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December 04, 1962 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-12-04

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1962

INTERNAL STRIFE:
Kuins Pinpoint Asia Ferment

Eckstein Notes Conflict
In Marxism, Economics

STRONGER STATES:
Professors View Future of Federalism

By DANIEL SHAFER
Describing "Asia's Quiet Revolu-
ticn" as a "stupendous event which
h,,s been underplayed for years,"
Mr. and' Mrs. Ferdinand Kuhn
commented yesterday on the in-
te:.nal revolution in Asia in a lec-
ture at Rackham Lecture Hall
sponsored by the journalism de-
partment.
Kuhn and his wife who are both1
former staff writers for the New
York Times, described the revolu-
tion as one which is "taking place
ar.d is most noticeable at the
vi~lage level."
Reporting on the basis of first-
hand observations which he made]
while traveling in Asia with his
wife, Kuhn indicated that there
were three basic goals of this revo-
lu';ion in "the soft underbelly of
Asia" (Southeast and Borderland
arias): 1) political independence.
"as a reality, with each nation
governing its own affairs"; 2) eco-
ncmic progress, or what he said
the Asians term "an opportunity
to catch up with the West"; and,
3) social justice and educational
opportunity, with the idea of giv-
in: the younger generation "a
better opportunity than their par-
ents had."
Press Underplay
"Impatience with the Asians
has been the cause of the Ameri-
can press' tendency to underplay
the 'quiet revolution'," he said.
"We should be aware of the three
major handicaps facing the Asian
peoples in this revolution.
First, the absence of such things
as public security, census facilities,
and, consequently, adequate tax
structures. Secondly, the bad-
neighbor inheritance which most
of these nations have. They all
have poor relations with at least
one of their neighbors. Third, their
lack of education on a mass basis."
Kuhn said that there is a ten-
dency among Americans to view
th a Asians as "retreating from
democracy." This is false, he said,
pointing out that it is rather dif-
ficult to retreat from something
"they have never known."
Signs of Revolt
Mrs. Kuhn explained the signs
of the revolutions which she and
her husband observed while in
Asia. "The revolution is primarily
one of improvements. But not of

By THOMAS DRAPER
The conflicts of Marxian ideol-
ogy with the economic structure of
Communism were discussed yes-
terday by Prof. Alexander Eckstein
of the economics department.
Speaking before a group assem-
bled for the Michigan Council for
the Social Studies Meeting on the
teaching of Communism, Prof.
Eckstein said that "The economic
blueprint of pure communism does
not exist. Marx was primarily con-
cerned with explaining the down-
fall of capitalisia. In many cases
whateverMarxian economic ideol-
ogy existed was so much baggage
that had to be discarded."
The revolt of the proletariat was
supposed to come to the most in-
dustrialized nations, Prof. Eck-
stein said. "Exactly the opposite
has happened. Communism has its
greatest appeal in the underdevel-
oped countries. Communism is at-
tractive, he continued, because it
provides a quick way to industrial-
ization.
Income Equality
"A central goal of socialism, is
equality of income." Prof. Eckstein
noted. "Socialism is supposed to
resolve this shortcoming of capi-
talism." However, the Soviet in-
centive system still relies on a
graduation of income based on
performance.
"Before the revolution any trade
unions had a strong political link
with socialism," Prof. Eckstein
said. "When the Bolsheviks came
to power they had to control the
means of production. Trade unions
were oriented to fighting against
plant managers, but these man-
agers were now employes of the
state."
"Sources of conflict did not dis-
appear after the revolution. In the
end, trade unions were controlled
by the state and became a means
for disciplining workers-certainly,
a violation of the socialist ideal of
the role of trade unionism."
Emphasis on Industry
Prof. Eckstein noted t.at maxi-
mizing the rate of industrial de-
velopment is a characteristic of all
Communist development. "This is
consistent with their goal of clos-
ing the industrial production gap

QUIET REVOLUTION-Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Kuhn,, former
staff members of New York Times, described the "underplayed"
revolution in Asia at a lecture sponsored by the journalism
school yesterday.

between the Western and Com-
munist countries. It is a power
oriented rather than wefare ori-
ented pattern of development.
China and the advocates of
Stalinism raise the standard of
living only to the extent that it
raises the productivity of labor."
He said that this does not apply
without qualification to Yugo-
slavia, Poland or Russia since 1955.
The amount of personal consump-
tion per capita is increasing at the
rate of 61%2 per cent per year.
"People are starting to enjoy some
of the fruits of production.".
Prof. Eckstein said that because
of the basic goal of industrial de-
velopment agriculture has been
used to support heavy industrial
investment. The Soviet in the
past have not been prepared to
allocate resources necessary for
agricultural growth. Therefore,
agriculture has become a major
problem, he concluded.
Wu Explores
Chiniaese Art
'r By DEBORAH BEATTIE
"Art must have subject matter,
style, form and a philosophical
concept which affects the artist's
deep inner being," Prof. Nelson
Wu of Yale University said Thurs-
day in a lecture on Chinese art.
Speaking at the second of a
series of lectures on contemporary
China, sponsored by the Chinese
studies center Wu discussed "Yes-
terday's Experience and Tomor-
row's Painting."
Chinese painting is not a pure,
unchanged tradition. It is going
through a change today which is
a reaction 'against the traditional
framework of painting, he ex-
plained.
Viewer Manipulation
However, Chinese artists never
gave' up developing the tradition
of movement. The Chinese artist
manipulates the viewer.Inorder
to understand the picture the
viewer must move back and forth,
in and out and from corner to
corner.
As the viewer changes his rela-
tionship with the painting, the
traditional Chinese painting chal-
lenges him to improve that rela-
tionship, Prof. Wu said.
Western pictures don't move you
about; rather they force the view-
er to stand in one place to avoid
an oblique image of the work, he

By MICHAEL GRONDIN
The key to the future of federal-
ism lies in the "revitalization and
strengthening of state govern-
ments," Professors Joseph Kallen-
bach and Norman C. Thomas of
the political science department
recently agreed.
Because state governments have
been unresponsive to their needs,
people have turned to the federal
government. States have surrend-
ered much of their authority
through unwillingness or inabil-
ity to handle increasingly large
and complex problems, Prof.
Thomas said.
In our modern industrial socie-
ty, "man is powerless to exert any
influence on vast national forces,"
he continued. "People expect and
demand a positive role for the fed-
eral government."
Frontier Importance
In explaining the changing at-
titudes toward federalism, Prof.
Kallenbach cited the importance
of the western frontier in the 19th
century. It provided an outlet for
those who could not survive or-
ganized society.
Functions and purposes present-
ly served by the federal govern-
ment are a "consequence of the
development of the United States
as a complex industrial society.
The individual must now turn to
the federal government, to proved
social stability to give him a "sense
of self-respect and dignity," Prof.
Thomas said.
The Supreme Court decision in
Baker v. Carr is "loaded with un-
answered questions for the federal
system," Prof. Thomas said, in
citing current changes in the fed-
eral system. If the Court adopts
a "definite and firm stand," the
makeup of state legislatures could
be significantly altered.
More Responsive
A more representative state leg-
islature would be more responsive
to the people and thus an in-
crease in state activity could be
expected, he explained.
On this same point the two men
agreed that revitalization will most

probably come through "coopera-
tive federalism."
Cooperative federalism is the
implementation of federal pro-'
grams by means of channeling
funds through state governments.,
The states provide supplementary
funds, administer the programs
and meet any standard set up by
the federal government.
Degree of Control
The drawback of cooperative
federalism is a basic disagreement
on the degree of control which the
federal government can impose on
the states.
Prof. Kallenbach sees two trends
developing. The first Is "the gravi-
tation of ultimate power to make
policy decisions to the federal gov-
ernment" and second, "closer
working relations between the state
and the federal government on
more and more problems."

U

Tomorrow at 8 P.M.
at the HILLEL FOUNDATION

major improvements such as dams,
hospitals, and superhighways;
these 'monuments' are future
promises of the revolution's suc-
cess. The signs now are such
things as road improvements with-
in villages, the building of schools,
and the improvement of public
and private sanitation facilities."
Emphasizing educational im-
provements, Mrs. Kuhn cited such
universities as Bangkok and Cal-
cutta as "status symbols" and
noted that "the degree from such
a university is the supreme status
symbol" for the younger genera-
tion.
She also pointed out that,
among these younger generation
"intellectuals and educated elite,"
Marxism is a prevalent philosophy.
Hard Headed
Kuhn, commenting on what the
United States can do to aid this
revolution, not for humanitarian
reasons but "in its own; hard-
headed interest," pointed out that
he thought "the emphasis has
been wrongly placed in Asian aid.
The stress has been on vast in-
dustrial improvements, following
the Marshall plan used in Europe,
rather than on farm extension

"The end result will unquestion-
ably be a system in which states
will exist in the territorial sense,
but will be engaged in functions
defined by the national govern-
ment," he explained.
Lessen Differences
Differences among the states
will be lessened and they will in-
creasingly become "administra-
tive conveniences."
Prof. Thomas commented that,
"considering the supremacy clause,
the innumerated powers and the
implied powers of the Constitu-
tion, there is virtually no function
performed by state or local gov-
erment which cannot ultimately
be taken over by the federal gov-
ernment."
He added, however, that it is
unlikely Congress will abandon its
resistance to increased federal
power..4

programs and public health im-
provements." He said he thought
the emphasis should be placed on
"developing the capacities of
people" rather than on the pro-
duction and utilization of machin-
ery and "useless gadgets." He
praised President Kennedy's Peace
Corps Program for realizing this
and placing the emphasis in the
proper places.
Announce New
Pledge Class
Company D of Pershing Rifles
has designated the following men
as fall pledges:
John D. Ambrose, '65; Jefferson H.
Barket, '66E; Michael J. Barker, '66;
Frederick T. Baylass, '65; Bernard J.
Bonn, '66; Roy Church, '66E; Bruce P.
Dancik, '66NR; Eric M. Dewitt, '65E;
Frederick H. Edwards, '66E; Richard S.
Gardner, K64Ph; John B. Kelley, '66E;
C. Robert Kidder, '66E; Richard F.
Krapohl, '66; Edmond P. Minihan, '66;
John J. Munn, '66E; Douglass W. Nick-
erson, '65E; Kristofer R. Oehmke, '66;
David L. Pennoch, '66; Allen W. Rigsby,
'65; Roland G. Robertson, '66; Michael
D. Rohrer, '66; Robert W. Sorgen, '65E;
Robert R. Warzinski, '65E; Hubert Win-
kelbauer, '65, and Charles E. Wolfe, '66.

DR. GERALD F. ELSE,
Prof. of Greek and Latin
and Chairman, Dept. of Classical Studies
speaks on
"Moral Dilemmas in Greek Tragedy"
based on Aeschylus' "Agamemnon" and
"Choephoroe;" Sophocles' "Ph iloctetes;"
Euripides' "Hippolytus"
Lecture No. 5 in HILLELS fall Series of
Wednesdays at 8
on "Moral Values Reflected in Great Literature
Open to All
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation-1429 Hill St.

what! You Still Don't Know
About
SKI WEEKEND
Jan. 27-29

F

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at , 3, 5, 7, 9:05 P.M.
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
GREAT FIRST COMEDYI
All about Young Love,
Modern Marriage, and
a tenderly hilarious
honeymoon!
of
RA~G'ONDAQHUTTN
' EXTRA
"MOTHER WAS A ROOSTER"
Cartoon
COMING
Frank Sinatra'
Janet Leigh
in
"MANCHURIAN
CANDI DATE"

'V

Dial 2-6264

4 SHOWS DAILY AT

Now. !1:20-3:45-6:20 & 8:55
i Feature Starts
10 Minutes Later
"Everyone in the Ann Arbor area wants to find out
whatever happened to baby Jane. Why don't
you? The most talked about picture for 1962"
HONORED as the picture to inaugurate the
HOLLYWOOD PReVIeW ENGAGOMONT
Bette Davis and Joan Crawford

I

across
Cam pus
The final two of a series of five
seminars on "Crystal Field Aspects
of the Spectra, Magnetism, Struc-
ture , and Reaction Kinetics of
Complex Inorganic Molecules" wil
meet on Dec. 4 and Dec. 7.
Prof. D. S. McClure of the
University of Chicago will speak
on "Thermodynamic and Stru-
tural Aspects of Crystals and Li-
gand Field Theories" at 3:00 p.m
Dec. 4 in Rm. 1400 Chem. Bldg.
Prof. R. G. Pearson of North-
western University will speak on
"Kinetic Aspects of Crystal Field
Theory" at 3:00 p.m. Dec. 7 also
in Rm. 1400 Chem. Bldg.
Home Nursing .
The potentialities of home care
nursing will be viewed in the two.
day Michigan Health Council Stat
Conference on "Home Care in
Michigan" today and tomorrow
in the Union.
Dr. Sidney E. Chapin of Dear-
born, chairman of the council',
Home Care Committee will delive
the keynote speech at 10:00 a.m
today.
Voting Drive.. .
The Rev. June Dowdy and Mr
T. L. Red Fearn will speak or
Operation Freedom tonight atf
p.m. in theF3rd Floor Conferenc
Room of the Michigan Union
Operation Freedom is an organ
ization formed in 1959 to protec
those Negroes trying to registe:
for voting in the elections hel
that year.

Name Cartwright
Faculty Advisor
Prof. Donald Cartwright of the
civil engineering department has
been appointed as an additional
faculty advisor to the Engineering
College Council. The appointment
was made last Thursday, effective
immediately.

f
l
a
1
.
e
S
r
n
8
t
r
d

Snow

Valley Ski Club-Gaylord

noted.
Static Art
When Eastern and Western art
forms are combined, the result is
static art. The light falls at an
angle which gives the picture a
single proper perspective.
Prof. Wu explained the ideology
involved in learning the Chinese
art form. Showing the develop-
ment of one stroke into an orchid
leaf, he emphasized that the pro-
gram of the stroke is a micro-
scopic image of an entire picture.
In addition, the artist must the
symbols used for ideological ex-
pressions, such as meeting and
talking, before he is ready to do
a picture.
Lengthy Landscapes
Through a series of slides, Prof.
Wu demonstrated the necessary
procedure for viewing a traditional
long landscape. The length of such
pictures makes it impossible for
the viewer to see them all at once.
"The viewer must always exer-
cise vision, memory and anticipa-
tion," Prof. Wu insisted.
At first the viewer is high in
the air and, not invited into the
picture. The traditional land-
scapes always had an entrance, a
place of importance and an exit.
"Trditional art is temporal art
and must not be treated differ-
ently," he explained.
Album Art
Prof. Wu discussed the narra
tive style of album art, showing
the development of this form in a

Petitioning for
FROSH WEEKEND
central committee

-

1111

INCLUDED:
8 MEALS
2 NIGHTS LODGING
2 FULL DAYS SKI TOWS
*2 HOURS SKI INSTRUCTION
MAJOR REDUCTION IN SKI RENTAL
DANCE WITH A LIVE BAND
* NORMAL USE OF LODGE FACILITIES
*,ROUND TRIP BUS TRANSPORTATION
GROUP INSPIRED, SELF-INITIATED
CO-EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION
(There will be 76 men and 76 women)
All for only $38
Sign-up will be Dec. 17-19 and Jan. 3-4,
Detailed information available at student
offices of League and Union after Dec. 7.
YOU WILL HAVE FUN!!

starts tomorrow
and
continues through Dec. 17.
Pick up petitions
in the League Undergrad.
Office and sign up
for an interview.

CHARLTON HESTON in
"THE PIGEON THAT TOOK ROME"

..

-...

i,

DIAL 8-6416
S ENDS WEDNESDAY
Shows Today at 7 & 9 P.M.
BANNED
IN ITS COUNTRY
OF ORIGIN
"THIS IS
UNQUESTIONABLY
A GREAT PICTURE!
-Post
"A REMARKABLE
PIECE OF MOVIE,
MAKING!"
- Herald Trbun.

Yale Poet . . . series of album pictur
Prof. John Hollander, of Yale traditional blossom then
"Chinese artists show
Univers et, will present a r di nability to carry abstra
. rAbud.o A.i Tetr a d n ip o nsored an extrem e w ithout 1
vA r yAud. A. The reading is sponsored image," he said. For in
by the English department. actual lotus flower or
FrenchAide.photograph is never sup
rn d . painting if one takes th
t-Rene Allewaert, Cultural At- view.
Cache of the French Embassy, will Chinese painting a
Sdeliver a lecture on "Les Francais viewer to come into ti
et La Litterature Americaine" at By excercising his prei
4:10 today in Aud. C. reshape the image,t
brings it closer and inte
YR'sElefeelings of the viewer.
Rs E l ion . *Explaining Communi
I The Young Republicans will hold art, Prof. Wu noted tha
their annual elections of club of- meaning out of pain
ficers tonight at 8 p.m. in Room makes the art a means t
3-S of the Michigan Union. of propagating Commu
New chairman for the four YR "The viewer is no lo
standing committees will also be manipulated, but is bein
appointed at this time. he said.
Only 11 more
N 6*8"shopin days unti

res with a
me.
w a great
act art to
losing the
stance, an
a colored
perior to a
he Chinese
llows the
he picture.
rogative to
the artist
nsifies the
st Chinese
at it takes
nting and
to the end
mist ideals.
nger being
ng shown,"
YYY

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11

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