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September 11, 1962 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MUSICAL COMEDY:
Musket To Produce Bartholomew Fair'

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1962
International Center Helps
Foreign Students,_Visitors

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By ARNOLD WEINGARDENT
Musket, an all-campus show
sponsored by the Michigan Union,
will present an original musical
comedy as the sixth production in
its series of annual presentations.
The Musket staff, headed by
general chairman Harry Taxin,
'64E,.will hold a mass meeting for
all students interested in any as-
pect of theatrical production at
7:15 p.m. Sunday in the Union
ballroom. At this time some musi-
cal numbers from this year's show
will be presented.
This year's production will be
"Bartholomew Fair" written by
Jack O'Brien, Grad, with mpsic
composed by Albert James, Grad.
The musical comedy is based on
Ben Jonson's last comedy of the
same name. "The presentation will
be largely experimental in nature,"
O'Brien said. "There have been
many expressions of interest from
New York producers."
O'Brien Directs
O'Brien will direct and James
will do the orchestration and con-
ducting of the play which will be
presented Nov. 29 through Dec. 2
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
After the Ann Arbor production
the cast will go on a road tour.
The length of the tour has not
yet been arranged. A cast record-
ing of the play will be made for
sale to the public and more at-
tention will be given to promotion
than in previous years, O'Brien
said.
Musket is an outgrowth of the
Michigan Union Opera which was
organized around the turn of the
century. The Union opera was
widely known throughout the
country as a result of its road
tours. The Opera presented all-

Musket was started immediately
after the opera's demise. The pro-
duction got its title from the de-
cision to let coeds take part in
the activity (Michigan Union
Show, Ko-Eds Too).
The f i r s t two productions
(Broadway musicals "Brigadoon"
and "Kiss Me Kate") were present-
ed at a local movie theatre. They
were plagued with the same prob-
lem that had closed the Opera-
expense.
The high operating expenses
were due to the fact that students
participated only in the acting of
the shows. Sets were professionally
designed and constructed and all
costumes were rented.
Student Run
To cut down costs the show was
moved to the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre and the entire production
crew was staffed and run by stu-
dents.
Three more Broadway musicals
were presented, "Oklahoma," "Car-
ousel," and "Kismet." Last year's
show was an original musical com-
edy, "Land Ho," written and com-
posed by O'Brien and James.
Over 200 persons are needed to
produce a Musket show. Jobs range
from acting and dancing to work
on orchestration, sets, makeup,
props, promotion, and programs.
Musket committees include: pub-
licity, programs, tickets, ushers,
and productions which is in, turn
subdivided into sets, costumes,
makeup, and props.
Interested students may sign up
for these committees following the
mass meeting. Auditioning for the
principle parts, singing and danc-
ing choruses, and orchestra will
also be held at this time.

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SURROUNDED-Four girls surround Jack O'Brien, Grad, in a
musical comedy of Musket, an all-campus show sponsored by the
Michigan .Union. O'Brien's "Bartholomew Fair," an experimental
production, will be this fall's presentation. It will play on campus

before going on a road tour.
male musicals which were general-
ly original parodies of campus life.
Its productions were extrava-
ganzas, costing as much as $20,000
to produce in the 1920's. Twice the
Union Opera played at the Metro-
politan Opera House in New York
and in 1925 the show was received
by President Calvin Coolidge at
the White House.
The depression, however, brought

an end to the grand scale shows
of the twenties and when World)
War II came all productions ceas-
ed until 1949. In that year the'
opera was revived and ran until
1955 when it finally closed down.
The reasons were varied. The
opera was criticized for being too
much of a vaudeville show, but
the primary reason was its great
operating expenses.

By BARBARA PASH
The International Center was
established by the University in
1933 as an agency to help foreign
students studying here in any pos-
sible way.
The great number of foreign
students is evidence of the diffi-
culty of this responsibility. There
are over 1800 foreigners from
about 100 different countries on
campus who are working in the
capacity of a regular student, Uni-
versity personnel, or students at
the English Language Institute.
A recent analysis of foreign stu-
dents reveals the'diversity of their
geographical backgrounds. Thirty-
one foreign students come from
Africa (other than North). Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and Oceania
have contributed 13 students; Eu-
rope, 205; the Near East and North
Africa, 211.
Area Distribution
Five hundred and forty-seven
students are from the Far East
and Southeast Asia and 164 from
Latin America and the Caribbean
Islands. Two hundred and forty
students are natives of North
American countries other than
Mexico.
Four major areas have been set
up within the Center to accomplish
their tasks. The area concerned
with coordinating all the various
activities of the International Cen-
ter is the Director's Office. James
M. Davies is the Director of the
Center.
"We deal, with all the inter-
cultural and international groups,
meet foreign visitors who come to
the University for a short time,
and help with programming," Mr.
Donald Van Liew, secretary to the
director noted.
Counseling Service
The second area of the Center's
activities is based on three coun-
selors. They do not engage in aca-
demic counseling since each for-
eign student is assigned an aca-
demic adviser in his field of spe-
cialization.
"Two of the counselors deal with
financial problems, visas and ex-
tensions of stay, housing difficul-
ties and personal problems," Van
Liew explained.
One of the counselors assist
American students organizations
regarding international programs
and advise nationality and area
clubs about their group acitivities.
Speaking Engagement
The Center arranges speaking
engagements for University for-
eign students in communities near-L
by which request international lec-
turers.
The foreign students are encour-
aged to take advantage of oppor-
tunities to inform others about
their national cultures. However,'
IC avoids conflicts withthe stu-
dent's scholastic demands.
The local programming of for-
eign leaders who visit the Univer-,

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sity for short periods of time is
one of the responsibilities of the
Center. Housing for the visitors is
arranged at the Madelon Pound
House, as specified by the Univer-
sity.
A fourth area of endeavor is
housing. Although the Center it-
self does not include housing fa-
cilities, it helps foreign students
to find living quarters and works
with Ann Arbor landlords who
want to offer housing to them.
"We also investigate the reasons
why some Won't rent to foreign
students," he said.
The Center Director serves as
Chairman of the University Com-
mittee on Foreign Student Schol-
arships. These scholarships, which
are awarded only to foreign stu-
dents, are granted on the basis
of need and academic record. This
year 65 scholarships were awarded,
Van Liew commented.
Freshman Scholarships
There are no general scholar-
ships available to foreig students
coming for the first time from
abroad. Loans, scholarships, and
grants-in-aid or employment are
not open to students who know
before they arrive that they will
need financial assistance.
Foreign students who obtain on-
campus employment must be
"cleared" by the Center. Repre-
senting the University, IC reports
periodically to the Immigration-
and Naturalization Service.
Liaison is maintained with the
Department of State, United States
Information Agency and the In-
ternational Cooperation Adminis-
tration. Transcripts and other re-
ports are sent to various foreign
governmental sponsors at their re-
quest.
Facilities Available
IC makes its staff and facilities
available to any of the 19 na-
tionality clubs and any other stu-
dent group at the University which
desires help.
The Center arranges programs
and tours during extended vaca-
tion periods in an attempt to
broaden the foreign students' un-
derstanding of American homes
and community life. A reception
for new students is sponsored by
IC each semester. Weekly teas and
otfier social events are sponsored
by the Center.
IC also keeps a central file of
information for American students
who want to study abroad. A for-
warding file of the home addresses
of University foreign students
is also maintained.
Aids Coordination
Through the counseling staff,
the Center assists the Interna-
tional Student Association in any
way requested, but especially in
program planning and coordina-
tion.
ISA is a voluntary membership
club for the international students
on campus. "We have over 500
members, and at least one-third
of them are Americans," Miss Har-
riet Cady, assistant counselor of
IC and adviser to ISA noted.
The Association provides a chan-
nel of activities for students from
all over'the world. In order to ac-
complish this, its activities are
divided into two spheres, hospi-
tality and tours.
Hospitality"
"Through the hospitality of
Americans, the foreign students
are given an opportunity to know
the United States better," she con- .
tinued.
This part of ISA's activities is
coordinated mainly with alumni
clubs throughout the country.
"Operation Friendship" takes place
each semester after the first week
of classes. The students spend a
weekend with the friends and
family of the Birmingham Alumni
Club, which sponsors this event.
There are hospitality plans for
each holidaynand vacation.
The second sphere, which the
Association encourages is that of
tours. During Christmas vacation
a tour of Washington, D.C. and
New York City is planned, lasting

for one week. The students'visit
four or five Michigan communities
every spring vacation. In June a
trip to Niagara Falls and Buffalo,
N.Y. is sponsored by the Buffalo
Alumni Club.
Short Tours
"We also have a series of short
tours which last for one or two
days. Those do a great deal in ac-
quainting the studentswith Ameri-
can customs and industries," Miss
Cady explained. ISA !tries to plan
these short tours during vacation
periods when the students can
take time from their studies.
"The Association operates
through a series of student com-
mittees," she continued. The cul-
tural committee schedules political
discussions, music-listening nights,
art shows and photography exhi-
bitions.
It also furthers foreign student-
faculty relations by sponsoring in-
formal coffee hours with various
professors at their homes.
Social Functions
The social committee is, con-
cerned with more definitive social
functions. Halloween and Christ-
mas parties, square dances and the
Monte Carlo Ball fall within their
realm.
The annual World's Fair is un-
der the joint sponsorship of the
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MUSICAL COMEDY--The inclusion of women students in the
plan for a Michigan Union Show resulted in a winning formula--
Musket. The annual productions have played to near sell out
crowds consistently. This year's presentation will be an original
musical.

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