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October 12, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE VT

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPAGE Fl

..

Boher Talks
With Botany
Department
By ARNOLD PROSTAK
An expert in the mechanism of
evolution, in plants and the geo-
graphic distribution of plant spe-
cies is visiting the University for
three days.
Prof. Tyge W. Bocher, director
of the Institute for Plant Anatomy
and Cytology of the University of
Copenhagen will leave tomorrow
to return to Copenhagen.
He delivered two lectures on his
specialties and discussed his work
with members of the botany de-
partment.
Some of Prof. Bocher's studies
are designed to unravel the in-
fluence of heredity and environ-
ment in determining plant struc-
ture. For example, he transplants
slightly different. sub-species col-
lected from different locations to
the same test plot. He observes
whether the variations uersist now
that the plants are growing in the
same eihvironment.
Another study has been of the
effect of environmental influences
on the plants 'growing in Green-
land. On the southern coast, vhere
the yearly temperature variation
is moderate, plants are found
Which are common in Europe
(which has an oceanic climate
with small temperature changes).
On the northern Greenland coast,
where the yearly temperature
range is extreme, the plant life is
native to North America (which
has a continental climate with
greater temperature fluctuations.)
Prof. Bocher's visit here follows
his attendance at the Biosystema-
tics Conference held in Montreal.
Current problems in experimental
plant classification were vigor-
ously discussed at that conference.
Library Shows
Poet's Books
A special display of Walt Whit-
man materials is now on view
through October in the Rare Book
Room of the General Library in
connection with the world pre-
miere of Richard Baldridge's "We,
Comrades Three" Oct. 10-14 at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre..
One of the University's treas-
ures, a copy of the first edition of
"Leaves of Grass," which Whit-
man sent to Ralph Waldo Emer-
son shortly after its publication in
1855, will be on display.
Also included in the exhibit are
books owned or autographed by
Whitman

VARIED PROJECTS-World University Service is involved in many programs to aid and develop
areas of the world in which poverty, disease, and illiteracy are common.
MEMBERSHIP INCREASES:
TurnerExp lains Programs o WUS

By CAROLYN WINTER
This year World University Ser-
vice has extended itself to include
three Latin American countries--
Chile, Peru and Nicaragua, Thom-
as Turner, 60,former Daily Edi-
tor said recently.
WUS is now composed of 46
national committees which cover
every continent, Turner, WUS as-
sociate secretary, noted. These
committees are made up of ad-
ministrators, teaching staff, and
students, all working together on
an equal basis.
The international organization
operates through the separate na-
tional committees and supplies the
resources that they cannot gather
themselves.
Provides Aid
Some of the ways in which WUS
suplies aid to universities and
colleges are through health pro-
jects, housing and feeding facili-
ties, educational facilities, scholar-
ship aid, seminars and surveys, he
said.
A mass X-ray project held in
India is an example of a WUS
health program, Turner explained.
The international organization
supplies the funds which the na-,
tional lacks for the work.
Housing and feeding projects
are performed in cooperation with
universities. Student workers help
build new dormitories and res-
taurants.
New educational facilities in-
clude laboratories and libraries.
Recent projects include the lan-
guage laboratory in Hong Kong,
for Chinese speaking students who
wish to learn English, and a li-

brary in Basutoland, South Africa,
Turner noted.
Scholarship aid has been given
to Angolians, Algerians and Hun-
garians as well as other needy
students, he added.
Seminars and surveys are or-
ganzied by national committees in
cooperation with the world organ-
ization. One recent effort was an
Asian health conference held in
Ceylon.
Hold Assembly
In August, the International
General Assembly of WUS was
held in Toyko. At this meeting the
national committees, including the
new committees from Chile and
Nicaragua, approved plans for new
projects.
In Chile, Nicaragua, and Peru
projects for student restaurants
and dormitories were approved.
Three major plans for South
Africa will begin operation. WUS
will continue to work through the
South African Committee on High-
er Education which can award
non-white students, who can not
receive higher degrees because of
discriminatory practices, degrees
from the University of London.
Secondly, work will be continued
Shapiro To Report
On- Cuban Travels
Samuel Shapiro will give an
"Eyewitness Report on Cuba" to-
day at 7:30 p.m. in the Multipur-
pose Room of the UGLI. The talk
will be sponsored by the Socialist
Club.

Wi

to build up the college in Basuot-
land. Basutoland is surrounded by
the Union of South Africa and is
often sought out by non-whites
from the Union to attend a higher
educational institution.
WUS is also aiding the estab-
lishment of a college in Bechuna-
land, another neighbor of the Re-
public of South Africa but which
does not have its discriminatory
policies.
Other programs planned for Af-
rica include the rebuilding if the
University of Algiers and perhaps
aid to other higher institutions
there.
Develop Areas
Also, there will be continued,
work in community development.
These include such projects as
students going into the surround-
ing areas and working on clinics,
schools, conducting classes for thes
illiterate, and programs such as
an anti-malnutrition campaign.
There will be two pilot projects
in mental health in Japan and
the Philipines. Counseling services
will be established for students
there.
The importance of a pilot pro-
ject is that it encourages the
individual governments and uni-
versities to follow the lead and
set up their own projects, Turner
explained.
The fund raising campaign at
the University will be in the spi ng
and will include a bucket drive
and auction as in previous, years.
May Cancel
Laughton Show
Actor Charles Laughton, sched-
uled to appear here on the Pro-
fessional Theatre Program sched-
ule, is suffering from what hi
doctors call cancer of the lower
spine, and "We anticipate that
Laughton will not keep his per-
formance date, but we are reserv-
ing this date or another date for
him or a substitute attraction,"
Prof. Robert C. Schnitzer, execu-
tive director of the PTP, an-
nounced.
Laughton was scheduled to
appear Feb. 9, 1963.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
mized and registered organizationsonly.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fail session should register by
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
« * *
Baha'i Student Group, "Who Is
Baha'u'llah?", Oct. 12, 8 p.m., 418 Law-
rence.
S . *«
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion,
"Transition to Peacetime Economy,"
Prof: James Morgan, Qct 12, Noon, 802
Monroe.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Group, Square Dance, Oct. 12, 8:15
p.m., 1511 Washtenaw.
Newman Club, Formal Initiation, Oct.
12, 8 p.m.; Initiation Ball-Collegiate
Five Band, Oct. 12, 8:30 p.m.; Movie,
"High Noon" with Gary Cooper, Oct. 13,
8 p.m.; 331 Thompson,
Latvian Students' Club, Meeting, Oct.
12, 8 p.m., 223 E. Ann St.

Panel Views
New Feeling
Of Faculties
By LOUISE LIND
There has been a growing pres-
sure on faculty bodies to find
representation on boards of trus-
tees, Ohio University President
Vernon R. Alden said yesterday.
Speaking on a panel discussion
of "Faculty Relationship to Trus-
tees" held in Ann Arbor before
the 40th annual convention of the
Association of Governing Boards,
Alden noted an increased demand
for more informal faculty-trustee
relations.
Alden asked panel members
Milton W. Durham, regent at
Washington State University, Prof.
Wesley H. Maurer, of the jour-
nalism department, and Prof. John
W. MacDonald, of Cornell Univer-
sity, for feasible solutions to the
problem.
Develop Understanding
"The most important step 0-
wards improving faculty-trustee
relations is the development of
mutual respect and understand-
ing," Durham commented.
"Perhaps the key to the whole
problem is communications, which
may fall under the jurisdiction of
the president, dean of faculties,
vice-president of academic affairs,
or any other number of admin-
istrators," he explained.
Prof. Maurer, viewing trustees
from the position of the faculty,
told of "trustees I have known who,
in most cases, were products of
our University.
Business World
"When new trustees took office,
you could never be sure how they
would turn out. Although all held
degrees and could boast of ad-
vanced positions in the business
world, they were not necessarily
socially literate or broad-minded.
"By the time their tenure was
over, all of them would have
changed and developed a broader
public interest."
"Ideally, the ,trustee should be
an ardent advocate of this free-
dom and should formalize the edu-
cational policy set by the faculty,
thus best fulfilling hisrole is a
lay member of the community
of scholars," Prof. Maurer con-
tinued.
MSU Claims
Urgent Need
For Housing
By MYRNA ALPERT
Michigan State University's sub-
stantial increase in its student
population has led to an imme-
diate need for adequate housing
facilities.
An increase on the East Lansing
campus of 2,400 students over the
22,637 who were there in 1961 has
had its greatest impact on the
residence hall system. There is not
enough room for all those who
wish to live in the dorms
Ninety per cent of the men are
housed three to a room which was
originally built as a double. Ap-
proximately 5,470 undergraduate
men are living in a space intended
for 4,018.
Limited Space
The problem is not as acute for
the undergraduate women. Only
seven per cent are assigned three
to a room meant to hold only two.
This means that 5,849 women are
living in 5439 spaces.
Some relief will come next fall
when a new dormitory designed to
house 1,128 students will be com-
pleted.
The officials at MSU plan to
ask the Legislature's approval to

build another dorm like the one
that is presently being constructed.
It would cost $6 million, and would
be co-educational.
Enrollment High
The total resident credit enroll-
ment at MSU at the end of the
registration period this year was
27,728 students. This is almost
an 11 per cent increase over the
comparable figure for last year
and the highest in the history of
the school, 'registrar Kermit H.
Smith reports.
The above information on over-
all growth includes the East Lan-
sing campus plus the first senior
class at the campus in Oakland,
where the enrollment is 1,256. This
also includes 1,458 students regis-
tered at MSU resident centers in'
Benton Harbor, Traverse City,
Grand Rapids, Pontiac,-Kellogg
Center in East Lansing and Sags
maw.

LINES
2
3
4

70
.85
1.00

i DAY 3 DAYS

Figure 5 average words toa line.
Phone NO 2-4786

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Man's horn-rimmed glasses near
Tappan Hall. Call NO 8-7439. A28
LOST-Horn-rimmed prescription sun-
glasses in Aud. A, 9:00 Mon. Call 5-
8732. A27
FOUND-1 pair of girl's black gloves
in choir box office. Hill Auditorium.
A24
LOST-Man's glasses, plastic rims. Be-
tween E. Ann and Kingsley on State
St. Please call 665-7694. A26
LOST-Gold necklace with the name
Merreylen on it. Please call 665-7711,
Ext. 6207. A16
LOST: Ladies watch, white gold, oval,
black face & cord band. Peggy, NO 3-
1561, ext. 812. A22
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Used Reynold's flute, re-
cond. NO 2-5012 after 6:00. B32

FOR RENT
PARKING SPACE for "cars. Rear, Fenn's
Drug Store, Forest and Huron. C48
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
NO 5-8081. C49

LAZY BOY & Ottoman. $35. Call 2-8217
after 6 p.m. B31
THOREN'S Turntable with cartridge
and base. Will bargain. NO 2-3241, ask
for Michael Jlular. B32
FOR SALE-1 long neck, 5 string Banjo.
Good cond. NO 3-6083. , B29
HALLOWEEN PUMPKINS and Decora-
tions. One mile from Stadium. 2617
Saline Rd. B27
ADDING MACHINE, electric, very good
condition. Only $35. Boersma Travel,
Nickels Arcade. B28
RALEIGH, MAN'S BICYCLE, large size,
in goo condition and. ready to use.
Call NO 5-6680 after 5 p.m. B21
FOR SALE: Women's quality used
clothing (plaid English woolen skirts)
size 10-12. Call 663-2823 mealtimes. B6
DISPOSING OF MY LARGE LIBRARY
at private sale. Rare opportunity for
students to build up a library of good
books at low prices. Specia low prices
on sets of books. Showings at 617
Packard St. (near State) from 12
to 4 p.m. every except Sunday. B2
CHRISTIAN ENTERPRISES
STORE
3650 CARPENTER ROAD
PHONE-NO 8-9629
Tue., wed., Thur.-8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Open: Mon., Fri., Sat.-8 a.m.-9 p.m.
Furnishings for home or apartment.
Re-upholstered and refinished furni-
ture.

4

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

*EflEGSr2

1.95
2.40
2.85

5 MINUTES from campus; 1 bedrm.
apt, to share. L. Levin, 721 S. Forest,
Apt. 306, 6-8 p.m. C50
ROOM for female student. NO 5-0393
after 5. 024
ON CAMPUS-Well furn, apt. for 2 men.
$100. 3 men, $115. Call 5-4767 bet.
1 and 5 p.m. 3-4660 mornings and
evenings, 6-9 p.m. C47
Apartments for Rent
CARL D. MALCOLM, Jr., REALTOR
Phone NO 3-0511, evenings:
NO 5-9271 and NO 5-6634
C6
STUDENTS
Several apartments available in cam-
pus and Burns Park area.
APARTMENTS, LIMITED
NO 3-0511 Eveninugs
NO 5-9271 and !5-6634
C45
APARTMENTS FOR RENT-A limited
number of two-bedroom furnished
apartments available for November
assignment to married students or
faculty with two or more children.
Apply at University Apartments Office,
2364 Bishop St., North Campus, or
phone 662-3169 or 663-1511, Ext. 3569.
C31
ACT NOW
Studios from $111.00
1-bedroom from $130.00
Bus transportation to campus
and Ann Arbor' business district.
HURON TOWERS
NO 3-0800, NO 5-9162
STUDENTS
Do you want to live in a new,
luxury two - bedroom, furnished
apartment -- But do not have
enough roommates to carry the
load-don't hesitate-call Apart-
ments "Ltd, NO 3-0511. Evenings
NO 5-9271, NO 5-6634. We will ar-
range meetings for interested
parties. Hurry-only four available.
C27
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTO
Officers' Shoes
Army-Navy Oxfords-$7.95
Socks 39c Shorts 69c
Brasso 69c
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington
MISCELLANEOUS
COMING
NOV. 10
ANN ARBOR HIGH
THE INCREDIBLE
CARLOS
MONTOYA
M7
CURLY LASAGNA, Rotino macaroni,
Syrian bread - Hot dogs.
We have them all at . . .
RALPH'S MARKET
709 PACKARD
Ml
WANTED TO BUY.
USED FIREPLACE screen, tools. Living
Language Records (French). NO 5-
9206. K3
BUSINESS SERVICES

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

STUDENT WIVES

Hide-A-Beds $64.50
Sofa Beds $37.50
Platform Rockers $22.50
Occasional Chairs 3.50
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES
Refrigerators $29.50
Electric ranges $27.50
Gas ranges 15.00
Washing machines 17.50
Television sets 27.50.
Radios 4.50
Desks 4.50
Dining Room sets 24.50
Bedroom suites 42.50

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SuhcrheNow
at Hall Price*
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daily newspaper for the next six
months for $5.50, just half the
regular subscription rote.
Get top news coverage. Enjoy
special features. Clip for refer-
ence work.
Send your order today. Enclose
check or money order. Use cou-
pon below.
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Send your newspaper for the time
checked.
SQ6 months $5.50 01year $11
Q College Student Q Faculty Member
Name
Address
City Zone State
*This special offer available ONLY to college
students, faculty members, and college libraries.

ROOM AND BOARD
SINGLE IN private home. 900 Arbordale.
665-8188. £Cis
WANTED TO RENT
BILL: CalldKaren.
A friend L43
HELP WANT ED
ATTENTION NURSES: Michigan reg-
istered graduate and licensed practi-
cal nurses for special duty, esp. in
4-12 and 12-8 shifts. Full-time or part-
time nurses. NO 3-4859.
EXPERIENCED Bookkeeper-Accountant,
female preferred, full-time. Small
business firm. By appointment. 663-
5723.,1H24
BACKGROUND in Social Work or social
sciences-experience in Education, In-
formation Programming, Real Estate,
Home Financing, Depth Interviewing
and family Health Welfare, Services
are relevant,yettnot required. Posi-
tion of RELOCATION OFFICER for
an Urban Renewal Program. Call 483-
0045 for interview arrangement. H25
WANTED-Porter to do light housework
for lunches and dinner. About 12
hours per week. Call Paul, 663-8517.
H121
RECEPTIONIST - Experienced. Should
be able to type. To work on Sat.
afternoons and Sun. Interesting work
-attractive office. Interviewing 4:30-
5:30 p.m. Thurs. and Fri. or Sat. 9-
10 a.m. Twining Aviation, 4320 S.
State Road, Municipal Airport. H23
POETS WANTED
Paid Psychological Research
If you write poetry, you may be quali-
fied to join our experiment on imagi-
nation and life attitudes. For infor-
mation call Dr. Hoffberg or Dr. Fast,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 3324 weekdays 8-5, or
Write Box FC. H121
WANTED-Full figured girl, 18 to 23,
single, for national advertising model-
ing nude and semi. Experience not
necessary. Reply to Box 341 with pic-
tures and statistics. Photo will be
returned and appointments made for
personal interview, local studio. H19
PHOTOGRAPHERS NEEDED for The
Michigan Daily Staff. Use Daily
equipment, get paid for pictures. Work
four hours a week. Meet interesting
people, photograph the stars. Come
in between 3 and 5 and ask-for
Caroline. The Daily needs you.

11

Miscellaneous articles of all kinds.
Clothing for the entire family.
One set of Corpus Juris Law books.
C34
USED CARS
'55 4 DOOR DE SOTO, power steering,
brakes. $300. 110 Grand View. N27
'58 4-door Ford. Excellent condition.
311 Awixa, NO 3-0211. N24
'58 TRIUMPH. Excellent condition, new
Pirelli tires, engine overhauled. $1,095.
NO 3-5446. N17
1951 MG-TD ROADSTER. Red, good
condition, new engine. Call NO 3-
7541, Ext. 605. N22
'55 2-DR. CHEV. Good clean car, stand-
ard trans. $325. HU 2-9425.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE to Mt. Pleasant Oct. 19. Please
call NO 3-1561, Ext. 149. G15
WANTED: ride for two to Chicago or
as close to Omaha as possible, leav-
ing Ann Arbor Friday afternoon, Oc-
tober 19. Call 3-1561, ext. 320- for
Betty or 3-3384 for Fran. E. 012
Drive Yourself . . .
AND SAVE'
pickups, panels, stakes,
MOVING VANS'
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
59 Ecorse Road
Ypsilanti, Michigan
PERSONAL
MOON OVER Madison Ave. F27
THE NEW MUG IS OPENING SOON
IN THE MICHIGAN UNION. F31
DANCE Saturday nite, Pittsfield Grange
Hall, Saline-AA Road. Public Invited.
F44
BUBBLING BROOK: Where art thou?
Mais ou sont les nieges d'antan .
P46
LIMELITERS, Hill Auditorium, Oct. 14,
8 P.M. Tickets on sale at Hill Audi-
torium Box Office. Prices: $3.50, $2.50,
$1.50. P32
LOST: One elephont, vicinity Fishbowl.
Reward. Would appreciate return be-
fore the 27th. Call Andy, NO 9-2160.
F47
MY DEAREST DARLING Edward, Funny
thing happened yesterday-I think,
altho I don't know-Changing opinion
of G.S. Opinion of you remains the

.

Exciting job with Sarah Coventry
awaits you. Immediate, income in
year around work with high earn-
ings. If you have transportation
and three evenings available and are
neat appearing you nay phone NO
2-1908 for interview between 2.4
p.m. 8il
BIKES and SCOOTERS
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 45 cub. in. Sacri-
fice. $150. Jon Fredrickson, NO .5-
6115. Z21
A Bike is a Necessity
Michigan's campus becomes
Accessible with a
BEAVER BIKE
Save your feet and enjoy
fall rides through the Arb.
We Have EVERYTHING in
bike accessories.
Beaver Bike Shop
605 Church NO 5-6607
MUSICAL MDSE
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
AM/FM
Portable Radio
$79.95 list,
Our price $59.95
Big Savings on
Recording Tape
Hi F i Center
304 Thayer
KRAME R SAYS:
Are You Out
Of It'?

CAMPUS UNITED NATIONS
October 19 & 20
Here is your opportunity to develop an appreciation for the
ethical values of other cultures, to participate in a basic re-
appraisal of the role of the United Nations, while having fun
becoming acquainted with students from other countries. If you
would like to take advantage of this opportunity or want more
.f.

!M-

I

TYPING DONE in my home. HU 2-
4246,after 6 p.m. J10
AVON REPRESENTATIVE. Mrs. Trice,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 3221. i11
MANUSCRIPTS, TERM PAPERS typed,
Multilith Offset for reproduction,
Photo copy, mailings. Gretzinger's
Business Service, 320 S. Huron. HU
2-0191. J8
TYPING-Dissertation or thesis ready
for typing? For fast, accurate and
economical service by typists familiar
with graduate school requirements,
contact Ann Arbor Typing and Print-
ing Service, 117 S. Main, Ann Arbor
or call 663-2587. J9
The Harriest Shop in Town
M-DEN BARBERS
across from the Hill Auditorium
Basement of Michigan Pharmacy
J76
WASHTENAW CAFE
GERMAN AND AMERICAN CUISINE
We specialize in
German foods.
STUDENT SPECIALS DAILY
211 N. Main

The Presbyterian Campus Center
of the University of Michigan
cordially invites you to attend
The First Merrill Lecture of 1962-1963
"AN OPEN MIND AND A BROKEN HEART"
delivered by
THE REV. JAY ROBERT CALHOUN

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