100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,GE.SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDA'Y', NOVEMBER 9, 1962

GE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9,1962

-

I

FREE PIZZA
AT

CONVERTED FULLBACK:
Conley Ranked Best M' End
After Wisconsin Performance

Elliotts Shun Personal Battle

11

imbo'Fs

" V

I

Bimbo
pizza

is giving one FREE

(1.47 size)

to University

of Michigan
day. There i

stu-
is no

dents on their birth

delivery on free pizza. Free pizza must
be eaten at Bimbo's.
116 E. Washington NO 5-3231
EUROPE by CAR

By BOB ZWINCK
Who is Michigan's best end,
right now?
If you ask end Coach Jocko
Nelson, he says it's Jim Conley.-
And it is particularly satisfying
to note that Conley is only a
sophomore.
The end situation for the Maize
and Blue has really been a prob-
lem this season. Ineligibilities pre-
vented some from being on the
roster and now injuries to Capt.
Bob Brown and Bill Laskey have
further depleted the healthy end.
corps.
Gets Start
When Brown injured his ankle,
coach Bump Elliott named Conley
to the starting left end position
for the Wisconsin game and ap-
parently he will remain there for
at least tomorrow's encounter with
Illinois:
He is 6'3" tall and tips the scales
at 197 lbs. He hails from Sprig-
dale, Pa., where he played full-

back in high school. Conley was
captain in his senior year and
was named the team's most valu-
able player. He also reaped all-
state honors at the fullback .posi-
tion.
# Switched to End
But when he came to Michigan
he was switched over to end. What
does he think of the change? "Oh,
I like the left end position quite
a bit better now," he said.
The switch came when he was
out for freshman ball. But he
earned his frosh numerals and
became a bright end prospect dur-'
ing spring football.
Still Some Spark

By PETE DiLORENZI
The 1941 Bloomington, Illinois,t
High School team must have been
a powerhouse.1
At least it had a set of top-
notch halfbacks. These two prized,
groundgainers were the sons of
a former star gridder at Ohio
Wesleyan, coach there, and later,
line coach at Northwestern. Their
names: Bump and Pete Elliott.
To the Marines
After the '41 season, Bump went.
off and joined the Marines, who'
sent him to Purdue. Pete played
for two more years, and, then,
he, too, entered the service. In
his case, it was the Navy.
Pete spent a year at Park Col-
lege, in Parkville, Mo., and. was
then transfered here to Michigan
in 1945. A year later, Bump, now
out of the Army, chose Michigan,
too.
Came To Play
"I wanted to come here to
Michigan to play football. Pete's
already, being here probably did
influence my decision about com-
ing. It made it much more at-
tractive, having your brother here
on the same team," Bump recalls.
Both had spectacular careers
at Michigan. Bump was called by
H. O. (Fritz) Crisler, present
Athletic Director, but then head
football coach, "The greatest right
halfback I ever saw or coached."
In 1947, he made all-America, led
the Big Ten in scoring, was select-
ed Most Valuable Player in the
conference, and starred on Cris-
ler's Rose Bowl team, which de-
feated Southern California 49-0
in the Pasadena classic.

A

FINEST SERVICE *

GREATEST SAVINGS

SAVE UP TO 35%
All European Car Plans and Services.

Alfa
Fiat
Ghia

Healy
Jaguar
Lancia

-Mercedes Porsche

MGA
Renault

Triumph
Volkswagen

*Mercedes for Summer overseas delivery must be reserved NOW
...............m... ..-...m.-mm--..------ --------
Send for FREE illustrated folder on purchasing, renting, leasing
EUROPE BY CAR
c/o Stanley Natkins, Regional Representative
206 South Campus Ave., Oxford, Ohio
I'm Interested in
Nome
Address

,I

Rmsay Printers'
119 E. Liberty St.
(across from the P. Bell)'
WHAT A WELCOME
-. J
WHEN YOU GIVE
FINE LETTER PAPERS

Nevertheless, there is perhaps
still some. of that old fullback
spark left in him. But it now
shows up in a different way. It
comes out in his defensive play.
"I like to go out there and hit
them-you can really let yourself
go on defense. That's what I like."
Coach Nelson seems to like his
defensive work, too. "Conley is cer-
.S.- Cagers
Defeat USSR'
In Garden
NEW YORK (A) - The United
States earned a split with the
touring Russian national basket-
ball squads last night, defeating
the Soviet men's squad 70-66 in
the second game of a doublehead-
er at Madison Square Garden.
In the opener, the Russian
women edged the Nashville Busi-
ness College, women's AAU
champs, 59-57 in double overtime.
The American men's team won
its game from the free throw line
in the final 11 seconds. With the
score tied 66-all, Jerry Shipp sank
a pair of free throws. Then Gary
Thompson, former Iowa State all-
America, clinched the victory with
two more free throws with five
seconds left.
Open Tour
The, doubleheader opened the
Russians' eight-game tour of the
United States. They next play at
Maryland tomorrow night. The
games last night were played un-
der international rules.

JIM CONLEY
... sophomore starter
tainly our best defensive end at
this point," he volunteered.
In fact, he began the season as
a member of the Raiders. But now
that he is a starter, he must
show some offensive ability, too.
Elliott has claimed that he has
shown real progress in this area.
Not gifted with great speed nor a
glue-fingered pair of hands, Con-
ley has nevertheless caught as
many passes so far this season as
any of the other ends.
"Jim is working out very well
on the short pass patterns," Nel-
son observed. "He has developed
the knack of shaking himself free
across the middle. He also is adept
at cutting toward the sidelines
and getting partially away from
the defender."
Experience Helps
The experience he has picked
up even in the relatively short
period of playing time has served
him in good stead. He is putting
it to use and it is helping him
along toward further improve-
ment.
Conley has thus far snagged
five passes. They have accounted
for 47 uards and an average of 9.4
yards per catch. He was a fre-
quent target of Bob Timberlake's
jump passes against Minnesota.
Two of the catches came in that
game and he caught another pair
against Wisconsin.
Continued improvement is cer-
tainly hoped for by the coaching
staff, for he is only a sophomore.

I
q
li
t+
1
s
b
t
a
F
r
g
d
t
s
l
t
c
c
i
f
.1
t
i

'n 1948, he made all-American
uarterback.
Current Michigan Athletic Pub-
ic Relations Director Bennie Os-
erbaan, who assisted Crisler until
947, when he took over hinself,
ays that Bump and Pete were
oth excellent coaching prospects.
"In fact," says Oosterbaan, "I
ried to get both of them here at
ne time or other."
Never Any Rivalry
Oosterbaan adds that Bump and
Pete never developed any sort of
ivalry during their years to-
;ether on the Wolverines. "They
were both very friendly, very cor-
dial, and cooperated throughout
heir careers. There was never any
ort of rivalry between them."
Stay Close
"I suppose it is typical of a
ot of football players who want
o stay close to the game after
college to look to coaching as a
career," says Bump.
A year later, Pete took a coach-
ng position at the same school
Pete, too, feels that it a natural
feeling of a lot of football players
to want to stay near the game.
"Anybody who plays likes to
stay in touch with the game, and
the surest way is by coaching. I
was more attracted to Oregon
State because Bump was there
and we would have the opportun-
ty to learn together, but I wanted
to enter coaching before that
year," Pete says.
Remained as Coach
Pete remained at Oregon State
for two years as end coach. After
that he accepted an assistant
coaching position at Oklahoma
under Bud Wilkinson, remaining
there through the first two and
a half years of Wilkinson's 47-
game win streak, until the end of
the '55 season.
He became head coach at Ne-
braska forhone season and then
accepted the head coaching posi-
tion at California. His 1958 Bears
won the Pacific coast title and
earned a trip to the Rose Bowl.
Bump Remained
Meanwhile, Bump had remained
at Oregon State until 1952, when
he took a position under Forrest
Evashevski at Iowa. Bump came
to Michigan in 1957 and took over
for Bennie Oosterbaan in 1959

Pete took. over the reins at Illi-
nois a year later.
In their first encounter, Bump
prevailed by a tight 8-6 score. A
year later, Bump again came out
on top as his powerful Wolverines
trounced Pete's injury and drop-
out-ridden Illini, 37-6.
Team Basis
In spite of the fact that they
are brothers, they make every at-
tempt to put the annual meeting
on a team rather than a personal
basis.
As Pete says, "We see it as a
game between schools and teams
and not as a "battle of brothers."
Bump elaborates on the same
theme: "Basically, I try not to feel
any differently about this game
Pro Fiat Champs
The Draft Dodgers defeat-
ed Nu Sigma Nu 26-0 at
Wines Field last night for the
IM Professional Fraternity
championship.
from my feelings on any other we
play. Of course there will na-
tuarrly be more anxiety when you
play someone you know as closely
as Pete and I know each other,
but we try to keep it on a team
level; not a personal one.
"After all it is the ballplayers
on Michigan and ballplayers on
Illinois who will account for the
final score; not Fete or I."
N TCAA, AA U
To Hold Talks
NEW YORK () -- A meeting
will be held here shortly between
powerful groups contending for
control of amateur athletics in
the United States with expedta-
tions high that a truce will be
arranged.
At each other's throats are the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation and the Amateur Athletic
Union. Unless they can agree on a
peaceful settlement the United
States will field only a weak team
at the 1963 Pan American Games
in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and the 1964
Olympics in Tokyo.

l

12-Letterman
Pete, playing four

11

years

to

11

Bump's two, became the only 12-
letterman in modern Wolverine
history. He quarterbadked the
single-wing 1947 Rose Bowl team.

Teams Fight
For Bids

I

City,

-State

..........

Prepare now
for the cold days ahead.. .
by purchasing a pair of our Sheepskin lined §
shoes. Waterproof uppers with cushion soles;
Your worries about wet feet are over in a. pair
of these.§
BLACK OR TAN
§. $1895
Without the
sheep lining- §
$1695 §
§
\ §
Here's a shopping suggestion -§
§
Black or brown genuine indoor moccasin slipper §
with a shearling lining. Bear in mind that Bass
shoes are so far oversold that there will be no
shipments before the holidays.

I

r,

FREE LECTURE
ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
(Successful Living Found Through Christian Science"
MR. HERBERT E. RIEKE, C.S.B.
of Indianapolis, Indiana
member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church
The First Church of Christ, Scientists in Boston, Massachusetts
Sponsored by the
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
at the University of Michigan
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
'TONIGHT at 8
All Are Welcome

By JERRY DILLER]
Three quarters of this football
season are past.
A scan of the major collegiate
conferences at this point reveals
six tight races and the emergence
of the probable bowl candidates.
In our own Big Ten undefeated
Northwestern (4-0) is leading the
pack and favored to receive the
invitation to the Rose Bowl if not
tripped up in their final two con-
ference contests.
Wisconsin and Minnesota share
the second spot with a 3-1 record.
The Badgers will get a shot at
unceding the Wildcats this Satur-
day in the nation's hottest contest.
Dartmouth Leads
On the East Coast another un-
beaten team, Dartmouth, leads the
Ivy League with a 4-0 mark. The
Indians should have their hands.
full for the remainder of the
season meeting second place
Princeton and third place Colum-
bia in coming weeks.
At the other end of the country
Southern California has all but
clinched the Big Six title and
the Rose Bowl hid the goes along
with it by downing Washington
this past week 14-0.
Missouri, Oklahoma Tied
In the Big Eight it's been Mis-
souri and Oklahoma all the way,
each having an unblemished con-
ference record. Last week the
Tigers from Missouri removed Ne-
braska from the competitors ranks
and must do the same to the
Sooners to take the trip down to
Miami for the Orange Bowl.
Tight
Perhaps the hottest title 'race
in the country is being fought in
the Southeastern Conference be-
tween Alabama and Mississippi.
Each is undefeated, ranked in the
top four in the nation, and a
probable participant in either the
Cotton or Sugar Bowl on New
Year's Day.
It seems to be a three team race
in the Southern Conference with
Texas 3-0-1, Texas Christian, 3-1,
and Arkansas 3-1 each putting in
its claim. The Longhorns and the
Razorbacks claiming impressive
6-0 and 6-1 records are also high
on the list for participation in the
post-season classics.

A

THIS WEEK'S' GAMES
Consensus Picks in Caps {Consensus-92-48-.657)

GRI-SELECTIONS
Today is your last chance to enter this week's Grid Picks contest
and foretell the outcome of such difficult contests as Northwestern
vs. Wisconsin, Purdue vs. Michigan State, and Navy vs. Syracuse.
The winner will receive two free tickets to the Michigan Theatre now
showing "Gigot," starring Jackie Gleason, and a free subscription to
The Football News. The deadline is midnight tonight. One entry per
person please.
This week's guest selector is Michigan Daily Editor Mike Olinick.
The question of the week is: can he put his knowledge of journalism
to any use in picking these 20 top contests?

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Illinois at MICHIGAN (score)
Purdue at MICHIGAN STATE
Iowa at MINNESOTA
Indiana at OHIO STATE
NORTHWESTERN at Wise.
Pittsburgh at NOTRE DAME
CORNELL at Brown
HARVARD at Princeton
Texas Tech at BOSTON COLL.
Florida St. at GEORGIA TECH

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.:
18.
19.
24.

NAVY at Syracuse
West Virginia at PENN STATE
Miami at ALABAMA
Mississippi State at AUBURN
Maryland at DUKE
N.C. State at SO. CAROLINA
Nebraska at KANSAS
Texas A & M at SMU
Air Force at UCLA
SO. CALIFORNIA at Stanford

STAFF SELECTIONS
JIM BERGER (95-46-.679)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, Wis., Pitt., Cor., Har.,
BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Neb., SMU, UCLA, USC.
STAN KUKLA (91-49-.650)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, NU, Pitt, Cor., Har.,
BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, NCS, Kan., A&M, UCLA, USC.
JERRY KALISH (91-49-.650)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, NU, ND, Cor. Prin.,
BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Neb., A&M, UCLA, USC.
DAVE ANDREWS (Associate Sports Editor-90-50-.643)-Ill., Pur., Minn.,
OSU, NU, Pitt, Cor., Har., BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Miss. St., Duke, NCS,
Kan., A&M, AF. USC.
MIKE BLOCK (90-50-.643)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, NU, ND, Cor., Prin.,
BC, Ga. Tech, Syr., Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Kan., SMU, AF, USC.
BOB ZWINCK (90-50-.643)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, NU, ND, Cor., Prin.,
BC, Ga. Tech, Syr., Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Kan., SMU, UCLA, USC.
PETE DiLORENZI (89-51-.636)-Mich., MSU, Minn., OSU, NU, Pitt, Cor.,
Prin., TT, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Neb., SMU, UCLA, USC.
DAVE GOOD (89-51-.636)-11., MSU, Minn., OSU, Wis., ND, Cor., Har., TT,
Ga. Tech, Syr., Penn St., Ala., Miss. St., Duke, NCS, Neb., A&M, UCLA; USC.
TOM WEBBER (Sports Editor-87-53-.621)-Mich., Pur., Minn., OSU, NU,
ND, Cor., Har., BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC, Kan., SMU,
AF, USC.
JAN WINKELMAN (Associate Sports Editor-87-53-.621)-Mich., MSU, Minn.,
OSU, Wis., Pitt, Cor., Prin., BC, Ga. Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Md., NCS,
Neb., SMU, UCLA, USC.
MIKE OLINICK (Guest Selector, Daily Editor-80-60-.577)--Mich., Pur.,
Minn., OSU, NU, ND, Cor., Ear., TT, Tech, Navy, Penn St., Ala., Aub., Duke, SC,
Kan., SMU, UCLA, USC.

Al

IL

-----"

"""""""""""

III

----- - --- i l I

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan