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October 11, 1962 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-11

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___THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r
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Ford Foundation Donates Theatre Grants

v

Professor Discusses
Critics of 'Stranger'

Grants totaling $6,100,000 to
strengthen nine professionalnon-
profit' repertory theatres from
coast to coast have been donated
by the Ford Foundation.
This was the first action voted
by the foundation under its ex-
panded program of assistance to
he arts, and exceeds any previous
heatre appropriations.
"We are now carrying our pro-
gram to a new dimension," said
Ienry T. Heald, president of the
foundation. "In preparing for this,
he foundation has made efforts
0 identify professional groups
apable first of steady artistic de-
relopment and secondly of achiev-
ng a sustaining level of income

CERTIFICATION:
Screening Method Unchanged

from other sources within a rea-
sonable period."
Chief Hope
W. McNeil Lowry, the director
of the foundation's arts program,
noted that the emergence of per-
manent repertory theatres in the
last decade had become "the chief
hope for the advancement of seri-
ous American drama" because
these theatres were "fast becom-
ing' a major outlet for the profes-
sional dramatist, director and ac-
tor and the most important ave-
nue for the development of young-
er theatre artists and technicians."
Such theatres are distinguished
from other professional theatre
ventures, Mr. Lowry explained by

11

If

11

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
PRIESENTS
Danny Kaye in
"KNOCK ON WOOD"11
Because Roman Holiday has
been withdrawn by its makers,

their nonprofit status and by con-
tinuous seasons of 40 to 52 weeks
that include seven to a dozen plays.
Such a theatre is the APA, en-
gaged this year by the University
as a resident theatre company un-
der a three year contract.
No Application
The APA made no application.
this year for the Ford Foundation
grants, Prof. Robert C. Schnitzer
of the University speech depart-
ment commented yesterday.
Prof. Schnitzer explained that
most of the companies receiving
grants were well established as
groups with the stability of a set
locale, while the APA, although "as
excellent as any of the ones that
received grants" will have a per-
manent base of operations for the
first time this year.
Heill er Cites
Music Study
By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Anton Heiller, a foremost Bach
specialist, organist, composer and
professor of organ at the Academy
of Music in Vienna, prefers church
and choir music, playing in many
of the finest European churches.
As a composer he'writes almost
exclusively church and choir mu-
sic, among them two oratorios.
"I am a composer still in the
developing stages and cannot give
a valid statement concerning my
personal style," he says.
"Hindemith is my favoriate con-
temporary organ composer," he.
continues, "because he is so mod-
est, a quality I appreciate in a
composer."
Heiller explained that the in-'
terest Americans have for organ
recitals varies throughout the'
country, although slowly these re-'
citals are becoming as popular as
in many places in Europe.
A good slider chest and tracker
action arethe most important
features for an organ, stated Heil-
ler, also an authority on organ
construction. These facilitate a
rapid production of sound after
the key has been pressed, he con-
tinued.
Having toured extensivelyl
throughout Europe, Heiller be-
lieves the finest organs are foundi
in Denmark and Holland. The
Dutch. are extremely favorable to-l
ward organ music, he remarked. z
Heiller entered the Academy of
Music in Vienna in 1941 and took
his final examinations for organ1
and harpsichord in 1942, one year
after his admission to the academy.
In 1945 he was appointed professor
of organ at the academy.k

By RUTH HETMANSKI
Prof. Joseph Adelson of the psy
chology department spoke las
night on the psychological ap.
proach to literary criticism and it,
relevance to Albert Camus' "Th
Stranger."
Prof. Adelson, speaking at th
sixth seminar on Albert Camu
sponsored by the reading and dis.
cussion group of Student Goverfn
ment Council, first explained th
psychological approach to criti-
cism.
Literary critics have absorber
the psychological approach int<
their work so much that there isn'1
really a separate "psychologica
school." The study of imagery an(
symbolism has been woven into E
purely literary approach, produc.
ing a combination, he said.
Contributions
The contributions of the psy.
chological approach to literary
criticism are: a biographical in.
terest, explaining why an authoi
turns to certain themes; an il-
lumination of the motifs of the
work itself; and an understand-
ing of the mechanisms which pro-
duce effects upon the reader.
Proceeding into the analysis of
"The Stranger," Prof. Adelson said
it can be read as an example of
the dynamics of the unconscious
conscience. A conscious conscience,
Prof. Adelson explained, makes its
workings clear and is a sign of a
healthy individual.
An unconscious conscience works
insidiously, producing vague feel-
ings of depression and ill-being
upon the individual rather than
the healthy and understood guilt
feelings produced by the conscious
conscience. It is this unconscious
conscience at-work on the criminal
whose guilt feelings are the cause
of, rather than the result of, his
crime. He needs to achieve punish-
ment for aguilt of which he is not
aware.
Guilty Hero
Such is the case with the hero in
"The Stranger." From a psycholog-
ical standpoint, his feelings of list-
lessness and boredom are the re-
sult of his unconscious guilt feel-
ings at learning of the death of
his mother. From a purely literary
point of view, this might be called
a manifestation of an existential-
ist philosophy.
Shakespeare's' "Hamlet" and
Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punish-
ment" also depend on many of
the same psychological occurrences
which appear in "The Stranger,"
Prof. Adelson said. He believes that
"The Stranger" is a direct succes-
sor to "Crime and Punishment,"
and that it was planned to be so
by Camus.

Cinema Guild is showing what
we think is Danny Kaye's
best comedy, Knock On Wood,
Thursday and Friday.

ALBERT CAMUS
.. under discussion
NO ZOO:
''Animals
Need Home
By THOMAS HUNTER
Need a bear- Or a fox or a rac-
coon? A skunk maybe?
Prof. Irving G. Reimann of the
zoology department, the director
of exhibits at the natural science
museum, must get rid of two bears,
five raccoons, a fox and a skunk,
and very soon. Their home, the
miniature zoo behind the museum
on Forest Avenue, is coming down
to make way for the new million-
dollar-plus bio-systematics labor-
atory and museum.
One fox escaped three or four
weeks ago - he has lived only in
captivity, and Reimann does not
give him much chance to survive-
but this is obviously not the most
desirable way to solve the problem.
Instead, Reiman must find a re-,
ceiver acceptable to the state con-
servation commission. This in-
cludes the larger public zoos,1
sometimes private roadside zoos,
and rarely private individuals. The
bears provide the greatest prob-
lem.
The University is not favorable
to maintaining the zoo. The city
had ideas of opening its own small
public zoo, but has shelved such
ideas to the future when funds are
more abundant. Several other
large zoos around the country
have put in bids, but all have
been withdrawn.
There remains only the Kansas
State Industrial Reformatory. Rei-
mann said it would possibly want;
to start a zoo for its inmates. A;
decision is due from Kansas soon.
If this one last appeal should
be turned down, Reimann said:
that he would be able to dispose
of the smaller animals in various
ways. For the bears, though - it
would be a fatal decision.I

By JEAN TENANDER
"There have been no substantial
changes in the method of screen-
ing students applying for teach-
ing certificates," Prof. Lowell
Beach, coordinator of Student
Teaching in Elementary Educa-
tion, said Tuesday.
Because of the increasing num-
ber of applications to the certifi-
cation program the admission pro-
cedure has necessarily been for-
malized and in the process be-
come more selective, but there has
not been a substitution of any
new criteria.
The Nov. 1 deadline has always
been in effect, but previously the
number of students involved did
not require strict adherence to it.
Increasing enrollment has forced
the Education school to demand
strict compliance with application
procedures, however.
Official Letter
The one new innovation that has
been introduced is the practice of
sending the students who have
been admitted an official letter
announcing their admission. Prior
to this, the student would assume
if he heard nothing that he had
been chosen to enter the program.
The increased enrollment has
also had repercussions in the area
of student teaching. At present a
great number of the students seem
to be concentrating in English,
social studies, and the teaching of
emotionally disturbed children.
Unfortunately, this concentra-
tion has reached the point where
assignments are no longer avail-
able to all those who wish to teach
in these fields.
At present, the only solution to
this problem is for the student to
either alter the field in which he
had hoped to teach or to take a
semester off campus. About 10 per
cent of student teaching is taken
off campus now, but these are all
instances where a student has
sought specifically to teach in a
certain school and has been grant-
ed permission. The choice may no
longer be voluntary.1
Will Expand'
Local districts will, of course, be
expanding and may be expected to
double their enrollment within the

< >

By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER
New York commercial theatre
audiences prefer the new to the
traditional, the splendid to the
genuine, the obvious to the subtle,
the "sexy" to. the immoral, and
always the known star or play-
wright to the unknown, drama
critic Henry Hewes said last night.
.Today's Broadway producer is a
"merchandiser of material," dis-
torting plays to assure their suc-
cess, Hewes, drama editor of the
"Saturday Review of Literature,"
continued.
"The Broadway producer often
looks at a play from its selling
angle," with no respect to wheth-
er it may be good or bad or wheth-
er the stars and director are suit-
able, he added.
The plays on and sometimes off
Broadway today exemplify these
attitudes, he said..
Realism, Glamor
"The Caretaker," with its stark
realism, failed in the face of more
glamorous and splendid produc-
tions, he explained. The public
wants realism.but at the same time
glamour such as it found in the
historical play, "A Man for All
Seasons" with its handsome set-
tings and costumes.
In "O Dad, Poor Dad; Mama's
Hung You in the Closet and I'm
Feelin' So Sad the main attrac-
tion is the "marvelous seduction
scene which is wonderfully erotic
and funny" at the same time,
Hewes noted. Thus a good play of
subtle insight would have been lost
were it not for "the eroticism that
makes it a success."
Sexy, But Moral
But although a play which is
"sexy" will be a success, one which
is immoral will not be, Hewes said.
Plays like "Under the Yum-Yum
Tree" and "Come Blow Your Horn"

Audiences Prefer Glamour;
Realism Found a Failure

s'--

next ten years but it is doubtful
that they will grow as rapidly as
the needs of the Education School.
In the face of the shortage of
student teaching positions, it would
be a mistake not to try to accom-
modate the interests of the stu-
dents, Prof. Beach said, but the
problem is a difficult one.

The stricter implementation of
the admission requirements start-
ed last spring will have no hand
in lessening the shortage since the
number of students will not be al-
tered. Its only effect will be to in-
sure that future students will be
of a consistently high quality, he
said.

are successful because despite
much sex, they end morally; but
"The Good Soup," a better play,
was not as successful because its
ending is realistic and immoral,
Hewes added.
"We must grow up and face
problems" in the theatre, Hewes
continued. "The kind of theatre I
like is a dangerous disease. True
theatre for me is anti-social, im-
moral, realistic and infects us with
ideas. Although perhaps my col-
leagues do not agree with me, the
theatre urges us to live more dan-
gerously, more awarely," Hewes
explained.
In response to a question he
said the solutions to these prob-
lems lie in the subsidized theatre,
the spreading of regional theatre,
and in the university theatres. The
good plays well received in these
areas will hopefully improve the
quality of the national theatre lev-
el, he concluded.
Across
Campus
Marketing ..
The Marketing Club will hold.its
first meeting at 7:30 p.m. today
in Rm. 131, Business Administra-
tion Bldg. The program will fea-
ture Gerard Murphy, assistant for
marketing and 'research with D.
P. Brothers and Co. of Detroit, dis-
cussing "The Image of Advertis-
ing and Advertising Executives,"
the results of a recent survey.
Russia.. .
Dennis Papazian, lecturer in his-
tory at the Dearborn Center, will
speak at 8 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham West Conference Rm. on
"Archives, Education, and Travel
in the Soviet Union."
Camus
The final Student Government
Council reading and discussion
seminar on Albert Camus will fea-
ture a panel discussion at 9 p.m.
today in the Multipurpose Rm. of
the UGLI.
Computers...
Prof. John A. Jacquez will lec-
ture on "Digital Computers. Appli-
cation" at 5 p.m. today in the

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PHYSICAL-
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ENGINEERING,
MATHEMATICS

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Recent technical graduates coming into AC are offered a 32-week
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ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS-FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 1962
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Church Group
Sponsors Aid
To 'UT' Student
The International Scholarship
Program of the Methodist Church
has sponsored 97 Crusade Schol-
arships this year.
Miss Minako Furuta, Grad, is a
holder of one of these scholarships,
which provides for tuition, books
and living expenses. Miss Furuta
holds a bachelor of arts and mas-
ter of arts degrees from Aoyami
Gakuin, a Tokyo university. She
is doing graduate work in the field
of linguistics.
Seventy-six of the 97 Crusade
Scholars are attending colleges and
universities in the United States.

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A six-part special series of Fri-
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Covering topics from Shake-
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The fast-moving,
fast-growing business to talk to is'
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October 25, 26, & 29
when the Bell System Recruiting Team
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