100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1962 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER11 1962

U' ALUMNI CLUBS:
Rea, Student Governors View OSA

TREAT STUDENT ILLS:
Health Service Dirn

By LOUISE LIND
Walter B. Rea, director of fi-,
nancial aids of the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, told the Student Gov-
ernors of the University Alumni
Clubs yesterday in the Henderson
Room. of the Michigan League that
the OSA, recently reorganized
along functional lines, will oper-
ate smoothly and properly, once
people are aware of the changes'
that have been made.
"Until such time, there are
bound to be some misinterpreta-
tions and misunderstandings," he
commented.
Rea emphasized the importance,
of the Office of Financial Aids
and analyzed its function within
the OSA structure. "This office
serves to consolidate all funds
available to undergraduates," he
noted, "and to appeal for more
Offers Students
Second Flu Shot
The second flu shot will soon
be given to those who received
their first flu shot in September.
Students may get their shots
at Health Service Wednesday
thrugh Friday, Nov. 14-16, at 8:00-
11:30 a.m. and 1:00-4:30 p.m.
Those who wish to receive flu
shots for the first time may also
do so. Over 7500 were given their
first flu shots in September.

financial aid from outside groupsg
whenever possible."
Role of the State
Rea said that it is the role ofN
state to make a standard higher
education available to all the
qualified, sincere deserving peoplet
who desire it.
"The use of state funds to pro-
vide better public higher educa-
tion is a good investment of the
state's money," he commented. "It
is a long-term, rather than a
short-term investment.
"If the state is unable to pro-
vide the necessary funds, and we
are approaching this condition, it
should seek out federal aid."
University Research
Seventy per cent of all organ-
ized University research and one-
half of the nation's doctoral can-
didates are presently supported by
federal funds, Rea related.
"Many people believe that fed-
eral aid has saved research as a
function of the universities," he
noted.
Describing the National Defense
Education Act funds, he told how
federal loan money is matched
and allocated by the University.
Loss of Funds
"When Congress failed to raise
the ceiling on this fund in the last
session, the University lost what
probably would have amounted to
$250,000 more in federal loans,";
he said.
Rea's hosts, the Student Gov-
ernors, are participants in a pro-;

gram founded seven years ago in
an effort to relate alumni clubs
across the nation more directly
with the University.
Each governor is responsible for
reporting new developments in the
University to his sponsoring local
alumni group.

<";

By BARBARA LAZARUS I
Health Service has a staff of 10'
full time physicians who see from
200-300 patients a day during the
winter months at the general clin-
ic, Dr. Morley Beckett, director of
Health Service said.
"The facilities of Health Ser-
vice offer 50-60 beds for studenti
use, if their case requires bed rest.
If the student needs an emer-
gency operation, he may be sent
to University Hospital and receive
free surgery and room up to 15
days."
The varied facilities of Health
Service include an emergency den-
tal clinic, a pharmacy and num-
erous special clinics.
Special Clinics
"These special clinics include
allergy, nose and throat, derma-1
tology and orthopedic surgery.
These clinics are staffed by pro-
fessors from the Medical School
who rotate on different days."
The Mental Hygene Department
is also a special part of Health
Service which treats students with
personality, emotional or neuro-
logical problems. It has a working
staff of, three psychiatrists and
seven psychiatric social workers.
There is a small charge of the
use of special clinics, but there is
no charge for the general clinic or
the Mental Hygiene Department,
Dr. Beckett said.
"Health Service does not have
interns or medical students on its

'Ctor Lists Facilities
try to remedy any such situations," Service offers is very high and we
he noted. attempt to treat each student as a
Dr. Beckett said that visiting personal case."
hours in the infirmary must be
fairly limited, because the pa- Ann Arbor May
tients need rest. It is very diffi- Ar o yor
cult to operate with numerous ,k Re-Election
people constantly in the wards.

WALTER B. REA
... analyzes OSA

staff. No person is hired unless he
has had at least two years resi-
dency completed."
As a service to University staff
members, Health Service gives
thorough examinations to all fac-
ulty members.
"We also give influenza immu-
nizations for a small fee to all
students and staff who want them.
Over 7800 flu shots were given
this fall," he noted.
Food Sanitation
The Environmental Health De-
partment which operates under
Health Service helps control san-
itation and gives instruction to all
food handlers in University din-
ing rooms.
The pharmacy has five full time
pharmacists who supply Health
Service with needed medical pre-
scriptions. The expense for drugs
is only 10 per cent above cost,
which is far less than a student
would pay elsewhere. It also is
equiped to manufacture its own
allergents for students using the
allergy clinic, Dr. Beckett said.
The laboratory has five gradu-
ate technicians who handle any
tests which need to be taken on
patients. The X-ray facilities are
staffed with radiologists who an-
alyze any X-rays that are taken.
Check Safety
The University Safety Commit-
tee, composed of sanitary engi-
neers and faculty members, works
through Health Service to check
any safety conditions on campus.
It investigates and tries to remedy
possible hazardous conditions, he
noted.
Commenting on the student at-
titude toward Health Service Dr.
Beckett said that "we try to com-
bat the poor attitude of some dis-
satisfied students who complain
about their treatment with good
medical care.
"Since professors have had their
checkups here, they have been
high in their praise of Health Ser-
vice. This has helped to cut down
some student's talk," Dr. Beckett
said.
Research Department
HealthrService has arranged
with a research department on
campus to make a survey among
students and find the places where
the complaints are real. "We will

SHOP at
FOLLETT'S
Photo Dept.
for
CAMERAS
PROJECTORS
DEVELOPING and
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
TAPE RECORDERS
and
TRANSISTOR RADIOS

"Members of the student's im-
mediate family may visit at any
time," Dr. Beckett added.
Seven years ago our space was

Ann Arbor Mayor Cecil 0. Creal
announced today that he plans to
seek a third term. The 62-year-old

adequate, but now there is a need I Republican is the first person
for extra space and conditions are thus far to announce his candi-
getting cramped, he noted. dacy for that office, in which he
"The quality of medicine Health has served since 1959.

I

i

l

.- I

While assisting the local high
school in an official capacity, he
is in a position to encourage stu-
dents from his home town to
attend the University.

Tc

IL

I

Wisi

day: Debate on USNSA
Moderated by Professor Lionel Laing-Political Science
hing to Withdraw: Wishing to Remain:
L MADDEN -PAUL POTTER
nn., Young Americans National Affairs
Freedom V.P., USNSA
EVE STOCKMEYER -ROBERT ROSS
sident, SGC Former Admin. V.P., SGC

S.o, x :.~ ."
.:+."." " { .:} J.: t^ +: : i> 4J -:
} t5
ih" t 'l - . . . .
Kgf ,
1tj . . 'S Cj1".j; : :"-SK :
are: T " :;::its"" t >4; ?:?2 ",.g.< o-f

Other b'eautiful 100% Nylon Tricot Quilted robes
in an array of colors and heavenly white too.
from 9.98
Mantailored coat and Pajama Set, 100% Nylon
Tricot with matching slippers. Sizes 34-36-38.
10.98

SLUMBR PARIYIASH IONS'
You'll be the most envied girl in the dormitory
or in your apartment dwelling when you wear this
luxurious robe of Borg's 100% orlon Acrylic Deep
pile-By Her Grace. Warm but lightweight and
washable. White and Maize, 17.98

Also Collarless, shift style in red and
8 to 18

4

Pajama set with slippers

5.98

To be the best "underdressed" girl on the cam-
pus, visit our lingerie dept. We have slips, bras,
girdles, garterbelts, briefs and petti-pants, too.

blue, sizes
12.98

11

I

-BIL
Chr
for
-STE
Pre

\ /

ZIN DELL
OLDSMOBILE

We suggest
this as an
deal gift

Open Monday
Eve. until 8:30
On Forest
off S.U.
around the corner
from Campus
Theatre

Complete body shop
service

Smart Santa's Layaway Now

Ann Arbor, NO 3-0507

o

Multi-Purpose Room, UGLI

Today, 2:00 P.M.

I

TI-.
.::
F t ~c-
I -X
.:

3
PINCH?


I

//
1

.Cl.
r,
s
r
r-

buy

your

1963

MICHIGANENS

:..-..r......z...-,.,r:.-.....-,..-.. r,.-..-., ,-.- .-..-nrx: j
l
y
J:"
r t
r
1}
K;.r
r
'rr
?r
:
'rv
>j
J
r"::
A
IAN
if
F
Tf
j
$Al
. ; }
§p
"'1
T
r:
ff
i*JC "

NOW!
NOW ONLY$500
" 16 PAGES OF COLOR
" FULL COVERAGE OF CAMPUS EVENTS
AND ATMOSPHERE

.. ... *_I "U.w f.wool.9

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan