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November 13, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

x rr ojvcS v .Vr tlAJ i,,t3, J 16

CHARGE SUBVERTED CONCEPTS:
Students Enumerate Purpose
Underlying USNSA Situation

By RICHARD KRAUT
"Has the United States National
Student Association subverted its
original purpose?" and "what does
the organization (do for the cam-
pus?" were the two major ques-
tions discussed in a debate on
UENSA, held Sunday.
William Madden, '63L, and Stu-
dent Government Council Presi-
dent Steven Stockmeyer, '63, de-
bated in favor of withdrawal from
USNSA. On the pro-USNSA side
were Paul Potter, Grad., and Rob-

Stockmeyer's co-debator, Mad-
den, argued that because "student
government representatives are
not elected because of their view-
points on international issues,
USNSA is misrepresenting the
American student."
Madden also charged that
USNSA is run by a "manipulative
elite." "The leaders act as a con-
scious, manipulative group, far re-
moved from the sentiments of the
students," he said.
As to the charge that USNSA
had subverted its original purpose,
Ross said that it is still "one of
the only organizations that en-
courages students to consider what
education is all about."

STEVEN STOCKMEYER
... views faults

ert Ross, '63. Prof. Lionel Laing
of the political science depart-
ment moderated.
In his opening statement, Stock-
meyer charged that USNSA had
2 eparted from its original purpose,
and, in the opinion of last semes-
ter's Council, become a showcase
for extremist viewpoints.
Partisan Politics
"USNSA's real concern is with
partisan political programs, not
with promoting better student
government," Stockmeyer said.
"It cannot be improved by chang-
ing its formal structure, but by
changing the concepts of those in
power," he added.
Stockmeyer also asserted that
the emphasis at a national con-
grss is not on the actual issues,
but on committing USNSA to a
particular stand.
Furthermore, he said that there
was no such thing as a student
community with respect to politi-
cal viewpoints.

New Demands
Ross claimed that the cold war
and the growing importance of
technology have made new de-
mands on education.
Potter listed a few of what he
considered USNSA's accomplish-
ments. In the international field,
he said that the International Stu-
dents' Conference, an organization
which depends largely on USNSA
for support, is the only democratic
alternative to the International
Union of Students, a Communist-
controlled group.
"In 1950, there were no Com-
munist-dominated unions of stu-
dents in Latin America, today
there are 10. USNSA is the only
organization that can work for an
alternative to these groups," Pot-
ter noted.
"USNSA h1as instituted the only
successful literacy program out-
side of Cuba," he continued. "And
during the Algerian revolution,
we brought 40 student leaders to
the United States to study - stu-
dents that would have gladly.
studied in the Soviet Union had.
they not been invited here."
Set Meeting
.for Debaters
The University Varsity Debate
Team will debate the Oxford Uni-
versity Debate Team at 4 p.m.
today in Rackham Aud. on the
resolution: "Should radio and
television broadcasting be removed
from commercial ownership."
Oxford will take the affirmative
in the debate, which is being co-
sponsored by the Cultural Affairs
Committee of the Michigan Union
and the speech department.

PAUL POTTER
.. . explains benefits

Potter also listed several USNSA
national achievements. He said
that USNSA has been instrumen-
tal in stirring activity on academ-
ic freedom. The deans of schools,
the American Association of Uni-
versity Professors and the federal
government have increasingly been
turning to USNSA for the stu-
dent's viewpoints, Potter said.
On the question of whether or
not USNSA has done anything for
the University, S t o c k m e y e r
charged that the USNSA propon-
ents have had enough time to in-
form the campus on the relevant
issues.
He also complained that the ref-
erendum would not take place in
a normal. campus situation, be-
cause several organizations are
making a special attempt to in-
form the campus on USNSA.
Helped SGC
Ross said that USNSA has
helped on at least three major re-
cent SGC projects. One was a
suggestion that the University of-
fer a course on peace and the nu-
clear age. This idea was supplied
by USNSA.
In addition, materials from
USNSA were used in writing SGC's
comment on the Reed Report,
which recommended changes in
the philosophy and structure of
the Office of Student Affairs.
Finally, Ross mentioned the re-
cent motion asking an SGC com-
mittee to consider the problems of
student labor. This motion, Ross
said, was a result of a USNSA dis-
cussion.

Candidates
View Issues
Of Election
(Continued from Page 1)
dation of the judiciary structure
are important Council concerns,
according to Kass.
He favors continued participa-
tion in USNSA.
DAVID NELSON - He wants
Council to create a student travel
service which would provide trans-
portation during vacations. Nelson
supports a student bill of rights
and a reorganization of the judi-
cial structure. He believes that the
student is "the backbone of ,the
University" and that paternalism
must be eliminated. He would like
the University to withdraw from
USNSA because it does not speak
for a majority of students. Nelson
would favor the creation of a stu-
dent advisory committee on aca-
demics.
REGINA ROSENFELD - She
says that the University's speaker
bylaw is not necessary to reinforce
existing state and federal laws
prohibting speeches on the force-
ful overthrow of the government.
Council should work to eliminate
discrimination against foreign stu-
dents and with the International
Student Association.
She also supports cntinued par-
ticipation in USNSA because it
provides "vital channels of com-
munication between American and
foreign students."
ROBERT ROSS - He supports
due process for incorporation in
the judicial structure. The speaker
bylaw should be repudiated be-
cause students are capable of
weighing the value of proposals
Ross maintains. He supports US-
NSA because it works for reforms
for higher education. Ross says he
would favor a student committee
to campaign for Regents before
the spring Regental election.
STEVEN STOCKMEYER - He
would like the University to with-
draw from USNSA because "it is
naive to try to stay in and reform,"
and because there is no "com-
munity of students," which can be
represented. He would favor a stu-
dent bill of rights which also in-
cluded a list of student responsi-
bilities. Stockmeyer supports Coun-
cil power in requiring the member-
ship selection practices state-
ments.
FRANK STROTHER-He says
that Council should work to estab-
lish a student book store and to
improve communications with the
campus. He favors withdrawal
from USNSA because it provides
"no worthwhile services." Student
opinions on off campus issues
should only be expressed when
there is adequate information and
when the expression will have an
effect, he feels.
THOMAS SWANEY-He favors
withdrawal from USNSA because
it is removed from campus issues.
On the membership statements is-
sue he believes that Council should
try to get statements from the sor-
orities who have not as of yet sub-
mitted them. He would like Coun-
cil to increase its power in aca-
demic and judicial areas.

(Continued from Page 1)
testing. The thirteenth congress
"supported the continuing nuclear
test ban negotiations and all ser-
ious efforts to realize an effective
and definite agreement concerning
the cessation of nuclear bomb
testing."
The fourteenth congress also
urged the signing of an arms con-
trol treaty, with "general disarma-
ment based on effective controls
and inspection measures."
During the current campaign,
many candidates have expressed
the view that student government
should demand an increasing role
in the formation of academic pol-
icy. At its national congress,
USNSA set up the machinery that
would facilitate such a policy.
Prepare Mailing
The delegates mandated the na-
tional office to prepare a mailing
to all member schools which would
include:
1) General background material
relating the necessity for respon-
sible student consideration of aca-
demic policy formation;
2) Guidelines for the establish-
ment of student government edu-
cation committees and other pro-
Steering Body
Airs Proposal
.On Counseling
The open meeting of the liter-
ary college Steering Committee
considered proposals yesterday for
a descriptive booklet or, alternat-
ively, a system of conferences in
various fields.
Discussing the general topic of
counseling, the meeting first de-
cided that the present descriptive
booklet is inadequate. The exis-
tence of this collection of course
descriptions, which covers only se-
lected courses, is virtually un-
known to the students.
Also, the booklet is outdated
and does not give the information
that the student seeks. Questions
the student would want answered
would cover stimulus, interest, and
the competence of the professor.
The advantages of course de-
scription in booklet form would
be that the booklet reaches most
of the students and that it in-
cludes more information. How-
ever, it would be outdated quickly,
and it would present only one
opinion of a course.
One proposal for an oral pres-
entation was that students major-
ing in one field could get, together
and hold a discussion group, pre-
senting course evaluations.
Glass To Discuss
Family Changes
Mrs. David Glass will lead a
discussion on the effect on family
life of a wife's outside activities
at noon today in the Internation-
al Center recreation roon,

USNSA Passes Programs
On Various World Concerns

grams pertinent to academic pol-
icy;
3) A bibliography of available
source material, including existing
USNSA publications and informa-
tion from other agencies.
Another resolution, given high-
est priority on the calendar, con-
gratulated the students of Algeria
for "the courageous role they
played, often at great risk, in con-
tributing to the struggle for in-
dependence waged by the Alger-
ian people."
The congress initiated a drive
to collect books for the University
of Algiers to help support the
Union General des Etudiants Mus-
ulmans Algeriens, the national stu-
dent union of Algeria.
Foreign Representatives
In addition, the representatives
of several n'ational unions of stu-
dents attending the congress ad-
dressed the plenary. Among these
was an officer of the Zengakuren,
a Japanese student organization.
In a high priority program man-
date, the delegates took action to
increase the understanding of in-
ternational affairs on campuses in
the United States.
The congress mandated the
USNSA Campus International Ad-
ministrator to make information
available so that student govern-
ments would be able to:
International Involvement
1) Emphasize international in-
volvement as a part r of freshman
orientation;
2) Support efforts to increase
the number of foreign students on
campus, and explore all possibili-
ties for obtaining additional schol-
arships, non-discriminatory hous-
ing and employment opportunities
for foreign students;
3) Encourage fore gn student
participation and leadership in
student government and in other
campus activities.
Before the legislative plenary,
more than twenty committees met
to separately discuss the issues of
the congress. Some of the topics
were the aims of education, the
student and the curriculum, cur-
rent concerns in higher educa-
tion, in loco parentis, principles
and procedures ofastudent aca-
demic freedoms, academic free-
doms and civil liberties problems,
student government authority on
campus, the role of the student
government on campus and stu-

11

ii

L'Alliance Francaise
and Ie Cercle Francais
Present
LES JEUX doeL'AMOUR
a gay comedy

Y

Tuesday, Nov. 1

8 P.M.

.1

Multi purpose room UGLI

Members Free

Membership $1 at door

r

SOPH SHOW-

'62

I

BYE BYE BIRDIE

Nov. 1

5,

16,

&

17.

SATURDAY SOLD OUT
Tickets at Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office

dent government's relation
campus organizations.

with

MUSKET '62 presents,
o'brien james.
BARTHOLOMEW FAIR
NOV. 28-DEC. 1 LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
SEATS: $1.50 and $2.00
TICKETS NOW ON SALE IN UNION LOBBY

Vedder Dies,
After Illness
Prof. Francis B. Vedder of the
dentistry school died recently after
a long illness. He hadretired from
the University this summer.
Prof. Vedder was a charter
member and later president of the
American Academy of Crown and.
Bridge Prosthodontics. He served
for three terms on the public re-
lations committee of the Univer-
sity Senate. Prof. Vedder was
also secretary of the dentistry
school for 38 years.

I- HELD OVER AGAIN
V _al um13RD BIG WEEK
4IIIi t~jiwI~Winner©of 10
m u aa5,, Academy Awards!
Dial 2-6264 ES
~~~BPICTUREO H ERI
,NEW YORK FILM CRITICS' AWARDJ
; WEST SIDE STORY: IS A CIN-
EMA MASTERPIECE! THE PER-
FORMANCES ARE TERRI FIC!"
' - Bosley Cowher, New York Times
Schedule of Performances
Mon.-Tues. -Wed.-Thurs.
at 2 and 8 p.m.
Fri.-Sat.-Sun: at 2,
6:45, 9:25 p.m.
Weekday Matinee 90c
Nights and Sunday $1'.25
Rn. Children All Times 50c

}DAILY OFFICIAL BULETI
.'..la rflfflVP %v.......

TI

Opening meeting: Hussey Room, 2nd
Floor, Mich. League.
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech and Mich.
Union Cultural Affairs Committee As-
sembly-Oxford Univ. Varsity Debate
Team (affirmative) vs. Univ. of Mich.
Varsity Debate Team (negative),
"Should Radio and Television Broad-
casting Be Removed from Commercial
Ownership?": Rackham Lecture Hall.
8:00 p.m.-Film Board of.the United
Nations Movie-French motion picture
"Passion for Life": Architecture Aud.
General Notices
College of Architecture and Design:
Midsemester grades are due on or be-
fore Tues., Nov. 13. Please send them
to 207 Architecture Bldg.
"Carmen" Tickets, all $1.00, now on sale
by mail order. Performances Wed.
through Sat., Dec. 5-8, 8:00 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, with the Univ.
Players presenting the Opera Dept.,
School of Music. Send orders to Car-
men, U-M Players, Frieze Bldg., en-
DIAL 5-6290
A NEW JOY AS COME TO THE SCREEL...ANO
THE WOLDIS A!NAIPPI CE TOUVELEI!

closing stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope. Checks payable to U-M Players.
Final Payment of Fall Semester Fees
is due and payable on or before Nov.
26, 1962.
If fees are not paid by this date:
1) A $10.00 delinquent penalty will
be charged.
2) A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until
payment is received and "Hold Credit"
is cancelled:
1) Grades will not be mailed.
2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
3) You may not register for future
semesters.
4) A senior may not graduate with
his class at the close of the current
semester.
(Continued on Page 8)
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING WEDNESDAY *
ANDRE CAVArMS'
Tomorro w
is myIt urn
Golden Lion
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
1st prize
90ARlES AZVOUR - NICOLE COURC
6EORGES IVEE. COROULAIRANO

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads
STUDENT LUNCHEON
DISCUSSIONS
12:00 to 1:00 P.M.
Terrace Room, 2nd Floor, Michigan Union
Sandwich, Fruit, & Beverage will be provided for $:25
ALL ,STUDENTS WELCOME
Wednesday, November 14, 1962
'The Quest for Maturit
in FRANNY and ZOEY'
Leader: N. PATRICK MURRAY
Instructor-"Great Books" Course

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

'Education and Morals'
Leader: WILLIAM JELLEMA
Professor of Higher Education
Wednesday, December 5, 1962

If

"N > " 1 I 1 111

/ri UI 10 0 ~ _1 * I! - --_L

III

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