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September 30, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-30

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TWO

SUNDAY, Sl
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EPTEMBER 30, 196

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'U' Provides Various Outlets for Creative Writing

PROGRAM NOTES:
'School for Scandal' Opens Wednesday

By JOHN HERRICK

The University and its communi-
ty offer one of the most fertile
grounds for growth and training
for students interested in crea-
tive writing.
To start with the most profitable
(money) aspect, there is the Jule
and Avery Hopwood literary con-
test.
This is the biggest cash literary
award system in the country. More
than $15,000 is awarded to stu-
dents each year on the basis of
submitted manuscripts.
Directions
Further information on this for
both the curious and the interest-
ed is available in the Hopwood
Rm. on the first floor of Angell
Hall. Enter between the pillars,
turn right and it's the first door
on your left.
Publication or performance are
here, too-in abundance. "Gen-
eration" is the campus inter-arts
magazine and is usually a quarter-
ly. Almost all of the manuscripts
it publishes are written by stu-
dents, and a few select faculty'
members, on this campus. True,
there is no pay, but then again:
there is no charge either.
And "Gargoyle" is back (may-
be). That's the campus humor
magazine and is open to cartoons
and humor articles from contribu-
tors.
Maybe you've written a play and
want it produced. Impossible? Not3
at all.

Musket this year is doing an
original musical by Jack O'Brien
and Bob James, both graduate stu-
dents here. The old Junior Girls
Play is planning on doing another
original musical by Milan Stitt,
'63. The University Players are
doing "A Matter of Style," a com-
edy by Jack O'Brien, grad.

The University Players also pro-
duce one-acts as a Laboratory
Playbill series at 4:10 p.m. on most
Thursdays. Last year there were
seven original one-acts by students
on this campus produced by the
Lab Playbill series. Interested stu-
dents should speak to Prof. Wil-
liam Halstead of the speech de-
partment.

Survey Analyzes Length
Ot GraduatePrograms
(Continued from Page 1) 14

And by enrolling in a creative
writing course, the student is al-
lowed contact with both the per-
sons and the works of contem-
poraries He is given something
approximating publication by hav-
ing his manuscripts read and criti-
cized in class. In short, he is given
the opportunity to respond to and
defend himself against the socie-
ty his work must come out of.
As to the oft-alleged stifling of
the writer by classes, the answer
of Prof. Robert Haugh of the Eng-
lish department is to bring up Ger-
trude Stein's Paris apartment. This
apartment was probably one of
the best seminars ever available
in creative writing. Among the
people who attended these "sem-
inars" were Ernest Hemingway,
Ford Mattox Ford, T. S. Eliot, D.
H. Lawrence and Ezra Pound.
Some of the examples given by
Prof. Haugh, who himself teaches
a creative writing course, as to
the results of this education are
Hemingway and Conrad. Almost
all of Hemingway reflects deep
knowledge and sympathy for the

19th century romantic. Conrad's
"Lord Jim" would be unrecogniz-
able if you took "Hamlet" out of it.
Needs Vicariousness
All this leads into Prof. Haugh's
views on the writers "experience."
This experience, according to Prof.
Haugh, often is and should be vi-
carious. "Thousands of people sail-
ed Conrad's south eas. Part of the
reason they didn't write 'Lord Jim'
is they didn't read 'Hamlet' and
have his experiences to draw on.
"In the same way an only child
can often write more sensitively
about large family life because he
is more acutely aware of it. It's
not simply familiar ground to be
accepted as it is."
Markl Shorer once said that
"technique leads to self-discovery."
In Prof. Haugh's view part of the
meaning of this statement is that
technique is not only how to write
but also being led into what to
write.
If a student writes himself into
a corner and can find no way out,
more often than not it is due to a
lack of technique.

away two or three years."
This is not much of a problem
in the physical sciences because
the thesis work is done right in
the laboratory, he said. But, stu-
dents in the humanities ,do not
have to complete their disserta-
tions on campus; many even hold
a job at another college and thus
"stretch out" their degree program
at the University.
"I don't know if this is harm-
ful, but it is certainly more diffi-
cult. We've been trying to speed
up the degrees," Sawyer said.
With an eye on the "terrible
pinch" looming ahead for profes-
sionally-trained personnel, the
graduate school has been using in-
formal methods such as time limits

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and faculty prodding, "and it has
had some effect.
"Last year there were 356 Ph.D.'s
and the year before that 351; pre-
viously, however, the average was
about 276. This is a major change,"
Sawyer said.
He also noted that more schol-
arships for use in the humanities
are starting to come from agen-
cies such as the Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare Department and
the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.
"During the last 10 years, de-
grees have increased more rapidly
in the humanities than in the sci-
ences," Sawyer pointed out.
Statistics for 'U'
In fact, the University is pro-
ducing more humanities doctorates
than sciences. According to statis-
tics in Dean Bretsch's survey, 36.6
per cent of of 205 Ph.D.'s last
February were in the social sci-
ences, 15.1 in the engineering sci-
ences, 13.2 in the physical sciences,
11.2 in biological sciences, 10.2 in
Arts and area studies, 8.8 in lan-
guages and literature and 4.9 in
health sciences.
This totals up to 55.6 per cent of
the students in areas of humani-
ties, and 44.4 in the sciences.
Nearly three quarters of these
students reported employment
and/or scholarships during "most
semesters" of their degree pro-
grams.
Jobs, Finances Differ
Percentage of employment was
fairly constant among all the stu-
dents (this sample contained only
186 of the 205 graduates), but the
statistics bear out Heyns's state-
ment on scholarships: the science
students virtually dominate this
aspect, in most cases having twice
the percentage held by students in
the humanities.
The mathematical correlation
between the two percentages of
employment and scholarships was
computed, and a uniformly high,
correlation was found between to-
tal hours employed during pro-
grams and the time lapse between
matriculation to doctorate.
A uniformly low correlation was
found between total hours employ-
ed during semesters enrolled and
between the time needed to achieve
the degree.
Implications
These figures "seem to indicate
consistently heavy employment
schedules during semesters not en-
rolled-and, in turn, a further
lengthening of the usual doctoral
program," the survey stated.
In general, "this would suggest
that in contrast with full-time em-
ployment, the part-time employ-
ment of students as teaching fel-
lows, research assistants, etc., does
not significantly or excessively
prolong the period of study."
If these programs are to be
completed more quickly, more two-
year scholarships should be given
out, as "scholarships for one year,
whether students were employed
or not, did not seem to speed up
the completion of a program," the
survey concluded.

The University's new Profession-
al Theatre Program will open its
Fall Festival with the production
of Richard Brinsley Sheridan's
"The School for Scandal" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The comedy of manners, pre-
sented by the Association of Pro-
ducing Artists, will open at 8:30
p.m. Wednesday and run through
Saturday. On Saturday there will
be a special post-football matinee,
followed by a later performance.
Borge Concert..
Victor Borge, renowned concert
pianist turned comedian, will pre-
sent a concert at 8:30 p.m. Fri-
day at Hill Aud. Borge will be
presented under the auspices of
University Bands.
Camus .. .
Preston Roberts of the Univer-
sity of Chicago Divinity School
will discuss "Albert Camus" at 4:15
p.m. Wednesday in Aud. A. The
talk is sponsored by the Office of
Religious Afairs.
Organ Recital...
Anton Heiller, noted Viennese
guest organist, will give a public
concert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Hill Aud. as part of a "Conference
on Organ Music."
The program, devoted to the
music of Johann Sebastian Bach,
will be given in conjunction with
the Conference on Organ Music
tomorrow and Tuesday. Two talks
will be given tomorrow, one on
"Music for the Two-Manual Or-
gan" at 1:30 p.m. and the other
on "Music in Worship" at 3:30
p.m.

Tonight at 7:00 and 9:15
PLACE IN THE SUN,
Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor,
Shelley Winters (Dreiser's American
Tragedy)
ACADEMY AWARD
A RC H ITECT U RE A U DITOR IUM
50 cents

On Tuesday there will be talks
on "Techniques in Organ Playing"
at 10 a.m. and "The Art of Reg-
istration" at 11 a.m. Prof. Mari-
lyn Mason, chairman of the or-
gan department, and Prof. Robert
Glasgow of the music school will;
speak.

s A recital by Kathryn Eskey,
Grad, will lead off the Conference
at 8:30 p.m. today. Heiller will
discuss "The Interpretatiorn of
Bach" at 2 p.m., Tuesday, follow-
ed by a recital at 4:15 p.m. of
Prof. Mason's students. All events
will be in Hill Aud.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

DIAL 5-6290
THE CRYis
'MUTINY!"t

A NEW EXPLOSION
FROM THE MAKER OF
"SINK THE BISMARK"

The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial respon-
sibility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2
p.m. two days preceding publication.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
Day Calendar
1:00 p.m.-Conference on Organ Music
-Hill Aud.; Marilyn Mason,
"Music for the Two-Manual
Organ," 1:30;
Robert Glasgow, "Music in
Worship," 3:30;
Organ Recital: Anton Heil-
ler, Music of Johann Sebas-
tian Bach, 8:30.
8:00 p.m.-University Staff Meeting -
President Hatcher, Annual
Address to Faculty and Staff.
Presentation of Distinguish-
ed Faculty Achievement
Awards,. Distinguished Serv-
ice Awards for Instructors
and Assistant Professors, and
the Henry Russel Award:
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Reception: Michigan League
Ballroom.
General Notices
Woodrow Wilson Fellowships: Nomina-
tions for Woodrow Wilson fellowships
fqr the year 1963-64 for first year grad-
uate study leading to a career in schol-
arship and college teaching are due Oct.
31, 1962. Only members of the faculty
may nominate candidates. Eligible for
nomination are men and women of
outstanding ability who are seniors, or
graduates not now enrolled in a grad
school, or college graduates now in the
armed forces who will be free to enter a
grad school in 1963-64. To give nominees
sufficient time to prepare and submit
the required credentials, faculty mem-
bers are urgedto send in their nomina-
tion as early in October as possible.
Letters of nomination should include
the student's field of concentration, his
local address and phone, and should be
sent to Dean Richard Armitage, Grad
School, the Ohio State Univ., 164 W. 19th
Ave., Columbus 10, Ohio.'
Make-up Examination in Philosophy
269 will be held Thurs., Oct. 4, from 2:00
to 5:00 p.m. in Room 2208 Angel Hall.
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts and Schools of Business Admin.,
Education, Music, Natural Resources,
Nursing, and Public Health: Students
whoreceived marks of I, X, or "no re-
port" at the end of their last semester
or summer session of attendance will
receive a grade of "E" in the course or
courses unless this work is made up.
In the College of Lit., Science and The7
Arts and in the Schools of Music and
Nursing this date is by Oct. 15. In the
Schools of Bus. Admin., Education, Nat-
ural Resources and Public Health, this,
date is by Oct. 17, Students wishing;
an extension of time beyond these dates
should file a petition with the appro-
priate official of their school. In the
School of Nursing, the above Informa-
tion refers to non-Nursing courses only.

Events
Student Government Council Approval
for the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Young Republicans and Students for
Romney, first voter drive, Oct. 1, 2, 3,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fishbowl, Diag.
Guest Organist: Anton Heiller, one of
Europe's most famous organists and
most versatile musicians, will present a
recital on the music of Johann Sebas-
tian Bach on Mon. evening, Oct. 1, 8:30
p.m. in Hill Aud. His recital is open to
the public.
Doctoral Students: Robert Jones, Alex-
ander Boggs Ryan, Edward Tibbs, and
Robert P. Roubos, doctoral students,
will present a recital on Tues., Oct. 2,
4:15 p.m. in Hill Aud. They will play
the music of Scheidt, Olivier Messiaen,
Marcel Dupre, and Julius Reubke. The
recital is open to the public.
Engineering Mechanics Dept. Seminar:
Mon., Oct. 1 at 4:00 p.m. in Room 311
W. Eng. Bldg. Prof. E. F. Masur, Dept.
of Eng. Mechanics, the Univ. of Mich,
will speak on "ArSabbatical in Paris."
Coffee will be served at 3:30 p.m. In
the faculty lounge.
Announcements
The Bureau of Appointments Registra-
tion Meeting will be held on Tues., Oct.
2 for all seniors & grad students who
(Continued on Page 8).
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fall session should register by
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
Cong. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Faith,
Inquiry, Intellect: "In Consideration of
Excerpts from G. B. Shaw's 'A Black Girl
in Search of God'," Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m.,
802 Monroe.
* * *
Gamma Delta (Lutheran Student
Group), Concordia Cornerstone Laying,
2 p.m.; Supper, 6:15 p.m.; Sept. 30, 1511
Washtenaw.
* * *
Graduate Outing Club, Search for lost
airplane, Sept. 30, 2 p.m., Rackham
Bldg., Huron St. Entrance.
* * *
Lutheran Student Assoc., "For the
Life of the World: A Review of the 1962
Ashram," Sept. 30, 7 p.m., Lutheran
Student Center, Hill & Forest.
* * *
Newman Club, Picnic, 2 p.m., Recep-
tion for Msgr. Bradley, 7-9 p.m.; Sept.
30, Newman Center, 331 Thompson.
* * *
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Regular Meet-
ing, Dancing, Instruction, Oct. 2, 7:30
p.m., 1429 Hill.
* C**
India Students' Assoc., Mahatma
Gandhi's Birthday Celebration, Lecture
by Dr. Sreenivasachar (Visiting Prof. of
History) ,Films on the Life of Mahatma
Gandhi, Refreshments, Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m.,
Union, Rms. 3R-S. All welcome.

I

.

GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE!
FRI. & SAT. NIGHT-SAT. & SUN* MATINEE

THE UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Proudly Presents...

A PAE
{ASSOCIATION OF PRODUCING ARTJSTS)
IN"
by RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN
Directed By
Ellis Rabb
OPENS
WED. EVE. .
Ae--r
NEW YORKER
fY No IdOS VARIETY

v

aiic cou
DIRKBOGARDE
ANThONY QJJAYE

CAST
Tucker Ashworth
Clayton Corzatte
Keene Curtis
Will Geer
Rosemary Harris
David Hooks
Cavada Humphrey
Page Johnson
Enid Markey
Anne Meacham
Ellis Rabb
Richard Woods

with shows
Continuous from 1 P.M.
at 1, 3, 5. 7, 9, P.M.

l

See the

LIMELITERS

"' prawrM

DIAL 2-6264
IU101it1 uauam
11mtiHa imiill
1159 w1i
nan t 1iItiitl ,I lu utuu
Illm+

STARTING TODAY
Complete Shows at
1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00 - 7:05 and 9:10
Feature starts 15 minutes later
- 9

OCTOBER 3-7
M ENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Open 11 A.M. Daily-Beginning Tomorrow
perfs: Wed.-Fri.8:30, Sat.6&9p.m., Sun.3p.m. phone resvs: 668-6300

F

.:
;,

Presented by Assembly Association, Alpha Phi Omega,
and the Folklore Society
Sunday, October 14, 1962
-8:00 p.m.-
HILL AUDITORIUM

TONIGHT
8:00 P.M. UNION BALLROOM
"Theatre at Michigan"
A Panel featuring
Dr. Warner G. Rice on George M. Cohan's "The Tavern"
Dr. Otto Graf on Ibsen's "Ghosts"

11

TICKETS: $3.50-$2.50-$1.50

I

For Advance Tickets, Mail Check or Money Order to:
Limeliters Concert,

St dent Activities Bldg. ;Ann Arbor*

11

INl

I

I

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