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October 18, 1962 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-18

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1"Y; CICTQBER Y8, I962

THE MICHIGAN IIAILY

PAGE TREE

LY. OCTOBER 18, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

US.,

Germans Reach Accord

ECUMENICAL COUNCIL:
Catholics Engage in Struggle

*

*

*

*

*

*

Report

Saud Asks

**Faisal

r
.

To Establish New Cabinet

BOUNDARY DISPUTE:
Red China Warns India
On Flights at Bo rder'
TOKYO ( P - Red China notified India yesterday that Chinese
forces along the disputed Tibetan-Indian frontier henceforth intend to
force down or shoot down any alien plane that enters their air space.
It suggested in a note delivered to the Indian embassy in Peiping
that India down any aerial intruders on its side.
Answering Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's recent denial of
what the New China News Agency called "the fact that Indian aircraft
-'air space," the note said:
I IWhose Planes?

National
Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Speaker of the
House John McCormack yesterday
accused the Republicans of hav-
ing helped Fidel Castro take over
cJuba. The Massachusetts Demo-
.rat said "the evidencen.clearly
shows that Castro could not have
got into power without the direct
or indirect aid of our government
during the Eisenhower adminis-
tration."
* * ,:
MANCHESTER - Republican
Gov. Wesley Powell, two term chief
executive of New 'Hampshire, last
night sharply attacked the state
GOP and endorsed John W. King,
Democratic candidate for gover-
nor.
S* *
WASHINGTON -The United.
States is trying to interest France
in buying a nuclear submarine to
cut down the United States foreign
trade deficit, according to the lat-
estdversion of a reported possible
deal. * * *
NEW YORK-The biggest trad-
ing day in nearly three weeks
brought a sharp decline in the
stock market yesterday, as 3.24
million shares were traded. Dow-
Jones reported 30 industrials down
1.67, 20 railroads down 0.63, 15
utilities down 0.29.

Let's down them and find out
whose aircraft after all are mak-
ing frequent illegal flights above
the border."
The Chinese will act on their
own, it said, "in order to make the
truth known to the whole world."
The note charged there were 431
Indian "air intrusions into China"
in the six months from April
through September, adding that
Chinese aircraft never entered In-
dian air space..
Strict Instructions
The New Delhi government re-
sponded to a past protest by say-
ing that "all Indian aircraft have
strict 'instructions to keep within
the international frontiers of
India."
Minor shooting broke out again+
Tuesday in the contested region;
between South-Central Tibet and
Northeast Tibet.
There was an exchange of shots
between one Indian post and Chi-
nese Communist intruders in the
area south of Thagla Ridge, which
India regards as the border, a New
Delhi spokesman said. He reported
the Chinese threw a grenade at
another Indian post, but there
were no casualties.
Bolivia Demands
Funds for Sales
LA PAZ, (J)-Bolivia will ask
the United States for $14 million
as compensation for the sale of
United States strategic reserves of
tin in the world market, Minister
of Mines and Petroleum Simon
Cuentas said yesterday in a news
conference.

KING IBN SAUD
... cabinet shuffleE
UAR SEAT :
Morocco W ins
.New Position
I n UN council
UNITED NATIONS (if') -The
General Assembly yesterday elect-
ed Morocco to a seat on the UN;
Security Council over Nigeria and
thus turned back a bid by black
African nations to kill the 1946
"geritleman's agreement" on allo-
Cation of seats.
The decisive vote on the second
ballot was 73 to 36-one more than
the required two-thirds majority.'
Morocco was elected to succeed
the United Arab Republic, thus up-
holding the tradition that a Middle
East country should retain the
council seat at issue.
On the first ballot Morocco won
57 and Nigeria 30 votes with sev-
eral other countries receiving scat-
tered support. Under Assembly
rules the second ballot was re-
stricted to the two main contend-
ers.
Three Elected
No difficulty was encountered
in the election of Norway, Brazil
and the Philippines as other non-
permanent members of the 11-na-
tion council, the UN's highest poli-
tical organ. All were by secret bal-
lot.
Norway was chosen to succeed
Ireland and Brazil to succeed Chile
for two-year terms. The Philip-
pines was elected for a one-year
term to succeed Romania under
an agreement reached last year to
split the normal two-year term.
Neither was able to muster the re-
quired two-thirds majority in the
balloting last December.
Permanent seats on the council
are held by the United States, Brit-
ain, France, the Soviet Union and
Nationalist China.
Allot Seats
Under terms of the gentleman's
agreement reached in London two
of the non-permanent seats were
alotted to Latin America, and one
each to Eastern Europe, Western
Europe, the Middle East and the
British Commonwealth.
At that time UN membership was
51 compared with 109 at present.
Foreign Minister Jaja Wachuku
of Nigeria waged his campaign on
a kill-the-agreement platform. He
argued that the African nations!
who make up the bulk of the newly
admitted members are entitled toj
an African seat.'

To Enforce
Saudi StandE
By Changes
King's Move .Relatesa
To Crisis in Yemen '
DAMASCUS (AP)-King Saud ofE
Saudi Arabia yesterday asked For-
ign Minister Prince Faisal, his
brother and heir, to form a new
government, Mecca Radio report-
ed.
The abrupt move apparently was
related to recurrent crises de-1
veloping over neighboring Yemen
where renewed fighting was re-
ported and the deposed king form-
ed a provisional royalist regime.
Saud, a partisan of the de-
throned royalists of Yemen, dis-..
solved his cabinet in the country's
general interest, the Saudi Arabian
radio said. No other reason was
given.
Heads Delegation
Faisal was in New York as chief
of the Saudi delegation at the
United Nations. The delegation
declined to comment on the radio
report.
Meanwhile, the United Arab Re-
public's Cairo Radio claimed that
a new attempt by a Saudi Arabian
force to penetrate Yemen's north
was repulsed by the ruling Yemeni
revolutionaries.
Saud's dismissal of the cabinet,
appeared to be aimed at setting
up a stronger administration to
face the challenge posed by the
support given Yemen by President
Gamal Abdul Nasser of the United
Arab Republic.
Counter-Offensive
There were mounting expecta-
tions that Yemeni royalists were
poised for a new counter-offensive,
with a Mecca Radio report that
dethroned King Mohammed Al-
Badr formed the provisional gov-
ernment.
Heading the six-man govern-
ment is prince Saif Al Islam Al
Hassan, Badh's uncle who was
chief Yemeni delegate to the
United Nations. He rushed back to
his country after Badr was re-
ported slain last month in the
revolution.
Not Secure
The 21-day-old Yemeni repub-
lican regime at San'a, the capital,
apparently was not secure, as had
been claimed earlier by Premier
Abdullah Salla; the revolution-
aries now acknowledge that fresh
fighting had broken out along
Yemen's northern border.
Badr was reported to have set
up headquarters in the Haja re-
gion, about 70 miles northwest of
San'a.
Badr was reported to have ad-
vised all Arab kings and heads of
state that he still was the Imam
of Yemen.
AMA Predicts
Flu.,Epidemic
CHICAGO (i')-The American
Medical Association said yesterday
there are strong indications that
an epidemic of Asian flu will hit
the United States in the winter
just ahead.
The association, which earlier
had warned of the possibility of
an outbreak, said the disease has
been making its way slowly around
the world from Asia since January.

TCo Establish
WASHINGTON (P) - Foreign
Minister Gerhard Schroeder of,
West Germany conferred with
President John F. Kennedy 90
minutes yesterday and announced.
afterward "full and complete
agreement" on meeting any new
Soviet move to drive the west out
of Berlin.,
But there were grave doubts
among both United States and
German informants that the two
nations had produced any formula
bridging the gap in their thinking
on the two main issues:,
-The United States expectation
that Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev is planning to whip
up a first-rate Berlin crisis after
the United States elections Nov.
6, a view the Germans think is at
least partially motivated by the
forthcoming balloting.
-The West German position
that any attempt by the Soviets
to impose visa controls on western
civilian traffic into Berlin should
be met with energetic counter-
measures, a view the United
States does not fully accept.
Schroeder gave no indication of
any such disagreement. Emerging
from Kennedy's office, he told re-
porters:
"We find ourselves in agree-
ment on the assessment of the
Berlin situation and on the meth-
ods to be applied to meet the sit-
uation."
today.

By GEORGE W. CORNELL
VATICAN CITY - Divergent
forces in the Roman Catholic Ecu-
menical Council were engaged
yesterday in an indirect struggle
for ascendancy.
It was a subtle affair couched in
careful words and parliamentary
protocol. But it was plainly an un-
dercurrent here at this grand-scale
gathering of the church's reigning
episcopate.
The test centered momentarily
and in part, on the outcome of
an election of 10 key commissions.
But it also loomed as a decisive
factor in the whole course of the
council.
Curia Power
Leaders of the cautiously tra-
ditionalist view want to keep auth-
ority closely centralized in the
Vatican curia. The progressives,
favor more local autonomy for
bishops.
The differences also had other
wide implications.
Generally, the progressives also
seek a broader interpretation on
the church's nature, extensive re-
adjustments in its practices, a big-
ger role for laymen and a more
open approach to other Christian
bodies.
General Tendencies
"There are two general tenden-
cies at work," said the Rev. John
B. Sheerin, a leading American
Catholic scholar and editor. "The
conservatives feel we should pre-'
serve the status quo. The progres-
sives believe we must change to
meet the challenges of the times."

The cross-currents have cropped
up in various ways in the first six
days of this historic council, in
formal but significant procedural
moves.
So far, these have been engi-
neered - successfully - by the
progressives.
Pope John XXIII, the domin-
.Fr-an+e Sell
Food to China
PARIS -France is disposing of
part of its surpluses of cereals
through sales to Red China, the
French Ministry for Economic Af-
fairs said yesterday.
A spokesman said France and
Red China concluded an agree-
ment last year for sale of one mil-
lion tons of cereals over a three
year period. Wheat made up the
major part of the sale.

ant spirit of the council, told a
regular weekly general audience
yesterday that he was pleased with
the way the council was progres-
sing. "We are on our way," he said.
"Don't be concerned that things
are going slowly. He who moves
slowly proceeds safely and goes
far."
His words' seemed to refute re-
ports that he had been displeased
at action by progressives early this
week to hold up voting until Tues-
day on the commission members
until bishops could survey possible
candidates more fully. -
Draft Measures
The commissions will draft mea-
sures for council consideration,
functioning much like powerful
congressional committees of the
United States House and Senate.
Alfredo Cardinal Ottaviani, in-
fluential secretary of the Supreme
Sacred Congregation of the Holy
Office and a strong traditionalist,
was reported to have raised ques-
tions about election rules.

B'NAI B'RITH H I LLEL FOUNDATION
- Registration is still open
for the Class in
"BELIEFS AND PRACTICES
OF JUDAISM"

Mondays, at 8 P.M.

1429 H ill Street

TONIGHT!

See

No Crisis

About Berlin
MOSCOW (IP) - Diplomatic
sources indicated yesterday they
see nothing in recent Soviet ac-
tions or statements suggesting
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
would precipitate a Berlin crisis
immediately after the November
elections in the United States.
These reports circulated after
the noncommitial communique cir-
culated yesterday about the
three-hour conversation between
Khrushchev and the new United
States ambassador, Foy D. Kohler.

TO SPEAK ON
GOVERNMENTAL POWER
AND
PERSONAL FREEDOM
NORMAN

SPONSORED BY
MICHIGAN UNION-
SPECIAL PROJECTS

OCT. 18
7:30 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

I

"
s 11 L
..__

BAHA'U 'LLAH
(The Glory of God)
FOUNDER
WORLD
A Few Appreciations
Of The Baha'i Faith
DR. NELS F.'S. FERRE: ~I have
been surprised at the depth and
devotional character of the best
in BAHA'1 Scriptures, as presented
in Townshend's, ;The Promise of
All Ages." (Strengthening the
Spiritual Life, Harper & Brothers.)
T O L S T O Y: "Baha'u'Lioh's
teachings now present us with the
highest and purest form of reli-
gious teaching."
DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON
CARVER: "I sympathize with the
Baha'i Faith with all my heart be-
cause it has the spirit of Christ
in it."

J

FUTURE

i

SGC CANDIDATI

FS

p

f

I

. ...

One of England's greatest schol-
ars, DR. BENJAMIN JOWETT of
OXFORD: "This Baha'i movement
is the greatest light to come into
the world since the time of Jesus
Christ. You must watch it and
never let it out of your sight. It
is too great and too near for this
generation to comprehend - the
future alone will reveal its import."

The Michigan Union
Ainaouncing
the

PETITIONING

OPEN
26

BAHA'U'LLAH
and the
CHRISTIANS
will be discussed
by Winston G. Evans
Thurs.,Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
Auditorium A, Angel Hall

GRAND OPENING
of the
NEW
Mug
TI. _J_. 1 a, t,.0X

OCT. 18

to

I

,1

"

f

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