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October 30, 1962 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FADE SEVEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

AT ANNUAL FALL MEETING:
NCAA Moves Against AAU

Michigan's

New

Of fense

Fails

NEW YORK (M)-The National
Collegiate Athletic Association has
recommended four new steps to
its full membership in its con-
tinuing struggle wth the Amateur
Athletic Union, Executive Director
Walter Byers disclosed last night.
The recommendations include:
1) Withdrawal by member col-
leges from AAU membership until
the AAU indicates a cooperative
attitude toward the new sports
federations created in the NCAA-
AAU war.
2) A boycott of entering college
athletes or teams in AAU compe-
tition unless the event is sanc-
tioned by the appropriate federa-
tion.,
3) Resignation of college per-'t
sonnel from AAU committees in
the sports in which federations
have been created - basketball,
gymnastics, and track and field.
4) That college facilities and
equipment be utilized to "the max-
imum to further federation activi-
ties."
Regarding the fourth item, By-
ers emphasized that the recom-
mendation carries the provision
that the AAU could continue to
"enjoy college facilities by either
joining the federation movement
or by entering into a sanction
agreement."
No Penalty
Byers conceded that there is
no legislation, on the NCAA books
that provides any penatly for a
college or an athlete ho chooses
to compete in an AAU event. He
said, however, that there is a pro-

posal concerning such matters be-
fore the NCAA policy-directingj
council, currently in session. Its
appeared that adoption of an
amendment aimed at stiffening;
the NCAA stand could come laterI
in the meeting. Such an amend-
ment would require approval by1
the NCAA membership at its an-3
nual convention in Los Angeles in;
January.;
It amounts to the latest step
in the AAU-NCAA hassle, nowI
more than 22 years old, over con-1
trol of amateur sports, particularly
involving international events such
as the Olympics. And it was made,
according to hte NCAA statement,
in the light of the refusal of the
AAU to recognize the federations
and threats by the AAU "to rule
ineligible any athlete who com-
petes in a federation event spon-
sored by a high school or college."
Hockey Restrictions Eased,
In action divorced from the fed-
erations yesterday, the Council
eased somewhat the restrictions
on certain Canadian amateur
hockey players wishing to enroll
and compete in hockey at United
States colleges; decided to drop
its two-year sponsorship of what
amounts to a national letter of
intent; and loosened its inter-
pretation on so-called develop-
mental clinics for prospective
athletes.
Byers said the decision to drop
sponsorship of the national letter
of intent ("more accurately, we
prefer to call it a pre-registration
service"), was made because the

Council realizes that certain seg-
ments of the NCAA membership
are opposed at this time.
Instead, the Council voted to
support a voluntary pre-registra-
tion program, assisting confer-
ences which have usch legisla-'
tion to work out reciprocal agree-
ments with other conferences over
signing of prospective student-
athletes. The national letter of
intent, which failed to achieve a
required two-thirds majority at
the last NCAA convention, would
provide that a student-athlete
who commits himself to a school
cannot change his mind and en-
roll elsewhere without NCAA
penalty.
Conference Legislation
Several conferences, including
the Atlantic Coast, Southeastern,
Southwest and Big Ten, have their
own legislation which provides for
a penalty if an athlete signs a
statement of intent to enroll at
one school and then switches to
another in the same conference.
The loosening of the interpreta-
tion on developmental clinics re-
sulted from the emergence of the
new sports federations and their
plans for such matters as develop-
ment of Olympic team prospects.
The new interpretation permits a
college to conduct clinics for pros-
pective athletes if they are ap-
proved by either the U.S. Olympic
Committee or the new federation.
Under the current rules, this
would fall under tryout regula-
tions and make the school subject
to penalty.

By MIKE BLOCK
The Wolverines of Michigan had
a new look Saturday, but they still
came up with the same old results.
Michigan, who has yet to score
a point in a Big Ten game
(although its opponents have
scored 82), unveiled a new three-
halfback formation in their out-
ing against Minnesota, but lost
anyway, 17-0.
The offensive innovations were
the product of secret practice ses-
sions held all last week by head
coach Bump Elliott. Instead of
using the old wing-T, with a

quarterback, a halfback, a full-
back and a flanker-back, Elliott
switched to a sort of parallelo-
gram formation, employing a
quarterback and three halfbacks
most of the time.
Rearranged
The essence of the new back-
field setup was to put Frosty
Evashevski at quarterback, with
Bob Timberlake, normally a sig-
nal caller, at left half, approxi-
mately where a close flanker-back
would go. Dave Raimey lined up
in his customary position at right
half, and either Tom Prichard or
Harvey Chapman became another
left halfback, at the regular deep
position, a yard or so to Raimey's
left.
The primary purpose of all this
was to have two passing threats,
Evashevski and Timberlake, in the
game at the same time. One of
the plays called upon most often
by Elliott was the halfback pass,
where Timberlake came around
behind Evashevski, received a
pitchout from him, and threw a
spot pass to the left end cutting
across parallel to the line of
scrimmage. Alternatively, Timber-

lake could carry the ball himself,
or not take the ball at all and go
out for a pass.
All for Naught
All this looked pretty good on
paper, but somehow it failed to
materialize in the game. This was
due to the failure of the Wolver-
ine line to keep such gentlemen
as Bobby Lee Bell and Carl Eller
out of the backfield, so that the
passers would have a second or two
to get rid of the ball. Although
Michigan did gain 96 yds. in the
air, the most in recent weeks,
there was a net loss of 46 yds.
on the ground, which was mainly
accounted for by passers being
tackled for huge setbacks.
So what about Wisconsin next
week? "We're undecided about
whether or not we'll go with the
same offense," said Elliott, "but
Timberlake is pretty sure to go
again at left half next Saturday.
We expect Wisconsin's defense to
be every bit as tough as Minne-
sota's, even though they may not
have two outstanding tackles like
Bell and Eller. Both Evashevski
and Chandler will probably see a
lot of action."

Elliott had some words of praise
for his defense. "We had a few
problems," he remarked, "but on
the whole, our tackling was the
best it's been all year. The de-
fense didn't give up, even to-
wards the end of the game."
On the now practically defunct
platoon system, Elliott comment-
ed, "We made an effort to use
platoons, but it just didn't work
out. Although we didn't use sep-
arate teams Saturday, we did use
about the same number of players

as when we were on platoons.
In the injury department, there
was a rash of bad ankles in Sat-
urday's contest, the most import-
ant of which was captain Bob
Brown's. Brown left the game with
only half of the first quarter gone,
and is a doubtful starter against
Wisconsin. Guard Dick Szyman-
ski and Ron Kocan also came up
with injured ankles, but aren't in
such bad shape. Tackle Joe O'Don-
nell, who couldn't punt Saturday
because of his bad ankle, is now
completely recovered.

U

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

An Agency Representative will interview undergraduate Seniors and
graduate students for June and August 1963 employment by our
Agency during the dotes of November 6th through the 9th, 1962, on
Campus. Please consult the Bureau of Appointments and Occupational
Information, 3200 Student Activities Building for information con-
cerning the types of positions available and to schedule an appoint-
ment. A review of the information on file with the Bureau of Appoint-
ments is an essential requisite prior to scheduling an appointment for
interview.

U

FROSTY EVASHEVSKI
.. first string quarterback

Michigan Boasts

Mermaid Champ

By BILL BULLARD
"Will the real Marty Sinn please
stand up," moderator Bud Collier
will say on the game-show "To
Tell the Truth" this afternoon.
The three women contestants
will look at each other for a brief
moment. Then the 19-year old
blonde beauty from Ann Arbor will
stand and reveal herself as Marty
Sinn, the world's professional
women's swimming champion.
Only one of the panelists had
guessed the identity of Miss Sinn
through the process of question-
ing the three contestants who were
each trying to convince the pan-
el that they were Marty Sinn. The
show was taped last Tuesday in
New York and will be shown on
national television at 3:30 p.m. to-
day on CBS.
Fifteen Miles
Miss Sinn won her title by being
the first woman to finish the 15-
mile World Championship Swim
in Lake Ontario at the Canadian
National Exposition last August 17.
Only, nine of the- 38 entries finish-
ed the race.
The sophomore art student in
the College of Architecture and
Design, plans to use her $2,300
prize money to go to Mexico or
Italy next smeester to continue her
studies. She hopes to go back and
defend her crown next summer
and then study in Canada for a
year.
Four Hours a Day
Nine weeks before the Lake On-
tario swim, Miss Sinn was prac-
ticing four hours a day at a Cana-
dian girls' camp run by her coach,
Mrs. Rose Marie Dawson. Mrs.
Dawson, the daughter of the late
Michigan ' swimming coach, Matt
Mann, coaches the Michigan Wom-
en's Swimming Team and the Ann
Arbor Swim Club.
Besides practicing for the 15-
mile swim, Miss Sinn was a coun-
selor for the younger girls and
taught swimming, diving, dramat-
ics, and art. She considers camp
an idea situation for her. "My
coach is at camp," she said." "Most
of the swimmers go up there with
her. Not only do we have time to
train but we get paid for counsel-
ing."
Coach Dawson first started
working with Miss Sinn eight years
ago. Since then she has placed in
the state AAU meet in the individ-
ual medley, backstroke, butterfly,
and various freestyle distances. At
one time she held state records for
four freestyle distances including
the mile.
Longer Distances Better
"I don't think these distances
were long enough for her," com-
mented Buck Dawson, husband of
Miss Sinn's coach and business
manager of the Michigan and Ann
Arbor women's swim teams. He
pointed put that the longer the

distance that Marty swims the bet-
ter she does.
"I've never been able to sprint
fast," admitted Miss Sinn. "My
times have not been comparable to
the best national and international
times." So with the agreement of
Mr. and Mrs. Dawson, she decided
to try professional marathon
swimming to finance her college
education.
Her immediate goal. was win-
ning enough money to study
abroad in the second semester of

her sophomore year. First, she
entered a small regatta and won
$25 in a one mile race to finance
a trip to Toronto for the big race.
In the World Championship
Swim, Miss Sinn was third among
the 38 swimmers until the ninth
mile when she began to fade bad-
ly. She hadn't eaten anything
since starting the race which was
about five hours old at that time.
So she was fed some maple syrup
from a cup nailed to the end of a
canoe paddle that all her friends
at camp had autographed. Later
she was fed hot boullion and some
more syrup.
Too Late'
But before the nourishment had
time to take effect, Miss Sinn was
passed up by two men swimmers.
She held fifth place at the end of
the meet but was almost passed by
another contestant at the end of
the fourteenth mile when she
thought that she had finished the
fifteen mile course. After starting
up again, she eventually finished
only 35 seconds behind the two
men who. passed her up and who
tied for third place.
"It wasn't too exhausting," said
Miss Sinn, "I swam hard all sum-
mer. I was used to it." During the
summer she had not attempted
to keep her weight down as usual
but ate plenty of ice cream. The
added weight was supposed to pro-
vide protection from the cold
water. But this as it turned out
was not necessary. "The water was
warm," she said, referring to the
68 degree water of Lake Ontario.
What most surprised Miss Sinn
about the race was that her moth-

er unexpectedly drove to Toronto
from Ann Arbor to see her swim.
"I was very surprised," she said.
"My mother told me that she
wasn't doming." So it was quite a
shock when she heard her mother
call to her from a newspaper boat
at the seventh mile.
According to Buck Dawson, "If
she wants to she could be a mara-
thon swimmer for another ten
years. But she's not interested in
professional swimming as such."
Miss Sinn confirmed this by indi-
cating that she was only planning
to swim in the 15-mile race again
next summer and would then de-
cide about her future swimming
plans.

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