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October 26, 1962 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AiCHI.R. R/A--Y

'EMOTIONA LIST:'
Meacham Discusses Career

0---

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
Anne Meacham, an actress
typed by Broadway theatre-goers I
as "a high-powered emotionalist,"
has been playing ingenue roles
since she joined the Association
of Producing Artists.
Arriving breatheless from the
doctor, who told her that her
voice was so low that she should:
play ."either Camille 'or Sadie
Thompson," Miss Meacham dis-
cussed the highlights of her the-.
atre career.
In David Ross' off-Broadway
production of Henrik Ibsen's!
"Hedda Gabler," in which she:
played the title role, Miss Mea-x
cham had two days to prepare
for the strenuous role. She was
called at 2 a.m. Sunday, after she
herself had returned from the
performance, by- the producer
whose leading lady, Mai Zetterling,,
had just collapsed. ANNE MEACHAM
Decides to Gamble . . . to play ingenue
"We, decided to gamble," Miss
Meacham said, - and she received mission on the night of the per-
the script at 2:30 a.m. For the formance, while the audience
next two days she kept a gruel- waited for 40 minutes, the cast
ling work schedule to be able went through the lines together
to go on in the third and final for the first time without Miss
preview Tuesday. Meacham using a script.
The cast had never gone "To play Hedda I had to rely
through the fourth act of the on instinct and intuition. I didn't
play and during the second inter- have a chance to indulge any kind

NOW

DIAL
8-6416

of self-consciousness or ove-ex-
tended analysis so I just relaxed
and tried to do what was there,"
she recalled.
Sense of Humor
Miss Meacham also played
Cathy, the role created by Eliza-
beth Taylor on the screen, in
Tennessee Williams' "Suddenly
Last Summer" in an off-Broadway
production of the play.
Commenting on the controver-
sial playwright, she termed him
a "brilliant man with an exqui-
site, almost diabolical, sense of
humor" which is not nasty but
"just always to the point and
fantasticly ironic."
Discussing the future of APA
and repertory groups like it scat-
tered over the country, Miss Mea-
cham said she agrees with all
the things said before about it-
that it was "the hope of the
theatre"-but also cited certain
dangers she sees.
'Insulated, Commonplace'
"It is a danger that groups of
this type will become insulated
and commonplace and will take
fewer chances in choosing plays
and productions.
"The residence company must
be sure it finds standards that are
the best for itself, rather than for
Broadway, and must let nothing
dissipate the emphasis it should
show for vitality in the produc-
tion," she said.
Not Just Replacements
A difficulty she sees with the
APA is that although the company
as a whole has done most of the
plays it is presenting before, the
new actors -with the group, such
as Miss Meacham herself, are
"not just replacements but will
make the same play a whole new
production."
Before she joined the company,
Miss Meacham saw "The Schoo
for Scandal" played in New York
and noticed that "al the charac-
ters were acting as the director
believed they should.
"No individual was lost and
there was no pettiness oi stage
and no silly little egos.
False Labels
While she admires APA artistic
director Ellis Rabb greatly, Miss
Meacham believes "you can never
tell where you'll find a good direc-
tor. The trouble with some Broad-
way directors is that their labels
don't tell you what the real pro-
duct is and it doesn't make a
director good just because he's
been on Broadway or to the Actor's
Studio."
She cited as two of her best
directors a teacher she worked
under while at New Trier High
School-in Winnetka, Ill., and Rob-
ert Leaker, a director she worked
under in Flint.
Miss Meachamn will be Jii the
APA's final production, John
Whiting's "A Penny for a Song,"
starting next Wednesday, . which
she describes as "to me, a char-
ade, which is funny and can be
touching. t can make you think
for a second but won't let you
think too long."
erMastery . .. Magic
.. Sheer Music!"
-Detroit News
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM
Proudly Presents

" " 'r"A PERFECTLY
SPLENDID
,COMEDY"
-N.Y. HER. TRIS

.FAMES ROERTSON
JUSTICE
PHILU . *BAXTER
AUI~ON films Relemj

"HILARIOUS TRIUMPH !"
WORLD-TEL & SUN

U Installs
Laboratory
For Dorm
In a novel experiment, the Uni-
versity is installing a language
laboratory in East Quadrangle this
week to help students living there
with their foreign language home-
work.
This is the first time such a set-
up has been established in a resi-
dence hall in any university.
The lab will contain 10 booths
which will have full access to all
language programs playing in the
central language lab in Mason
Hall.
Its operation is dependent on
a device called the "dial selector,"
through which a student using the
main lab puts on earphones and
selects his lesson by simply dialing
a number in his booth.
By using the same means, a stu-
dent in East Quad gets his pro-
gram from the central lab in much
the same manner as placing a
long-distance call
Each of the 10 booths will be
operational by December. Until
then the lab will receive a limited
number of language programs.
If successful, this experiment in
putting a greater emphasis on
academics within the residence
hall, may open a new avenue in
the field of language lab opera-
tion, Erwin Hamson, developer of
the experiment and acting director
of the language lab said recently.
Not only will the labs be oper-
ating closer to dormitory dwellers,
but, more important, these rela-
tively inexpensive auxiliary labs
are one practical solution to the
increasing number of students in
need of the laboratory.
Delta Granted
Accreditation
The state commission on Col-
lege Accreditation granted accred-
itation to Delta College as a two-
year institution at its last meet-
ing on Oct. 18.
The effect of this recognition
will assure the transfer of Delta
College credits to other colleges
and universities in the state. The
recognition is for a two-year per-
iod ending June 30, 1964.
The recognition by the commis-
sion is only "the first step on a
long road" to further accredita-
tions for the college, according to
Samuel D. Marble, president of
Delta College.
Voice Places
On Issues' M
By BARBARA LAZARUS
"Voice Political Party repre-
sents a fresh view of radical pol-
itics which emphasizes the moral
approach to political and social
issues," Ralph Kaplan '63, member
of Voice Executive Committee and
chairman of Voice Committee on
the University, said yesterday.
Speaking to the President's
Council of Panhellenic Association.
Kaplan said that these moral con-
cerns include issues such as civil
liberties, disarmament and mi-
grant workers.
"Voice represents an articulate
minority which tries to inject con-
troversy and radical ideas both on
national and University issues into
a politically apathetic campus
community."
See Radical Ideas
It broadens students' perspec-
tive to see radical ideas intro-

duced by their fellow students,
Kaplan claimed.
"Voice is concerned with Stu-
dent Government Council's lack
of direction or power. On the Uni-
versity level this means that SGC
has played a very minor role in
contributing to University policy
decisions."
There are tvco acceptable ways
out of SGC's lack of power within
the University. One way is to have
SGC have direct control of student
rules, and this path was rejected
by SGC last year. The alternative
way is for students to become
part of a student-faculty govern-
ment, he noted.
Forum for Students
In discussing the National Stu-
dent Association, Kaplan said that
"it provides a forum for students
and student leaders to discuss na-
tional and international issues as

Regionalization of Hospitals
Exists in Concept,_Not Fact
By GERALD STORCH
tempts are made to implement the
While an attempt at regionaliz- concept," McNerney and Riedel
ing hospital operations fell short wrote.
of expectations after a 10-year Citing parallels in library and
experiment in northern Michigan, rural-school fields, they contend
the concept itself "if undertaken that the formal efforts can work
with understanding" could be given an early involvement of
translated into effective action, a key community leaders and phy-
recent University publication de- sicians, a flexible plan of coordin-
clares. ation to absorb local improvisation
"Regionalization and R u r a I and inspired personal negotiation.
Health Care," by Walter J. Mc- If regionalization is proven to
Nerney, formerly the director of induce higher quality hea'th care,
the Bureau of Hospital Adminis- and voluntary associations and co-
tration, and Donald C. Riedel, a ordination for this does not come
1 study director for the bureau, an- about, then "area-wide planning
alyzes the successes and failures agencies with joint government-
of the plan and its implications voluntary representation and fi-
for future regionalization efforts. nancing should be implemented,"
While this concept exists to a the book states.
great extent informally, the formal "The trick is to guide existing
structure-in its fullest expression patterns, not bludgeon them."
consisting of a medical school
teaching center at the base, a less To
complex regional hospital, com-
munity hospitals, and relations be-
tween these three levels and otherUS N v D
public health agencies and doctors'
offices-exists "largely on paper."
Objective for Personnel The University will celebrate
It is still an objective for many Navy Day today.
medical personnel, however, as a Navy Day, which actually is to-
means of better distributing and morrow, pays tribute to the many
sharing limited facilities, special- heroes of the land, sea, and air
ized skills and rising costs. who have helped keep the Navy
For attitudinal, economic, and ready and responsive in time of
administrative factors, the region- war and peace.
alization scheme embodying Kal- Mr. Percival Price, University
kaska, Inaway, St. Ignace. Petos- carillonneur, will give the Navy
key ;and Traverse City was a fail- Day Carillon Concert,
ure, the authors continued.
Lack of awareness among the
physicians and the communities
and strong psychological attitudes UNIVERSITY
supporting autonomy of each
health unit weakened the ties with
the regional hospital.
Lack of Standards
Eeconomically, the lack of qual-
itative standards by which to ap-
ply the need for distribution of
medical services and the depressed
economic level in the area, were
another drawback. T he
Inadequate administrative han-
dling of the organizational rela-
tionships, due to insufficient ex-
perience and staff numbers, con-
stituted the third major handicap.
Although the formal structure
virtually dissolved, the regional af-
filiation did leave behind several
benefits, including a stabilized Tues.,
physician supply, a broader selec-
tion of facilties and better chan- 8:00 P.M.,
nelling of referral cases.8:0P .1
Will Exist Informally
These benefits help to demon- Prices
strate a certainty: "Regionaliza-
tion will continue to exist inform- Box Office o
ally whether or not formal at- Individu
sEmphasis
[oral Aspect "BEST P
well as educational concerns vital
to all universities.
"It is SGC's fault that it has
not presented NSA to students on
campus. It should be SGC's func- "THE MOST ADV
tion to present NSA's value to the
University community," Kaplan
said. "ONE OF THE M
Reflect Student Interest HAS MADE. IT L
Programs and demonstrations "'WEST SIDE STO
have shown the degrees of student
interest on these issues. SGC EMA MASTERPIE4
should be responsive to such in- FORMANCES AR
terests and discuss these issues - Bosley Crow
more than they presently do, Kap- "AN ALL-STAR BL
lan added. - Justin Gilbert,
"Voice has been involved with "A SUPERB ACCOM
other movements and organiza- SO TRIUMPHANT
tions which have had much more STUNNED BY IT
important effect than most SGC -
projects.".Sa
'U' Fencing Club

To Meet Weekly NOW
The intramural fencing pro-
gram, in cooperation with the Ann,
Arbor Fencers Club, sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Recreation Depart-
ment, will continue its activities
in the boxing room, I-M Bldg., DIAL 2-6264
7:30-10 p.m. every Friday evening.

PLAYERS-DEPT. OF SPEECH PRESENT
Carl oloni's
Ca hilarious force
ERVANT of
OcVO MASTERS
Oct. 30 and Thurs.-Sat., Nov. 1-3
TRUEBLOOD AUD., FRIEZE BLDG.
$1.50-$1.00;1 Fri.-Sat. $1.75-$1.25
pen for season tickets today 12:30-5:00
il tickets on sale Mon. 12:30-5:00

I
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I
1
t

STANDING ROOM
HILL AUDITORIUM-OCT. 27-8:30
TICKETS $1.00
-at Homecoming Office, Oct. 26, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
-at Hill Aud., Oct. 27, 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1962

BOB NEWHART

'2"
ti"

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STARTING TODAY

She was so'BOSTON
inpUJC... ad. so
IFENCh in -P--RVA... -u &
when Ysheod
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U-N-W-,

TI~n 1"l Winner of 10
U 1Uf~ aAcademy Awards!
IClTURE OF THE YEAR"
kNEW YORK FILM CRITICS' AWARD
ENTUROUS MUSICAL FILM EVER MADE!"
- Life Magazine
lOST EXCITING PICTURES HOLLYWOOD
LITERALLY EXPLODES ON THE SCREEN I"
- Redbook
RY' IS A CIN- "GREATEST PICTURE OF THE
CEI THE PER- YEARI" - Harrison Carroll.
E TERRIFIC!" LosAngeles Herald&Express
ther,NewYork Times "NOTHING SHORT OF SPEC-
gCKBUSTERI" TACULARI DOWNRIGHT
New York Daily Mirror ELECTRIFYING!"
IPLISHMENT! - Sandra Sanders, Philadelphia Daily News
THAT ONE IS "ONE OF THE MOST SENSA-
S SUCCESSI" TIONAL, EXCITING FILMS OF
Paine Knickerbocker, THIS OR ANY OTHER YEAR["
in Francisco Chronicle - James O'Neill, Jr., Washington Daily News

1
r

LH-LlllU
1100 I

POLICY
Mon. thru Thurs. 2 & 8 P.M.
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
at 2:00-6:45-9:25 P.M.
Week Day Matinee 90c
Nights and Sunday $1.25

. i
i

SEE SANDA
leanLous
si dazzlin
_m IE~ VEE S p oNt'1LND lf 'am
"C~lr- M RMER0 " S1iFANI[ POWERS > etthe
t reeplayby RICHARD MORRIS - Directed by HENRY .EVIN
oduced by ROSS HUNTER-" A Universal-lnternational Picture I I

HILL AUD.- NOV. 8
MAIL ORDERS FILLED NOW
Send to: Professional Theatre
Program, Mendelssohn Theatre
Please enclose a stamped
self-'addressed envelope.
Orch. $4.50, 4.00, 3.50
1st Bolc. $3.50, 3.00, 2.50
2nd Ba-c. $2.50, 2.00, 1.50
Box Office Opens Nov. 5

I

hethic2mcet
announces
100 subscriptions aailable for its Fall series

i

-% l .. !7. . 'p... '{of.. ' } 5 , , { °?a . . f

S.oG. C. Cinema quild
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00 Saturday and Sunday at 7:00 and 9:00
UGETSU THE COURT JESTER
AA:-L 1,- V .- A - -,..,: A -.,: :(::i D f?-, V ,n ew,,-% "

PERSONAL CINEM
A series of films illustrating the concept of the motion picture
as the expression of the artist's personal vision.
October 29
F. W. MURNAU'S
NOSFERATU
A poetic evocation of the supernatural by the creator of THE
LAST LAUGH and SUNRISE. In a recent poll of French film
critics, Murnau was selected as the greatest director in the
history of the cinema,
November 191

December 10
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
BROKEN BLOSSOMS
Certainly the most personal, and perhaps the greatest, of the
films by the creator of BIRTH OF A NATION and INTOLER-
ANCE. Starring Lillian Gish.
January 14
JEAN COCTEAU'S
LES PARENTS TERRIBLES
Tangled family relationships examined with overwhelming in-
tensity by one of the most individual of all film makers.

II

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