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November 30, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-30

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T u THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRMD

AY, NOVEMBER 30, 1962

Council Agrees Vote Indication Unclear

Counseling Service Aids
Students' Mental Health

SUMMER SESSION:
Implement Full-Year Shift

grown in membership within the
last four years, he noted that it
is time to gE rid of the "stagna-
tion of the last four years."
Ross replied that USNSA mem-
bership was not stagnant, claiming
that the absence of a number of
Southern schools due to the in-
tegration problem has made the
membership seem static. Ross
charged that reformation at this
time would wipe out the work of
the previous 15 years.
In other action, motions to par-
ticipate in the Foreign Student
Leadership Project of USNSA and
to grant temporary recognition to
a new campus magazine were ap-
proved.
Other Action
The FSLP enables foreign stu-
dents to come to the University
for study at no expense to the
student. Financial arrangements
are to be handled by both SGC
and the USNSA.
The University Fellow Discus-
sion Club was granted temporary
recognition in order to publish
its magazine, "New University
Thought."

t'

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
third in a six part series on coun-
seling at the University.)
By BARBARA LAZARUS
The Department of Mental Hy-
;iene is a part of Health Service
which is designed to help students
with mental, emotional and per-
sonality problems and disturb-
ances of the nervous system.
Dr. Donald Schaefer, director
of the department, said that "the
staff includes psychiatrists, neuro-
logists and mental hygiene coun-
selors who handle varied prob-
lems."
The department is designed to
safeguard the total mental and
emotional health of the student,
and the situations it handles cover
a variety of problems, ranging
from relatively simple to more
acute, he explained.
"The student has freedom to
come on his own if he chooses, or
hie may be recommended to come
by a physician, counselor or other
interested person who feels he
would benefit from the services
that the department renders," Dr.
Schaefer said.

The counseling must be volun-
tary on the part of the student,
even if he is recommended by
someone else, he added.
"The type of counseling depends
cn the individual problem, and it
will continue as long as necessary
in order to clear up whatever prob-
lem is bothering him."
"The Department of Mental Hy-
giene cooperates with other Uni-
versity counseling agencies and
endeavors to avoid any duplica-
tion of function with other stu-
dent counseling agencies such as
those of an academic, social or
religious nature," Dr. Schaefer
said.
Moltz To Discuss
Imprinting Method
Prof. Howard Moltz of Brooklyn
College will speak on "Imprint-
ing: An Epigenetic Approach" at
4:15 p.m. today in 429 MH. The
lecture is one of a series of col-
loquia sponsored by the psychol-
ogy department.

(Continued from Page 1)
Spurr gave two reasons for the
new calendar's implementation.
First, the University is hopeful)
that both students and faculty will
like the new arrangement better
than the old. He noted that it
would eliminate the "lame-duck
session" between the period after
Christmas vacation and the be-
ginning of the new semester.
He noted that the new calendar
is a trial arrangement and that
the University will be willing to
reconsider it if it is not satisfac-
tory to students and faculty.
Second, the new calendar creates
more space for a third semester.
The different colleges can staff
more summer programs once they
have determined the extent of
interest on the part of faculty and
students and the amount of funds
available.
Now, the schools can make dif-
ferent changes in the calendar on
their own provided this does not
interfere with the workings of the
other schools. Several programs

have long been on full-year opera-
tion.
Encourage Four-Year Stay
In particular, Spurr stressed
that full-year operation is not
intended as an acceleration plan
and students are still encouraged
to attend the University for four
years. The two-fold purpose of
the plan is to increase the num-
ber of students serviced on cam-
pus and to make the third semes-
ter practical but not compulsory.
"We hope to make the full-
year calendar an attractive sys-
tem to students so that the Uni-
versity will get a more even load,"
Spurr said.
In answer to what the Univer-
sity can do to be of more service
to more summer students, he said
that it must come up with more
programs to interest students.
Summer Program
"The University has a definite
commitment to build up the sum-
mer program. Each dean will be
concerned with the students in
his particular school in finding out
what courses they want," Spurr
said.
The Summer Session Office will
continue to exist as a central in-
formation bureau and to print the
summer, session catalogue.
Spurr is an ex-officio coordina-
tor on the transition to full-year
operation and was executive sec-
retary of the project. Prof. Stuart

Churchill, chairman of the cheni-
ical and metallurgical engineer-
ing department, is chairman of a
three man sub-committee of the
University Senate's Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs which
is presently studying full year
operation.
CORRECTION
Instead of
THE GOLD RUSH
CINEMA GUILD
will present
early drama and comedy
SETTLED AT THE SEASIDE
THE LION AND THE SOUSE
FRIENDS
THE CLEVER DUMMY
LEAVE 'EM LAUGHING
Saturday and Sunday

STEVEN STOCKMEYER
... urges reform

University is obliged, having Join-
ed USNSA, to help the smaller
schools in it. 'If NSA is to grow
democratically, the regions should
also grow," he said.
Urges Initiative
Council member Robert Ross,
'63, said the University should take
the initiative in this region. He
felt that Council should have a
similar role in initiating action
in both the region and the na-
tional association.
"The University is a strong
school with many resources, and
it can make this region effective,"
he noted.
The remainder of the discussion
considered the Haber report, which
looks critically at the USNSA. One
of the items discussed was the
problem of the USNSA rule where-
by only ten policy issues may be
considered at the yearly USNSA
Congress meeting.
Ross defended the practice of
choosing the final 10 issues from
among a larger number. He ex-
plained that "the proliferation of
trivia", ,allows greater participa-
tion and gives individuals a great-
er sense of belonging.
USNSA 'Stagnant'
Stockmeyer advocated a gen-
eral reform of USNSA. Supplying,
figures showing USNSA has not
DeVarti To Seek
City Council Seat
Dominick A. DeVarti, a local
restaurant proprietor, announced
yesterday he will be a candidatea
for the City Council seat repre-
senting the Third Ward, the post1
to be vacated by Councilman
Henry V. Aquinto. DeVarti was
previously an unsuccessful can-
didate for mayor of Ann Arbor. ,

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Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30
Day Calendar
3:00 p.m.--Biomedical Data Processing
Training Program Guest Lecture Series
-Reginald G. Bickford, Physiology Sec-
tion of the Mayo Clinic, "Computer
Techniques and Research in Neurology":
3rd Level Amphitheater, Medical Science
Bldg.
4:15 p.m.-School of Music Student
Recital by Piano Majors-Lane Hall Aud.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Frederic March, Cameron Mitchell, and
Mildred Dunniock in Arthur Miller's
"Death of a Salesman"t: Architecture
Aud.
4:15 p.m.-Dept. of Psychology Collo-
quium--Dr. Howard Moltz, Brooklyn
College, "Imprinting: An Epigenetic Ap-
proach": Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Events
French Lecture: M .Rene Allewaert,
cultural attach6 of the French Embassy
in Chicago, will give a public lecture on
"Les Francais et La Litterature Ameri-
caine." This will be held on Tues., Dec.
4 at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Doctoral Examination for Roger Lau-
rence Cole, Germanic Languages & Lit-
erature; thesis: "The Ethical Founda-
tions of Rudolph Binding's 'Gentleman'
-Concept," Sat., Dec. 1, 1080 Frieze
Bldg., at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, F. X.
Braun.
Doctoral Examination for Alexander
Louis Cicchinelli, Biostatistics; thesis:
"The Composite of Two Gaussian Dis-
tributions as a Model for Blood Pres-
sure Distributions in Man," Sat., Dec.
1, 3008 School of Public Health, at 9:00
a.m. Chairman, F. E. Moore.
The Dept. of Aeronautical and Astro-
nautical Engrg. and the Dept. of Engrg.
Mechanics Seminar: Mon., Dec. 3, 4:00
p.m., Rm. 311 W. Engrg. Bldg. William
THE GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe Street
Friday noon lunch 25c
"Judaism in American
Society"
Prof. Norton Mezvinsky
Sunday, 9:30 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
Seminar
"History of Christian Thought"
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards
8:45 P.M. Conversation,
Refreshments, Social Hour.
Congregational, Disciples,
E & R, E U B Campus Ministry

S. Aiken, Jr., chief, Operations Research,
Office of Aeronautical Research, Nation-
al Aeronautic's and Space Administra-
tion, washington, D.C., will speak on
"The NASA Aeronautical Research Pro-
gram."
Coffee will be served at 3:30 in Rm.
214 W. Engrg. Bldg.
General Notices
CORRECTION: The Queen's Univ.,
Belfast, Ireland, offering an exchange
scholarship for a Univ. of Mich. grad
student which was announced in the
D.O.B. early this week has the deadline
for receipt of applications set for Jan.
14 and not Jan. 4.
Parking Lot Information: Staff Paid
Parking Lot S-5, S. State at Monroe Sts.
is now open for parking. Restrictions
are in force from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
daily.
Staff Meter Parking Lot S-22, 700
block Monroe St. is now open for park-
ing. Restrictions are in force from 6
a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
Psychology 250: Quiz No. 2 on Fri.,
Nov. 30 from 3 to 4 p.m. Students
whose lastrnames begin with A-M take
exam in 1025 Angell Hall and N-Z in 35
Angell Hall.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Wolverine Tube, Div. of Calumet &
Hecla, Inc., Detroit Mich. - 1) Ass't.
Project Metallurgist. Recent BS in
Chem. Engrg. or Metallurgical Engrg.
Indust. exper. pref. but not required.
2) Project Engnr.--recent BS in Mech.
Engrg. Design exper. pref., but not re-
quired.
Bartholomew County Hospital, Colum-
bus, Ind.-Opening for qualified Pharm-
acist. Female.
Atwood Vacuum Machine Co-, Rock-
ford, III.-Opening for Understudy to
the Corporate Treasurer. Degree Bus.
Ad. with Acc't. major & pref. a minor
in Econ. Exper. from 5 to 8 yrs. as Ac-
countant, Systems Analyst and/or Data
Processor.
Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Groton, Conn.
-Current tech. openings in Medical Re-
search Labs. are: Chemists (BS, MS &
PhD); Biochemist (PhD); Bacteriologists
(BS); & Biologists (BS, MS).
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co., Toledo,
Ohio-Two openings involving work or
studies relating to surface films: 1)
PhD Theoretical Physics-concentration
on classical physics with particular em-
phasis on electromagnetic theory &
physical optics. 2) BS Physics with
strong mathematics bkgd.
Anti-Tuberculosis League of Cleve-
land & Cuyahoga County, Cleveland,
Ohio-1) Program Assoc.-Health Infor-
mation & Services. Degree Public Health,
Educ., Journ., or related field. Exper.
in community health progs. desirable.
2) Program Assoc.-Community Organi-
zation. Mastersjin Public Health, Educ.,
Social Work or other related field. Ex-
per. in public health, specifically com-
munity organization work related to
health problems is desirable.
YWCA, Rochester, N.Y.-Opening for
Director of Health, Phys. Educ., & Rec
Dept. Woman with good administrative
& teaching exper. Pref. around 30 yrs.
old.
Atlantic Refining Co., Philadelphia,'
Pa.-Opening for MS in ChE to work
in Process Design Sect. of Engrg. &
Const. Dept. See Engrg. Placement forI
further information.
* * *
For further information, please call

General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have recorded
teaching vacancies for the second semes-
ter of the school year 1962-1963:
Detroit, Mich. .(Eastside Cooperative
Nursery, Inc.)-Part time dsteacher.
Madison Heights, Mich. (Madison Dist.
PS)-Now or second semester Elem. Voc.
Mus.
Marion, Mich.-Elem.
Monroe, Mich-Jr. HS Math.
St.Ignace, Mich.-Elem.; French or
French/Math.
Aspen, Col .(Dist No. 1)-HS French.
Elmiwood Park, 11.-Girl's PE.
Geneva, Il. (Dist. 304)-Elem.
Sheridan, 11. (Illinois Industrial Sch.
forBoys)-Math, Guid. Couns., Social
Worker, Psych.
St. Charles, Il. (Dist. 303) - Fifth
Grade; HS Eng.
Bourbon, Ind. (Tri-Township United
Sch.)-Hist/Girl's E.
Rochester, N.Y.-Elem., Vocal Music,
4th Grade; Jr. HS Engl., Soc. Stud.;
Art, Math, Engl., French, Soc. Stud.,
Spanish; Spec. Ed.
Maumee, Ohio-Latin.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Applicants for teaching positions in
the San Francisco secondary schools
must obtain a form "Notice of Examina-
tion Registration" from the Personnel
Division, San Francisco Unified School
District, 135 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran-
cisco 2, Calif. This must be filled out
and returned before Fri., Jan. 25, 1963.
Each applicant must also register for
the Common Examination of the Na-
tional Teachers Examinations and also
for the appropriate optional examina-
tions. This examination will be given
in Ann Arbor on Feb. 16, 1963. Applica-
tions must be obtained and fees paid
at 122 Rackham, before Jan. 15, 1963.
(Applicants who took this exam in 1960,
1961, or 1962 may submit official evi-
dence of those scores in lieu of scores
on the 1963 exam.)
Interviews will be held in San Fran-
cisco early in April, 1963, at times to
be individually assigned by the Per-
sonnel Division. The following docu-
ments must be submitted: Completed
application blank on the bufff-colored
card provided by the San Francisco
School District (this is in addition to
the "Notice of Examination Registra-
tion" blank) before Fri., March 1, 1963,
subscribed Loyalty Oath which is re-
quired by all public employes; Complete
transcripts of all college work; Photo-
static or certified copy of Discharge or
release from military service if appli-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion,
"Historical View of Religion in Ameri-
can Society," Norton Mezvinsky, Nov.
30, Noon, 802 Monroe.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society, Organiza-
tion or Full Society Meeting, Dec. 2,
7:30 p.m., Union.
* * *
International Students Assoc. & U. of
M. Folklore Soc., "American Folk Mu-
sic Evening"-Group Singing & Instru-
mental Playing, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m., In-
ternational Center. Refreshments. All
Welcome.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Meeting,
Topics: "Problems of Evolution," Roger
Cuffey, "An Excursion in Haiti," Larry
Davenport, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m., Union,
Rms. 3R & 3S.
* **
Newman Club, Fireside Chat, 8 p.m.,
Speaker: Fr. Brunnett, "Contraceptives
& the Natural Law"; Square Dance-
professional caller, 8:30 p.m.; Nov. 30,
331 Thompson.
r * *
Wesleyan Guild, Board of Directors
Luncheon, Noon; Young Marrieds Din-
ner, 6-8 p.m.; Nov. 30, Pine Room.
* * *
India Students Assoc., Movie: Kala
Pani, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater,

cant has been in service; confidential
information from placement office of
teacher training institution or college
including statements from the schools
in which the student teaching was
done. or from the college supervisor of
student teaching if the applicant has
no paid experience, or recent letters
from the principals or supervisors un-
der whom the applicant has taught.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg., during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30
til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Rm. 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Grad Electrical Engr. who has had
experience with an analog computer.
20 hours or more per week on a long
term 'basis.
1-Graduate Civil Engnr. with training.
in field astronomy or 3-dimensional
surveying techniques. 30 hrs. per
wk. on a flexible basis.
FEMALE
1-Keypunch operator with 2 years of
practical experience. Sat, and Sun.
nights, 8 to 11 p.m.
DIAL 6-6264
Feature Starts at
1:00-3:00-5:05
7:10 and 9:25
AOARRYFZANCK
M PRODUCTION

r~.

IT'S A HIT!
o'brien and james'
BARTHOLOMEW FAIR
Playing Through Saturday Night
HURRY ! A FEW SEATS LEFT
for the Saturday Matinee

BE AU COURANT !
See Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
THE GRASS HARP
by TRUMAN CAPOTE
Next weekend--Dec. 6, 7, 8-8:00 p.n.

Box Office (Trueblood)
opens Monday

Thurs. $1.50
Fri.-Sat. $1.75

N EW
Rockham Building Ballroom
Stag or Drag
Friday, November 30th ... 9 to 12 P.M.
Refreshments $1.00 Donation
ARDEN MIESEN'S BAND
Courtesy of Don Gillis
5pbnsored by Graduate Student Council.

Nov. 30-Discussion led by Dr. Herman Jacobs,
"Is Prayer Book Revision Enough"

Dec. 7-sponsored by ATI D
Dr. Jacob Lassner, "Jewish Messianic
tions in the Middle Ages"
Dec. 14-jointly with Beth Israel Center
Nahum Guttman, "Israel's Point Four
in Africa and Asia"
Jan. 7--sponsored by Alpha Epsilon Phi
Student sermonette
Oneg Shabbot

Expecta-
Program

I

TODAY
THROUGH
SATURDAY

MICHIGAN

DIAL
5-6290

I

giftf Follett's
A from
means more!
I-
K*
N:
R £

I

I

CAPUS]

DIAL 8-6416
Shows Today at
7 and 9 P.M.

VIRIDIANA
BANNED
IN ITS COUNTRY
OF ORIGIN
"THIS IS
UNQUESTIONABLY
A GREAT PICTURE!
Post
"A REMARKABLE
PIECE OF MOVIE
MAKING!"
:< $ :>';:> :> >¢?s'?:'"? :;: - Herold Tribune
"...Makes the orgy in
'La Dolce Vita'
look like a family picnic'
-N,Y. Daily News

he personai story
behind that survey..
from the controversial
best-selling novel.
Ci RBI0M jY S]} SECHNiCOLOR
No one under 16 will be admitted
unless acc m pan ied by an adlt.
A SUNDAY
Bette Davis 0 Joan Crawford
"WHAT EVER HAPPENED
TO BABY JANE?"

JOSEPH E. LEVINE presents
CORNELWLDE
ELINDA LEE
C N StANTINE
HE C ROSS
ARiSTINE'
SKAUFMANN

EASTMANCOLOR
TOTALSCOPE

MsoSoto. FwoslaTomii Io cARRCARlo NINCM Id. USACOG~
COMING "
SUNDAY:"eidO Adut n"

S. G.C. Citea qil
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00 Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00
Arthur Miller's EARLY COMEDY AND DRAMA
DEATH OF A SALESMAN C.s . L C

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