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September 11, 1962 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGANT fAIT.V

Yn w ww . .av..r.,.... ... ..,.... ...

m-. . vavn ara.zTUESDA~YSi

EPTEMBER:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - i

1 DIAMO

II.

NDS WATCHES
HALLE K'S
69ewe/erj
TO THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Score of Libraries, Service Divisions

11

10

)4 Years: 1858 to 19(
We welcome the Old Students and
invite the New Students to our store,
located just North of Main Campus.
1. University - near Hill Audito
COLLEGE JEWELRY

52

By DENISE WACKER
It is possible to get through four
years at the University without
once stepping into one of the
University's libraries, for books
can be obtained in dormitory li-
braries or in hometown libraries
or in drug stores.
And the people who don't step
into the libraries don't think they
have missed anything.
It is also possible to go through
four years of college and in the
process of being educated to wan-
der through the stacks of the Gen-
eral Library or listen to recordings
in the Undergraduate Library or
be enveloped by the dim glowing
past during a visit to the Clements
Library or Michigan Historical
Collections.
And the students who learn to
become lost in the libraries often

717iN

irium

JEWELRY

WATCH REPAIRING

I, II

STUDENT UNITED NATIONS
October 20 & 21
Here is your opportunity to develop fo appreciation for the
ethical values of other cultures, to participate in a basic re-
appraisal of the role of the United Nations, while having fun
becoming acquainted with students from other countries. If you
would like to take advantage of -this opportunity or want more
information about it, please fill out the following and return it
to the Michigan Union Sudent Offices.

think that people who never even
found the entrance have missed
something so essential to their ed-
ucation that nothing will ever
compensate for the loss.
The University has over 20 li-
braries or library service divisions.
With the exception of three of
these-the Clements Library, the
Law Library and the Business
Administration Library-they are
all under the financial and staff
auspices of the General Library.
The General Library, or as ti
is sometimes called, the University
or Graduate Library, is one of the
finest university libraries in the
country. The library holds approx-
imately 1.3 million volumes, which
includes not only printed books,
b u t some manuscripts, song-
sheets, use-maps, and microfilms.
Strange Construction
The General; Library, or as it
strangely - constructed building,
and many freshmen nave difficul-
ty finding the stacks-which\ are
open to all University students
and employes-the first time they
use the library.
For each floor of the main li-
brary, there are two "stack floors"
so that the tenth "story" of the
building is actually only a little
more than five stories high.
On each stack level, there are a
number of carrels, which are
rather small alcoves containing
desks, chairs, and book cases. The
carrels belong (for a one-year per-
iod) to graduate students, who ap-
ply to the library's Circulation
Department for a carrel assign-
ment, but may be used by under-
graduate students when the "own-
er" of the carrel isn't using it.
Pane-Glass View
Each carrel also has a large
pane-glass window and those lo-
cated on the upper, floors provide
full views of various areas of the
central campus, including the
President's house, the Diag, and
the Undergraduate Library.
Until about five years ago, un-
dergraduate students weren't per-
mitted carrel use and had to do all
their studying at the General Li-
brary in the Reference Room.
The Reference Room, a sort of
immense study hall (it extends the
full length of the library) is lo-
cated on the third floor (which is
the fifth stack level) of the li-

-Daily-Jerome Starr
CENTER OF CAMPUS-The General Library is located in the heart of the main campus facing
the Diag. It contains ten floors of books, microfilms, magazines and documents, and a rare book
room as well.

I

brary, just across
catalogues.
Multi-Lingual

from the card
References

11

Name_
Address.

In it encyclopedias written not
only in English, but in German
and French and several -other
modern languages are kept. Other
reference works, such as New York
Times Indexes, are =also housed in
the room.
Until 1958, when the Undergrad-
uate Library was opened, the Gen-
eral Library was the library for
literary college students.
Fred Dimock, circulation and
divisional librarian, admitted that
there has been a definite decline
in the number of undergraduate
students who have used the Gen-

eral's facilities during the last four
years.
However, despite this drop, one-
third of the books borrowed from
the library (62,126 volumes) were
taken out by undergraduate stu-
dents.
Prof. Frederick Wagman, direc-
tor of the University's libraries,
has said that this large amount
of undergraduate use is because
"gradually more and more people
want to use library facilities, The
General Library has more volumes
than t h e undergraduate, and
sometimes students find it more
condusive to studying."
Prof. Wagman also stressed that
the General Library is not one li-
brary, but a composite of several

_Telephone

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divisions housed in the same
building. Besides the library itself,
the Library Extension Service, the
Circulation Department, the Pho-
to-Duplicating Division, and the
Rare Book Room are housed in
the General Library building.
Rare Book Room
The Rare Book Room, although
open to undergraduates, is used
predominately by graduate stu-
dents and faculty members, Har-
riet Jameson, who is in charge of
the room, said.
The volumes (over 50,000 books,
and manuscripts) kept under the
Rare Book Room auspices are
non-circulating. Miss Jameson is
also charged with planning and
arranging the displays on the
main floor of the library,
This year, the number of ivol-
umes at the General Library in-
creased by some 40,000--and be-
cause there is rather. limited
stack space-a goodly number had
to be shifted to the library exten-
sion on North Campus.
Sees New Building
Prof. Wagman predicts that due
to the steadily increasing number
of volumes, a library annex, lo-
cated. at or near the area of the
General Library, will be built in
the next few years. However, he
added that no final plans can be
drawn up now because there are
no funds for such a building.
Several years ago, 'when funds
were available, the limited stack
space, as well as the realization
that the General Library could
not meet the needs of the under-
graduate made University admin-
istrators, educators, and, librari-
ans, consider building a library
specifically designed for the use
of the undergraduate student. It.
was a monumental task.
And when the planning was fin-
ished and the contractor had com-
pleted his work and the last drops

of turquoise and orange and bright
yellow paint applied, the under-
graduate library opened its doors.
That was in 1958.
UGLI Established
And since then, the Undergrad-
uate Library, or, as it si rather
graphically called the UGLI or
Undergrad, has become something
of an institution.
There aren't too many libraries
like it in the world.
Roberta C. Keniston, director
of the Undergrad, explained that
"a sort of national trend made us
build the library. In a university
where a lot of graduate students
do research, it becomes increas-
ingly difficult to give library ser-
vices to undergraduates.
Simplified Organization
"The library is organized for
their needs-everything is simpli-
fied," she admitted.
"There is also a very strong ref-
erence service and libraries are
always on duty to show the use
of the library. That's what we
want this to be-more than just a
library. We want it to be able to
instruct undergraduates in library
use so that they'll be able to go,
one day, into a large world of li-
braries and use them all well,"
Mrs. Keniston said.
Besides its volumes and instruc-
tional librarians, the UGLI offers
the undergraduate students and
the University community as a
whole features not found in any
other building on campus.
Multi-Purpose Room
A large hall-the Multi-Purpose
Room, may be used by any group
on campus which can show that
it wishes to use the room for an
educational or intellectual pur-
pose, so long as the event it spon-
sors is open to undergraduate stu-
dents.
Often student activities, like
Challenge (a program which of-
fers seminars and lectures on top-
ics of current interest) or Voice
Political Party, hold meetings or
discussions there. In 1961, "Oper-
ation Abolition" was shown In the
Multi-Purpose Room, which has
film facilities.
Another feature of the library
is the Audio Room, in which stu-
dents may listen to music or
spoken-word recordings.
Audio-Room Available
The Audio Room has 72 turn-
tables, each of which accommo-
dates two listeners, and a total of
144 students can use its facilities
at a time. Moreover, the library
owns 3,400 records which, while
they may not be taken from the
Audio Room, provide many stu-
dents with many enjoyable hours..
There are a number of courses
which require Audio Room attend-
ance. Among these are English
350 (a course dealing with the
plays of Shakespeare), various of
the foreign language departments'
intermediate and a d v a n c e d
courses, and of course, music lit-
erature.
The UGLI also uses the "re-
serve" book plan-under this, a
professor sends the library a list
of titles which are required read-
ing for his course, and these
books are put "on reserve."
Use Time Limits
This means that no one can
take them out of the library be-
fore 9 p.m. and that they must be
returned by the following morn-
ing. Very high fines ($.50 per
hour) are charged for unreturned
reserve books.
The Undergrad also has a num-

BE
0 0
WILD MAN

THE STORE THAT'S FAMOUS
FOR FASHION-FAMOUS NAMES

spoken here

With

Natural Shoulder

Fashion names you've come to know and depend upon as national

symbols of quality.

Names you knew at home, to be welcomed

as old friends-waiting for you at Jacobson's, your away from
home headquarters for college-right fashions from head to foot.

MAJOR {N STYLE

DALTON, PETTI, JAMES KENROB, STORM PLAY
Ci CI lDTIC ID Cri\D IICTI" ATGC

MAM'SELLE, JOHNNY HERBERT,
I AA I I I 9: D A A nr-AAnCI I G i/-\\// rA DC71/

I

I

i

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