States
policy to take all "reasonable and
practicable" steps including con-
sultation with the world scientific
community to avoid space experi-
ments with harmful effects.

Peace Corp's Emphasis
Turns to Latin America
By MALINDA BERRY
The schedule for next year's Peace Corps training program calls a
shift in the Peace Corps' primary emphasis from Africa to Latin
America.
This increased emphasis on Latin America is now becoming the
policy of the organization. It is expected to be written into the Peace
Corps budget that the Kennedy Administration will submit to Congress
next month.
"The President has encouraged us to emphasize Latin America,"
R. Sarget Shriver, the Peace Corps director, said, the New York
Times reported.
More Volunteers
He said the agency intended to put significantly more volunteers
in Latin America than in any other single geographic area, provided
its program was approved by the Budget Bureau, the President and
Congress.
"A part of the reason for the shift may be a growing realization
that conditions in Latin America aren't good and that progress is
necessary," Prof. Robert C. Leestma, director of the University's
Peace Corps activities said yesterday.
Already Apparent
The shift has already become apparent. The Peace Corps dis-
closed that on Nov. 30 for the first time more corps volunteers were
at work in Latin America than in any other region of the world.
Previously the Far East and Africa were most heavily staffed.
This does not iLdicate a decrease in interest in the Asian coun-
tries, Prof. Leestma continued. Rather it corresponds to the increasr;
enthusiasm with which the Latin American countries received the
volunteers.
Shriver emphasized that "Africa and other areas are not being
shortchanged." Rather that "if everything proceeds according to plan,
we'll have twice as many people in each of these areas by this time
next year as we have now."
Close to Home
"Aside from the factor that Latin America is close to home, the
tremendous ferment down there probably accounts for the activity,"
Prof. Leestma said.
"It appears as though if there is no progress within the next
five to ten years, the negative influences may take over," he said.
The administration must feel that the Peace Corps has a real
role to play in "tapping the unrest" in Latin America, and in helping
the, countries develop in an "orderly and democratic" fashion, Prof.
Leestma continued.
Outgrowth of Cuba
Shriver said he felt the trend to emphasize Latin America was an
outgrowth of the nation's concern over the threat of Cuba in this
hemisphere.
As of last March the Peace Corps was operating in only three
Latin American countries. Now it is in 13-Bolivia, Brazil, British
Honduras, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El
Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Peru, St. Lucia and Venezuela,

U U

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-Arab diplomats lined up behind Saudi Arabia
yesterday in criticizing President John F. Kennedy for hailing Israel
as a country "dedicated to human rights."
TEZPUR-United States Ambassador to India John Kenneth
Galbraith toured forward positions held by the Indian army in
northeast India yesterday and
said he was very encouraged.

OUTSTANDING FALL RELEASES
on RCA VICTOR RED SEAL
LANZA! PRICE!
FIEDLERI RUBINSTEINI

GENEVA-Saudi Arabia's King
Ibn Saud flew to Geneva yesterday
for medical treatment, leaving the
reins of his oil-rich country in the
hands of his brother and premier,
Crown Prince Faisal.
* * *
WASHINGTON-A board of in-
quiry told President John F. Ken-
nedy yesterday there appears to
be virtually no chance of avoiding
a strike of longshoremen from
Maine to the Gulf of Mexico on
Dec. 23.
* * *'
WASHINGTON-A secret, high-
ly confidential meeting of lead-
ing Republicans who want Sen.
Barry Goldwater of Arizona for
president was held in Chicago
Sunday.
LONG BEACH - The aircraft'
carrier Kearsarge collided in a fog
yesterday with the big British pas-
senger liner Oriane, with first re-
ports saying that no one was hurt
but that both ships suffered dam-
age
NEW DELHI - Indian Prime
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru told
Parliament yesterday a man who
assaulted India's top expert on the
border dispute with Communist
China appeared to be mentally un-
balanced.
WASHINGTON - Dr. Edward
Teller, internationally-known nu-
clear scientist, received from Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy yesterday
the Atomic Energy Commission's
Enrico Fermi award for 1962.

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