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October 04, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-10-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. OC:TMER d- I i92

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUTTR~flAV flflTfl1~I'D A IOD@
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Camus' Works Explain World

'STUDYING MICHIGAN'S SCHOOLS':
To View Facts, Needs
Of Community Colleges

DIAL 5-6290

ENDING TONIGHT
ALEC GUINNESS
IN
"DAMN THE DEFIANT"

time explaining it as being un-
explainable, Prof. Nelson said.
The absurd postulates that the
world is in disorder and the mind
seeks a rationality to combat this
absurdity, he explained. The ex-
terior world has no laws, and yet
by saying that the world is a law-
less place it immediately has at
least one law.
Inherent Flaw
"Camus has set up a situation
which has an inherent flaw in it
and therefore cannot be consider-
ed a valid contribution to philo-
sophy."
, Examining other French authors
whose works may have influenced
Camus, Prof. Nelson said he be-
lieves that Camus was not original
in the ideas he emphasizes in his
novels. Andre Malraux, for ex-
ample, has expressed many of the
same ideas. Malraux's "Man's
Fate" is basically a first edition
of Camus' "The Plague," Prof.
Nelson said.
In "Man's Fate" the same situa-
tion of a city walled in by siege
and the same problem of how to
react to this occurrence exists.
Even though the exterior world has

r

Every Thursday 4:30 to 6:00 P.M.

no meaning, action may give it
some degree of personal meaning,
Prof. Nelson said.
Rending Passion
"The absurd is the most tearing,
rending passion a man can have."
Camus points out three problems
which arise from this state: exile,
suffering, and revolt.
Exiles occur because we cannot
talk to our fellow man, Prof. Nel-
son said. This is the case because
language comes from the world of
the absurd. We suffer because it
is inherent in man's nature to
suffer and to cause suffering. Both
'physical and moral suffering 'are
involved, he said.
"The flaw in this belief comes
with the third problem that Cam-
us causes to arise out of the ab-
surd. He assumes every individual
revolts and is going to revolt
against the separation' of reason
and the senseless world around
him. This is not necessarily a valid
hypothesis."
All men do not react to the ab-
surd, Prof. Nelson said. "Many do
not even realize it exists. When
Camus blithely attributes sensi-
tivity and perception to all man-
kind, he is overstepping the cred-
ulity of his readers."
Yet Camus should be thought of
primarily as a "nice guy." He
symbolizes Judeo-Christian moral-
ity without the God. He is pri-
marily an organizer, since he
starts with reality and then or-
ganizes it, Prof. Nelson added.
Camus has been criticized for his
lack of positive philosophy by such
men as Sartre.
"Sartre is a philosophiser who
writes books, while Camus is a
philosophiser who philosophises."
Homeco min
To Or canize
Elephant Race
Homecoming will have an un-
usual attraction this year - an
elephant race.
Three of the animals - or more
if demand warrants them - will
be available for races Oct. 26 at
Ferry Field, Homecoming Co-
Chairmen Susan Brockway, '63,
and Charles Mann, '64, announced
yesterday.
As many as five housing units or
individuals may join in sponsoring
an elephant. The cost of renting
an animal is $225.
Mann and Miss Brockway called
the event "the first of its kind in
the Midwest." All necessary ap-
proval for the program has been
secured, they added.
Efforts are being made to secure
participation of other schools in
the elephant races.
"All safety precautions are be-
ing arranged, including the pres-
ence of firemen and police," the
co-chairmen said. Each elephant
will be accompanied by a trainer.

JAMES H. ROBERTSON
... discusses committee

EVERYONE WELCOME

if

NOW TH RU
SATURDAY

To Analyze
'U' Facilities
A joint committee formed to
analyze the facilities and services
of the Michigan Union and the
Michigan League and to determine
whether there are "other, more ef-
fective means" of providing these
services held its first meeting
Tuesday.
The committee was formed at
the request of the boards of di-
rectors of both organizations, As-
sociate Dean of the literary college
James H. Robertson, chairman,
said.
Committee members include-
from the Union Board, John E.
Tirrell, general secretary of the
Alumni Association, Prof. Richard
E. Balzheiser of the engineering
college and Bruce Groom, '63;
From the League Board are
Mrs. Russell N. DeJong and Mrs.
William Halstead.
Union officers are Robert Finke,
'63, president; John Carlson, '63,
executive vice-president; and Al-
bert Acker, '63, administrative
vice-president.
League officers are Margaret
Skiles, president; Susan Sprunk,
'63, executive vice-president; Al-
lyn Thompson, '63, administrative
vice - president; and Gretchen
Groth, '64, coordinating vice-presi-
dent.
Center offers
Short Courses
The University Medical Center
will offer thirty-five short courses
for practicing physicians this year,
Dr. John Sheldon, director of the
department of postgraduate medi-
cine said recently.
Individual announcements of
courses are available in the post-
graduate medical offices.
Among the courses offered are
seven "drive-in courses" for doc-
tors living within easy commut-
ing distance of Ann Arbor.
A popular course last year,
"Cardiac Resuscitation" will be
given Oct. 8.

By GERALD STORCH
As part of a concerted six-year
program to filter an understand-
ing of the facts and needs of the
state's education system down to
the grass-roots level, "phase five"
of "Studying Michigan's Schools"
is centering on Michigan's 68 uni-
versities, colleges and technical in-
stitutions.
Within the next two or three
months, each community college
will hold a leadership training
program for interested individuals
who will then speak to parent-
teacher associations and similar
local organizations on the "vital
issues facing higher education,"
Prof. Stanley E. Dimond of the
education school said yesterday.
Prof. Dimond is a member of
a "task force," composed of rep-
resentatives from several state
colleges and universities, which
has prepared a booklet designed
"to get some reflection of opin-
ion" from the public about these
issues, which include:
Crucial Questions
Should all high school graduates
be guaranteed admission to at
least one college within the state,
and should admissions be restrict-
ed to in-state students;
Should federal funds be request-
ed to supplement the state Legis-
lature's appropriations, and should
students pay a greater proportion
of costs than they do at present;
Should the 70,000-student in-
crease in enrollment during the
1960's be handled mainly by ex-
panding existing institutions or
should the number and size of
community colleges be increased;
Should coordination of the
state's colleges be on a voluntary
or compulsory basis; and
Should any given individual
curriculum be designated for a
single institution or be available
at several?
Knowledge, -Improvement
Prof. Dimond -h o p e s that
through discussion of these issues,
parents will begin to recognize the
present and future problems con-
fronting higher education, and
"actively participate" in attempts
at improvement.
He noted the great anxiety
which parents, even of elementary
school children, seem to have over
the future of their offspring's edu-
cation, and feels that perhaps this
concern can be transmitted into
a general realization of and sym-
pathy with the difficult tasks
ahead for the state's schools.
Besides the speeches to be given
at PTA's several regional confer-
ences will be held to discuss higher
education issues. Two have al-
ready been put on at Jackson and
Grand Rapids, and Extension Di-
rector Everett J. Soop has gone
to both meetings, providing infor-
mation and answering questions.
State Conference
The climax of "phase five" will
come next spring with the Annual
Citizens' Education Conference,

held under the supervision of
Superintendent of State Instruc-
tion Lynn Bartlett. The focus of
this meeting will be on the needs
of higher education and is ex-
pected to stimulate state-wide dis-
cussion on the matter.
The previous four "phases"
have included a set of basic facts
about local and state education,
a discussion guide of the most
pertinent issues and areas of con-
troversy, a program outlining the
costs of the state's schools, and
publications on local school pro-
grams.
These activities have reached
approximately 400,000 Michigan
citizens.
Started in 1958
"Studying Michigan Schools"
was initiated in 1958 mainly at
the behest of the Michigan Con-
gress of Parents and Teachers,
and quickly gained support from
various educational, political and
civic organizations.
It will end next June with an
extensive summary of the pro-
gram's accomplishments a n d
findings.
To Perform
On Carillon
A recital will be given at 7:15
p.m. today by Sidney F. Giles,
University assistant carillonneur.
The program will open with two
of his own compositions and will
continue with other pieces espe-
cially arranged for carillon.
Among the selections will be
"Chacone" by Durand, "Avond-
Stemming" by Lefevere and "So-
nata in Antique Style" by Price.

FRIDAY *
BLUE RIBBON
SNEAK PREVIEW
at 9 P.M.
A Comedy-Color--We cannot divulge title
Come at 7 or 9 p.m.
OUR REGULAR FEATURE
The Amazing, The Hilarious
FROM TEACHER TO
TYCOON IN TEN'
LIGHT-FINGERED LESSONS.

A VIMITMI OfC GRINAO "OMUTlOM
NADIACAY REHEAT LR OM
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FRI. & SAT.

NIGHT-SAT. & SUN. MATINEE

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GNmSCOPE
COLOR by DE LUXE

THE UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Proudly Presents .

4

I

"TARZAN GOES TO INDIA" Shown at 1-3:50-6:50 & 9:30
_ RNma ..SY WHNTRUB ..m..
SGATO
w r =JOCK MAHONEY
AND *
"THE TARTARS" Shown at 2:30-5:30-8:25

x ue P9*
iROWCTKM1
i -A&,

* SUNDAY *
ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
"THE SKY ABOVE"
THE MUD BELOW"

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN
The Daily Bulletin is an official Law Schools Admissions Test--Appli- Sonata-In Antique Style Price
publication of the University of cation forms for the next testing time Allegro
Michigan for which The Michigan should be completed now in order to Andante
Daily assumes no editorial respon- be registered for the Nov. 10th test. Minuet
sibility. Notices should be sent in Forms are obtainable at the Jr.-Sr. Rondo Alegro
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564 Concentration Office, 1223 Angell Hall Selections Arranged for the Carfillon:
Administration Building before 2 and should be mailed away without de- Eerste Fantasia Benoit
p.m. two days preceding publication. lay. Serenata Haydn
Reveries d'Antonne (No. 3
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4 Rhodes scholarships - Application Moment Triste) Rebikoff
forms may be secured at the Jr.-Sr. Menuet Bach
CleConcentration Office, 1223 Angell Hall. Marche Turque Mozart
Completed applications must be return-
5:00 p.m.-Biomedical Data Processing ed to that office by Oct. 15th to be The Linguistics Club 'of the Univ. of
Program Lecture Series - considered for the current competition. Mich. invites faculty members and stu-
Prof. John A. Jaquez, "Pro- _dents to its meeting on Thurs., Oct. 4,
graiJming: introduction":at 8:30 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
School of Public Health Aud. Events theatre.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild-Brod- Prof. Kenneth L. Pike, prof. of un-
erick Crawford, Mercedes Doctoral Examination for Rashid Lut- guistics, "Controlled Redundancy and
McCambridge, and John Ire- fallah Bashshur, Sociology; thesis: "The Syntax Paradigms."
land, "All the King's Men": Influence of Ecological Factors on
Architecture Aud. Values in the Detroit Area," Thurs., Placem ent
8:30 p.m.-Professional Theatre Pro- Oct. 4, 5609 Haven Hall, at 1:00 p.m.
gram-Rosemary Harris and Co-Chairmen, R. C. Angell and G. E. ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
Will Geer, "School for Scan- Lenskiy VIEW-Seniors & grad students, please
day": Lydia Mendelssohn sign interview schedule posted at 128-H
Theatre. The Univ. of Mich. School of Music W. Engrg. Bldg.
Carillon Recital: By Sidney F. Giles, OCT. 5-
s sistant Univ. Carillonneur, Thurs., U.S. Air Force-BS-MS: AE & Astro.,
Genr a Notices oct. 4, 7:15 p.m.ChE, CE, Const., Geodetic, Pub. Wks.
Actuarial Club: Organizational meet- Compositions for the Carillon: Admin., Communication Sci., EE, EM,
ing 3 p.m., Oct. 4, in 3017 Angell Hall, Prelude No. 1 Giles IE, Mat'ls., ME, Meteo., Met., NA &
for election of officers and program Reverie Giles Engrg. Both Men & Women. Officer
planning. All actuarial students wel- Chacone Durand Training School-Pilot & Navigator
come. Avond-Stemming Lefevere (Continued on Page 5)

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Broderick Crawford, Mercides McCambridge,
John Ireland.
(Rbt. Renn Warren's novel about Huey Long).
3 ACADEMY AWARDS. Cartoon.

i

Emmanuelle Riva, Eyi Okada.
SHORT: D. W. Griffith's Broken Ways, with
Blanche Sweet, Henry B. Walthall, Harry Carey.

11

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AR"THUR MURRAY'Sy
COLLEGE NIGHT DANCE
Dancing from
9:30 to 12:00
Friday,, Oct. 5th.
Lessonette in Cha-Cha
included
Refreshments available
Admission $1 per person-
7 .Coat and tie required
.. 4rr,

i

Beaver's not only has the BEST REPAIR SERVICE in

I

Town, but also the biggest value for your money,

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