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September 28, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-28

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T, SEPTEMBER 28,1962/

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGiET EE

V, SEPTEMBER ~8, 19O~,' THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

... _.s........

M

New

Yemen King

Overthrown,

rs
world News Roundup

Assassinated in Army Rebellion

NATO Girds
A ainst New
Berlin Crisis
COPENHAGEN (P) - PresidentI
John F. Kennedy's adviser on in-
ternational security said yesterday
the West is braced for possible new
Soviet threats to Berlin this win-
ter.
McGeorge Bundy told the North1
Atlantic T r e a t y Organization
",West Berlin is bound to us all by
a thousand ties of feeling" and
declared:
"We must and shall keep it as
it is, until the day when good
sense m'ay outweigh greed in the
Soviet Union."
Bundy, coining here direct from
a visit to Berlin, denounced what
he called the "sordid inhumanity"
of the Red Wall dividing that city.
The Western allies, he declared,
must stand firm "until the day
when Soviet policy may come to
reflect what all honest and well-
informed Russians themselves un-
derstand." And that is, he said,
"the whole dirty failure of the
Eastern zone of Germany."
Bundy warned "this may be a
winter of renewed Soviet threats
to Berlin," but asserted: "we in
the Atlantic Community are clear
and firm and ever more ready-
and we could not have a better
cause."
The United States, he said,
frowned on independent national
atomic forces by NATO members,
but would welcome a joint United
States-European deterrent within
NATO.
"We run the risk of seeming to
interfere, whether we speak or
keep silent," the key White House
adviser said.
Some observers said this was
believed to be the first time that
the United States had publicly
thrown its weight behind an in-
tegrated U.S. - European nuclear
force. They speculated that Bun-
dy's speech might signal the be-
ginning of an American attempt
to make NATO a nuclear power.

HOME RAPS BERLIN WALL:
Asks UN To Pressure USSR

UNITED NATIONS ( '-British
Foreign Secretary Lord David
Home urged the United Nations
General Assembly yesterday to put
pressure on the Soviet Union to
halt tensions on the Berlin Wall.
He called the wall "an almost
intolerable provocation to civilized
people."
He expressed hope the Assem-
bly would make clear to the Soviet
Union it must stop "artificially
creating crises" in the divided city,
and negotiate a settlement with,
the West "which pays due regard
to the rights and interests of all
parties."
Complete Accord
He made the statements in a
major policy speech to the 108-
nation Assembly. Adlai E. Steven-
son, chief United States delegate,
commented outside the Assembly
hall that the speech expressed a

viewpoint with which the United
States "is in complete accord."
The Assembly also heard a dec-
laration from Cambodian Foreign
Minister Huot Sambath that his
country would turn to the Soviet
Union and Communist China for
help if necessary against any at-
tack by pro-Western Thailand and
South Viet Nam.
He criticized the United States
for sending military aid to Cam-
bodia's two neighbors. He declar-
ed the choice is clear-to remain
neutral or if survival is at stake
to become a satellite of the East-
ern bloc. He said Cuba was an ex-
ample of how little nations, faced
with despair, know how to make
grave decisions "in order not to
disappear from being."
Self-Determination
The British foreign secretary
declared that the only permanent

Postage Rates, Drug Laws
See New Action in Congress

solution for Berlin lies "in the con-
text of self-determination for Ger-
many. If this Assembly is true to
itself it will insist that this prin-
ciple is accepted for East Germany
as well as the West."
But he added that because as
of now "Russian preaches self-de-
termination for everyone else but
will not allow it in East Germany,
the only thing we can do is to seek
a modus vivendi."
He stressed that the Western al-
lies could not accept a settlement
"which would merely provide a
cloak for a Communist takeover."
He appealed for all to support
conciliation as a method for
averting the danger of nuclear
war.
He said the first and foremost
danger of conflict is "the Com-
munist effort to impose their sys-
tem on the rest of the world by
that type of political warfare they
call peaceful coexistence."
He made only a passing refer-
ence to Cuba. He recalled that
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko in dealing with U.S.
policy toward Cuba asked if a
stronger state has the right to
gobble up a weaker one.
On U.N. financing he said the
Assembly should support t h e
World Court opinion saying all
members should shoulder the cost
of peace-making operations. He
declared the Assembly must spell
out to all that "Those who fall in
arrears for two years will forfeit
their vote, as is laid down in the
rules of the charter."
Anti guerrilla
Force Planned
WASHINGTON (iP) - The De-
fense Department has given the
army a go-ahead for a one-third
boost in its antiguerrilla forces
over the next five years - to 6,639
men, Deputy Secretary of Defense
Roswell L. Gilpatric said yester-
day.
His remarks indicated that the
whole question of guerrilla war-
fare and tactical air support is.
being reviewed.

Royal Palace
Reportedly
Demolished
UN Delegate Readies
To Assume Command
ADEN (R) - Broadcasts last
night from the feudal Arab king-
dom of Yemen reported the 35-
year-old monarch enthroned last
week was besieged in his palace
and assassinated by a military fac-
tion, and a "free republic" was
proclaimed.
The reports said the royal pal-
ace at San'a, the capital, was de-
stroyed by artillery fire Wednes-
day night and the king's body was
buried under its debris.
Some doubts were cast on these
reports from other sources and the
possibility was raised that a re-
bellious group had seized the ra-
dio at San'a without gaining much
further immediate power. There
appeared to be no doubt, however,
that a coup had been carried out.
There was no direct word from
supporters of the left-leaning king,
Imam Mohammed Al-Badr.
The tiny Red Sea kingdom in
recent years had become a pawn
in the cross-conflicts of the Arab
world, Nasserism and the Soviet
camp.
The intrigue reached quickly as
far as New York where the head
of the Yemeni delegation of the
United Nations, a dynastic prince,
said he was leaving for home im-
mediately.
He is Prince Saif Al-Islam Al-
Hassan, brother of the Imam Ah-
med who died last week in Yemen
and was succeeded by his son.
Prince Hassan, who some Yemen
sources call the rightful successor
to the throne Badr took, said the
army faction reported in control
was not representative of the
people.
Prince Hassan said he would
contact people there.
Asked if he planned to make a
direct bid for power, he answered:
"I could not say; I would like to
get a clearer picture and upon
this I will base my further ac-
tions."
He said the group that had
taken over his country was but a
small faction in the army. Asked
if they were representative of his
people's wishes, he answered, "On
the contrary, they are anything
but."

By The Associated Press
ALGIERS - Premier Ahmed
Ben Bella said yesterday he will
fly to New York immediately after
the National Assembly approves
his cabinet. He told newsmen he
wants to head the Algerian dele-
gation when the new African re-
public is formally admitted to the
United Nations. Algeria is expected
to apply for membership in the
UN this week. No opposition has
been sighted.
GENEVA --- Western nuclear
spokesmen accused the Soviet Un-
ion yesterday of repudiating its
promise proposal for banning nu-
agreement to a neutralist com-
clear weapsons tests. United States
Ambassador Charles C. Stelle and
Peter Smithers of Britain charged
in a meeting of the nuclear test
ban subcommittee that the Soviet
government has begun to back
away from the neutralist formula
which it accepted as the sole basis
for test ban negotiations with the
two Western nations.
WHEELING - President John
F. Kennedy teed off on Republi-
cans last night as obstructionists
and urged cheering West Virgin-
ians to vote Democratic in No-
vember to keep their country mov-
ing ahead in coming days of peril
and promise.
WASHINGTON - President
John F. Kennedy signed with sig-
nal satisfaction yesterday his
much-buffeted farm bill and ex-
pressed confidence it "will help
us sustain prosperity, reduce bur-
dens of surpluses and maintain
stable food prices."
WASHINGTON - Gen. Lyman
L. Lemnitzer. in his farewell

speech as chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, said last night a
single, over-all military chief
could lead to military autocracy.
"There is no room in a democratic
form of government such as ours
for a military autocracy."
OTTAWA () - Prime Minister
J o h n Diefenbaker's politically
weakened government today un-
veiled a program designed to bal-
ance the federal budget.
The measures were outlined in
the traditional speech from the
Throne, a general statement of
proposed legislation, at the open-
ing session of the nation's 25th
Parliament.
The message was devoted large-
ly to measures for strengthening
the Canadian economy.
It reflected what political lead-
ers have described as the serious
economic and financial crisis that
had overtaken the country.

Phone

I

--Enclose check or money order--
For Advance Tickets, Mail Check
or Money Order to:
Limeliters Concert,
Student Activities Bldg., Ann Arbor

a - a a a S S S S S S S a

1(

GRAD
FRIDAY, SEPT. 28, '62
9-12 p.m. VFW
ARDEN MIESEN'S BAND
$1.00 per person
Sponsored by the Graduate Student Council.

LIMEITERS
Sunday,
October 14, 1962
Hill Auditorium
-8:00 p.m. -
TICKETS:
$3.50--$2.50-$1.50
LIMELITERS CONCERT
Gentlemen:
Swantm tickets at $. each
Address
Name

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Postal rates,
foreign aid, and drug laws all saw
positive action yesterday, as both
House and Senate pressed toward
their adjournment deadline.
The Senate rejected charges of
pre-election vote-buying and vot-
ed 72-3 to give 1.6 million govern-
ment workers an immediate pay
raise.
The same bill, which goes back
to the House, a $603 million-a-
year increase in postal rates start-
ing next Jan. 7. If accepted by the
House, the new rates would raise
letter mail from 4 cents to 5 cents,
air mail from 7 cents to 8 cents,
and increase other postal rates.
The House had previously passed
a similar postal rate bill which did
not deal with federal pay.
The House passed by a voice vote
a bill-similar to a Senate meas-
ure-to tighten federal control

over the manufacture and sale of
drugs.
A resounding voice vote killed
an attempt to knock out a re-
quirement that drug makers in-
clude in theirmedical journal ad-
vertisements the possible bad side
effects of drugs along with the
beneficial ones. But after some ar-
gument it was decided that the
side effects in the ads could be
told "in brief summary" rather
than detail.
The Senate and House must set
up a conference committee to ad-
just the differing language in the
bills unless the Senate accepts the
House version.
The Senate Appropriations Com-
mittee approved the foreign aid
money bill after voting to restore
$792.4 million of a $1.35 billion
cut out by the House.
This raised the total of the bill
to $4.4 billion.
The bill now goes to the Senate
where it will be taken up for floor
action Monday.

I

- - - - -

i
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ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE

CURTAIN TIME
8 P.M.

TONIGHT!

"A HAPPY, GO-SEXY,
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Directed by Y
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By Lawrence
Box Office Season Tickets Still
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Irthe
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HEATI

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COLUMBIA RECORDS
REDUCED TO BRING YOU SAVINGS OF
OFF
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SONGS
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and
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SING YOUR FAVORITE
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Remember the picture above? It flashed across your
television screen on a hot night last July. Perhaps
you remember that it originated from France. And
that it reached the U. S. via Telstar, the world's first
private enterprise communications satellite.
Since that summer night, the Bell System's Telstar
has relayed electronic signals of many types-tele-
vision broadcasts, telephone calls, news photographs,
and others.
But there's one Telstar reflection you might have
missed. Look into the faces of the Bell System people
below and you'll see it. It is the reflection of Telstar's

Reflections of Telstar

success that glowed brightly on the faces of all who
shared in the project.
Their engineering, administrative and operations
skills created Telstar and are bringing its benefits
down out of the clouds to your living room.
These Bell System people, through their talented,
dedicated efforts, make your phone service still better,
more economical, and more useful.
The reflections of Telstar are many.
Y PBell Telephone Companies

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MONAURAL AND STEREO
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The certainty as to whether Everest records will
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There are many collectors items on this already
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based on a first come first served basis only while
they last.
-rA nrIk

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