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September 11, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDA

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTJESDA

HELSINKI CONSENSUS:
Festival Spreads Goodwill, Fails Reds

U Cautiously Prepares
For Full-Year Operation
(Continued from Page 1)

By HELENE SCHIFF
As the 14,500 youths from 144
countries left the Communist-
sponsored eighth world youth fes-
tival in Helsinki Aug. 5, the gen-
eral consensus was that the festi-
val was successful at furthering
international goodwill but failed
at furthering international Com-
munism.
Although it was reported that
75 per cent of all the festival ac-
tivities were nonpolitical, there
were demonstrations since the
opening d a y. Anti-Communist
youths shouted anti-Soviet slo-

gans at various festival events in-
cluding parades, sports events,
concerts, movies and dances and
the Helsinki police arrested at
least 80 demonstrators.
Also, the festival proved to be
an escape hatch for East European
youths fed up with Communism.
Reportedly 20 East Germans have
defected since the opening of the.
festival. In addition, several Poles
have deserted their delegation.
One of the most crucial moves
that occurred at the festival was
the walkout of 44 non-Commun-
ists of the 101 member Ceylonese

delegation. Headed by the delega-
tion's official leader, Hema Da-
bare, they left in protest against
the procedure at political meet-
ings, where Communist speakers
were favored.
For the past 15 years the festi-
vals have been held in Communist
capitals-Prague, Budapest, East
Berlin, Bucharest, Warsaw, Mos-
cow. The most recent festival in
Vienna, Austria, in 1959 was the
first one to be held in a non-Com-
munist country. The Finnish gov-
ernment, this year's host, was op-
posed to having the festival in
its country.

ally concluded that the funds
come from outside sources.
The United States was repre-
sented by a 450 member delega-
tion. In addition several ariti-fes-
tival groups such as the Yale Uni-
versity Russian chorus and the
Independent Research Service
(IRS) sent representatives. IRS
tried to counter Communist prop-
aganda by establishing personal
contacts and fight private oral
battles with Communist propagan-
ists. Among this group were five
University students - Michael
Zweig, '64; Brian Glick, '62; Rob-
ert Ross, '63; Barbara Feldkamp,
'62; John Feldkamp, '64L; and
Prof. E. Harold Swayze of the
political science department.
About one-fourth of the Unit-
ed States contingent went on a
13-day tour of the Soviet Union
after the Festival ended.

The commission reviewed rather
carefully the studies and recom-
mendations which had been made
by earlier faculty groups. It also
conducted research of its own into
future (potential) student enroll-
ments, and the ability of the Uni-
versity to meet these if its growth
was on a year-to-year basis.
"It was the conclusion of the
commission after this preliminary
research that some form of year-
round operation would be a nec-
essity, and we proceeded to take
a look at different plans for im-
plementing year-round activities,"
Prof. Haber said.
Initial faculty reaction to the
possible conversion to year-round
operations was tested at an in-
formal meeting of the University
Senate in April.

To Begin Construction
Of Music School Home

n

--
;
r
x
,
a
T,
y
n
i
'I.
Rat

e n d the over-crowding a n d
around - the - clock practice ses-
sions which have plagued the
school in recent years.
Saarinen's sprawling, cleanly-
designed structure, to be carved
out of a heavily-wooded slope
overlooking the Huron River, will
c o n t a i n two concert-rehearsal
halls (about the size of Aud. A),
55 teaching studios, 50 classrooms,
189 practice rooms, faculty offices
and a 30,000 volume library-all
representing a considerable in-
crease In facilities available.
The building- is totally sound-
proof, and much care will be taken
to insure proper acoustics.
Drop Halls
Originally, a large auditorium
and concert hall (to supplant Hill
Aud.) was included in the struc-
ture, but was left out when it
was found the cost would zoom up
to $8 million.
Assistant Dean Allen P. Britton
of the music school said the new
facility could allow for some ex-
pansion in the school's enrollment,
if necessary additional funds be-
come available.
Dean James B. Wallace praised
the new construction as evidence
that the University is as vitally
interested in the humanities as in
other phases of academic life.
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