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November 15, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:

E TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'FRANNY AND ZOOEY':
Murrays Cites Growth
Of Mature Awareness

Cantata Program

SHAUL SPEAKS:
Algerians Confront Economic Crisis

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
The quest for maturity in J. D.
Salinger's "Franny and Zooey" be-
gins not only with a disillusion-
ment with the phony world but
also with the realization of a phony
self, N. Patrick Murrays of the
English department said yester-
day.
Speaking to a luncheon gather-
ing of students under the auspices
of the Office of Religious Affairs,
IMurrays pointed out three gen-
erally accepted tenets of matur-
ity: the capacity to be objective
about oneself; a unity of purpose
in life which is a qualityof-per-
rsonal integrity; and the capacity
to give oneself.
"'Franny and Zooey' is a mag-
nificent statement of what all of
us go through in trying to become
mature persons in the world," he
said.
Disillusionment
Applying these tenets of matur-
ity to the stages of maturity in
Salinger's two stories, Murrays
noted ,that Franny's disillusion-
ment with the world is brought
out in her disgust with ego. She
finds the world "tiny, meaningless
and sad-making," she says.
Set Brish
Study Pla n
Three British universities will
offer programs this summer de-
signed for American students.
The University of Oxford will
offer a program on the history,
literature and the arts of 17th cen-
tury England. This will run from
July 1-Aug. 9.
A program on British history,
philosophy and literature 1688-
1832 will be held at the University
of Edinburgh from July 1-Aug. 9.
From July 8-Aug. 16 the Uni-
versity of Birmingham will con-
duct a course of study on Shakes-
peare and Elizabethan Drama, to
be held at Stratford-upon-Avon.
The courses are designed for
graduate students and undergrad-
uates who have completed two
years of university work.j
Winifred Banforth, secretary of
the summer schools in Englandj
and Scotland for American Stu-
dents, will be on campus to meet
with'Interested students at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in 2013 Angell Hall.

Murrays pointed out that the
next stage of her development is
the most crucial insight in the
book. Zooey tells her that her own
happiness is much more important
than that of others, and that she
does not accept the responsibility
for the- phony situation of the
world.
Zooey tells Franny that her Jesus
Prayer binge itself might be phoni-
ness and egoism. Murrays feels this
denunciation bursts Franny's bal-
loon.
Final Stage
The final stage in the book is
Zooey's espousal of the need to ac-
cept self-responsibility in the real
world. Murrays cited Zooey's hid-
ing of Franny's "Pooh" books as
a sign that she must grow up and
face the world to get out of her
spiritual crisis.
A main point, according to Mur-
rays, is that there is a difference
between phoniness and merely bad
situations or people. As Zooey
points out, Franny must not just
withdraw from the world but must
accept responsibility for it, as
Christ did.
In Zooey's final onslaught
against Franny's beliefs, he tells
her that she knows nothing about
religion and does not feel kin-
ship with Christ because she can-
not perceive the sacredness of or-
dinary experience. Her religion is,
instead, detachment, while sal-
vation lies in personal identifi-
cation with all human individuals.
Murrays interpreted the r two
stories as saying that the latter
direction leads away from detach-
ment, to struggle within the world.
Climax
He sees the climax of the book
as Zooey's revelation that one
must strive for experience and in-
tegrity for the ordinary people who
are really not ordinary: for the
Fat Lady. Everyone is the Fat7
Lady and, in turn, she is Christ.
The last stage of the book de-
picts achievement of reconciliation1
within the real world, Murrays said(
in conclusion.1

By BARBARA PASH
The Algerian population is
caught up in the novelty of in-
dependence, United States Nation-
al Student Association President
Dennis Shaul said Tuesday.
Shaul visited Algeria during the
independence celebrations on Oct.
31 and Nov. 1. During his one-
week stay, he observed that des-
pite the excitement, the country
faces a major economic crisis.
"Seventy per cent of the people
are unemployed. This poverty is
the government's main concern at
the moment," he noted.
Raise Econonmic Level
In order to raise the economic
level, the government is trying
to build up its basic industries. It
is attempting to attract capital
Atnnounce Opening
Of Art Exhibition
The Artists' Gallery, a coopera-
tive establishment to exhibit
paintings, pottery, sculpture, prints
and drawings, will open at 7 p.m.
today in Ann Arbor. The gallery's
exhibits are all produced by an
association of artists from the
Detroit-Ann Arbor area, who own
and operate the gallery.

investors from foreign countries.
"The question is whether they
are going to seek aid from the
West or from the Soviet Union,"
Shaul continued.
The foreign aid negotiations
with the United States were re-
cently broken off. The Algerians
say this was caused by the United
States; the Americans claim that
the Algerians precipitated it. "Re-
gardless of the cause, I suspect
that Algeria is playing the same
aid game as the Egyptians."
Anything connected with France
is suspected of being "colonial," he
said. Thus, America is considered
colonial because of its ties with
France.
Red China
"The Algerian leaders consider
their revolution identical with
Cuba. They view the Red Chinese
as more friendly than the Soviet
Union, because Chinese ideology
is more involved with the tactics
of revolution," $haul declared.
However, they would not say
that their revolution was Com-
munist, since to them it was anti-
colonial and pro-Algerian. They
don't feel committed to Com-
munism; rather, they are com-
mitted to being independent at
all costs, he noted..
"The contradiction in this is
that the leaders do not see the
Soviet Union as a colonial power.
They don't talk about Hungary
or the subservience of the Eastern
Eukropean satellites," Saul ex-
plained. "They point to the po-
sition of Yugoslavia as the in-
dependence wnich can be achiev-
ed in the Soviet bloc."

Presently, there is close co-
operation with the United Arab
Republic, but this cannot last long.
It seems inevitable for competi-
tion to arise between these two
states.
In their attempt to extricate
themselves from their economic
situation, the Algerians have talk-
ed about a one-party state. They
have already nationalized some
industries.
"The type of experience Algeria
is likely to go through in 1the next
few years, a periodgduring wnicn
they will probably move closer to
Communism, will require a so-
phisticated response from France
and the United States," Shaul
said.
The United States must make
it clear that it does not like the
situation, but must not completely
withdraw foreign aide to Algeria.
This imposes the necessity for a
delicate aid program.
It is interesting to note that
the largest trade union in Algeria
is anti-Ben Bella, he continued.
"Everyone is waiting to sere how
much progress he can make,"
Shaul remarked.
Appoint Co-Head
For Spring Gala
The Women's Athletic Associa-
tion announced recently that
Michael Schover, '64, will replace
Carolyn Allen, '63, as co-chairman
of Spring Weekend. Miss Schover
will work with Loyal Eldridge, '63,
on the biennial event.

-Daily-Ed Amos
CANTATAS SINGERS-Mrs. Harold Duerksen directs the Ann
Arbor Cantatas Singers in a dress rehearsal of the program of
Bach cantatas 21, 161, 56 and 50, to be given at 8:30 p.m. Monday
in Rackham Lecture Hall. The cantatas will be performed with a
full Bach orchestra.

@
SEA TTLE
'in
Wol'sFi
12 noniAM
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STUDENT CONTACT:
Assembly Pooe Faculty Program'

By BARBARA LAZARUS
Assembly Association Executive
Board and members of dormitory
house councils have proposed a
new Faculty Associate Program to
create "frequent informal contact
between faculty and students,"
Joyce Leix, '64, Assembly activi-
ties and scholarship chairman, said
yesterday.
The proposed program, which
would not abolish existing facul-
ty dinners, would have a faculty
member associated with a dormi-
tory house. The professor could
become better acquainted with res-
idents by coming to lunches or din-
ners as often as once a week and

Across Campus

Prof. Victor L. Ehrenberg of the
University of London will speak on
"Society and the Civilization in the

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Due tohExtreme Length
One Show Nightly ot
7:30
Monday through Friday

DIAL 8-6416 *
he First 3-Act Motion Picture Ever Presented!
JOSEPH E.
LEVINE t
Pr~uo~d by
CARLO
PONTI

Archaic Age of Greece" at 4:10
p.m. today in Aud. A. His lecture
is sponsored by the classical stud-
ies department.
Area Studies.. .
Prof. Robert A. Scalapin of the
University of California will speak
on the "Approaches of Political
Science to Developing Areas Stud-
ies" at 8 p.m. today in Aud. A. The
talk is sponsored by the Graduate
Roundtable.
ACLU...
Roland O'Hare, chairman of the
state branch of the American Civ-
il Liberties Union, will speak on
"State Programs and Activities of
ACLU" at 7:30 p.m. today in the
basement of the Ann Arbor Public
Library. He will address the Ann
Arbor-Washtenaw County ACLU
public meeting.
Recital...
Karl Wolfram, celebrated Ham-
burg lutenist and baritone, will
present a lecture recital on "Ger-
man Leider from the Middle Ages
to Modern Times" at 8 p.m. today
in Aud. A. The program is spon-
sored by the German department
and the Michigan League.

by being invited to special house
parties, Miss Leix added.,
The main problem with faculty
dinners is that they are held too
infrequently, and a house may
have only three a semester. This
infrequency is caused by the many
arrangements which need to be
made, often by only one person,
the scholarship chairman, Miss
Leix pointed out.
Supplement
The proposed Faculty Associate
Program would serve as a supple-
ment to existing faculty dinners.
This type of program has been
operating in varying forms in
men's residence halls and was pro-
posed for the women's dormitor-
ies at the 1961 Assembly Work-
shop.
The proposed program is pres-
ently pending approval from the
Residence Halls Board of Gover-
nors.
"This program would not be mi-
tiated as an entireAssembly proj-
ect, but each house would adopt
it if it wanted to. It would be un-
der the guidance of each house's
scholarship or activities chair-
man," she said.
The exact relationship of the
associate and residents will be
worked out within each house, and
the ideal association would be for
one year. At the end of the year
the association could be renewed
or terminated, depending on the
wishes of the house or instructor,
Miss Leix added.
Barbour Program
"Betsy Barbour Hall decided last
year to initiate its own associate
program, and presently Prof. Guy
Swanson of the sociology depart-
ment is its faculty associate."
The program would also allow
faculty members to participate
with their spouses.

"A brief sketch of the program
has already been presented to the
Residence Halls Business Office
and met with its approval. The ex-
pense of the meals is to be han-
dled by this office."
Other Ideas
It is also possible a student
speaker program could be integrat-
ed with a faculty associate pro-
gram. The house could stimulate
discussion on current issues, with
the faculty associate participating
informally in any discussion, Miss
Leix added.
One instructor would be asso-
ciated with each house, except in
the case of larger houses, where
more than one would be desirable.
"Assembly sees in this program
potential for better communication
between faculty and students and
feels that it can result in an im-
portant contribution to residence
hall living."
Economists
Confer at 'U'.
World-famed economists will
gather at the University today and
tomorrow for the 10th annual
Conference on the Economic Out-
look.
Among the participants review-
ing the balance of payments prob-
lem, the impact of the European
Common Market upon the United
States and other related topics will
be Prof. James Tobin of Yale Uni-
versity, formerly a member of the
President's Council of Economic
Advisers.
"The Michigan Econometric
Forecast for 1963," prepared by]
members of the economics depart-
ment, also will be presented at
the conference.

HELD OVER
Dial
5-6290
A NEW JOY HAS COME TO
THE SCREEN...AND
THE WORLD IS A HAPPIER
PLACE TO LIVE IN!
JACUE41

1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

EXCITING ROOM
SIZE DISPLAYS
from:
AFRICA
ARAB LANDS
CHINA
ESTONIA
GREECE
INDIA
INDONESIA
IRAN
ISRAEL
JAPAN
KOREA
LATVIA
LITHUANIA
PAKISTAN
PHILIPPINES
PUERTO RICO
SCANDINAVIA
THAILAND
TURKEY
UKRAINE
VENEZUELA
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"Gleason has a
gift of mimicry
that verges on
genius"
-Time Mag.

ed
*Pronounced GEE-GO

KCO o

NEW

"HATARI"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

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kLxj&. I

VITTORIODeSICA FEDERICQ FELLINI LUCHINO VISCONTI
directs the Academy Award Winner directs directs
SOPIIIA LOREN ANITA EKBERG ROMYPSCHNEIDER
An Embassy-International Pictures Release in EASTMAN COLOR

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

MUSKET '62 presents
MUJ
o'brien e. james'
B ARTHOLOMEW FAIR
NOV. 28-DEC. 1 LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
SEATS: $1.50 and $2.00
x TICKETS NOW ON SALE IN UNION LOBBY
12 to 5 P.M. Daily, 9 to 12 Saturday
S£L Apo % wM %NIfa 0 MNE2f % - NWf

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial respon si-
bility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Day Calendar
8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.-Tenth Annual
Conference on the Economic Outlook-
Registration: Foyer, Rackham Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Dept. of Classical Studies
Lecture-Victor L. Ehrenberg, Univ. of
London, "Society and Civilization in the
Archaic Age of Greece": Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
7:00 and 9:00 .p.m-ClinemaaGuild-
Orson Welles, Joseph Cotton, and Agnes
Mooreheadin "Citizen Kane": Archi-
tecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Political Science-
Grad Round Table-Prof. Robert A.
Scalapino, Univ. of Calif., Berkley, "The
Approaches of Political Science to the
Study of Developing Areas": Rackham
Assembly Hall.
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of German and Mich.
League Lecture Recital-Karl Wolfram,
lutenist and singer from Hamburg, Ger-
many, "German Lieder from the Middle
Ages to Modern Times": Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Concert-
Univ. Symphony Orchestra, Josef Blatt,
conductor: Hill Aud.
Film Showing: "Checkmate," cover-
ing the deployment of TAC, and Air

Interdiction will be shown in the Multi-
Purpose room of the UGLI at 4:05 p.m.
today by the Arnold Air Society.
General Notices
British Summer Sessions: The Secre-
tary of the Summer Schools in England
and Scotland for American Students,
Miss Winifred Banforth, would like to
meet all students interested in Summer
Courses at , British universities. The
meeting will be held on Fri., Nov. 16, in
2013 Angell Hall at 4:15 p.m.
Further information about courses
this summer in British universities may
be obtained from Clark Hopkins, 2011
Angell Hall.
Events
Student Government Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Inter-
national Student Friendships-work-
shop, Nov. 17, 9:30-4:30, 3529 SAB.
Lecture: "Enzymatic Hydrolysis of the
Nitrile Group of Ricinine" by Dr. Rob-
ert H. Hook, Dept. of Biological Chem-
istry, The U-M. At 4:00 p.m., Fri., Nov.
16, in M6423 Medical Science Bldg. Cof-
fee will be served in the Dept. of
Biological Chemistry M5410 at 3:30 p.m.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., Nov.
16, 4:15 p.m., The Observatory. Dr.W.
(Continued on Page 5)

Cinema quild

PRESENTS

_Thursday and Friday

CITIZEN KANE

Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten,
Agnes Moorehead
(Disguised life of Win. Randolph Hearst)
ACADEMY AWARD
Saturday and Sunday
DISNEY PROGRAM
Alice in Wonderland. COLOR.
Plus Disney vintage cartoons.

5 SPARKLING
NEW 90-MINUTE
VARIETY SHOWS
See for yourself:
African Folk Festival
Arab Dabka Dance
Chinese "Dance of the
Silver Plates"
Estonian Folkdance
Greek "Butcher,," "Is-
land," and "Calanata"
Dances
Indian Gujrati Folk
Dance
Indonesian "Balinese"
Dance
Israeli Folk Dance
Japanese Hamachidori
and Kojo no Tsuki
Korean Folk Festival
Latvion Little Thunder
Dance
Lithuanian Folk Dances
Pakistani Mehfil-e-
Qawa lli Folksong
Philippine Bamboo Pole
Dance
Fairy Tales of
Scandinavia
Thai Candle Dance
Turkish "Zeybek oyunu"
Fol kdance
Ukrainian Kozachok
Flirtation Dance
Venezuelan Folk Dance
and Latin Parade
, _L-

Winner of 10 A cadem y Awards!I
BEST 7|c"on:bd|W|, ' BEST*;p*.'*t *g BEST Art frecl|- BEST 'tr* ,, BEST
BEST podctr. BESTl"m;'to*rPhy BEST Sound BEST " Flm Editing l'
- Rim m 1111111v (color)

ID',
10

I

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HELD OVER
AGAIN!!

7il 11

4th BIG
WEEK

LECTURE RECITAL
KARL WOLFRAM
R vn.nranr /,Y4nn .- T -44 f 4 nnC Linn ,

Citizen Kane, Orson Welles'
first and most renowned film,
was a barely disguised biog-
raphy of the dynamic and con-
troversial publisher, William
Randolph Hearst, who built up
a newspaper empire, swayed
natonal nnies ,and h nae

tensified by his chiaroscuro
lighting and naturalistic dia-
logue.
The greatness of Alice in
Wonderland is so firmly lodged
in verbalisms and parody that
it cannot be conveyed to an-
other medium. While Disney is
a. m,-yacf f n fantana he ran An

STATE
TLFATDR

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