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September 26, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 26, 196

GE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ROMNEY, SWAINSON:
Stockmeyer Discusses
Gubernatorial Campaign
By DONNA ROBINSON IEr

The most unfortunate aspect of
this year's gubernatorial election
campaign is that most of the at-
tention is focused on Republican
candidate George Romney, Steven
Stockmeyer, '63, observed Monday
at a meeting of the Students for
Romney Club,
Not only is Romney getting most
of the press coverage, but even his
opponent, Democratic Governor
John Swainson, spends x1 of his
time attempting to discredit Rom-
ney, rather than giving his own
qualifications for the office, he
said.
This emphasis, Stockmeyer be-
lieves, shows that Swainson is
"running scared" and that he
knows he has "a formidable and
possibly successful opponent."
He said that Swainson is "try-
ing to pick out any little thing
he can find, and twist it" against
Romney.
One of the items now being used
against Romney is his statement
during his campaign for delegate
to the Constitutional Convention
that the convention should not
be used as a "stepping-stone" to
other offices.
Romney has since stated that
if he had known at the time he
would be running for governor he
would not have run for Con-Con
delegate. When he did decide to
try for the governorship, he re-
frained from any campaigning
until after the convention was
over, Stockmeyer said.
On the other-hand, he charged
that Swainson himself used the
Senate as a steppingstone to the
Lieutenant Governor's office, and,
after he became Lieutenant Gov-
ernor, "spent most of his time
rounding upsupport for his at-
tempt to succeed Soapy (Former
Gov. G. Mennen) Williams."
Democrats have also charged
that the Republicans are against
higher education, because the "Re-

Periodical
To Recruit
At Meetincg
A mass meeting for all students
interested in working on "Gar-
goyle," the University humor mag-
azine, will be held today at 7:30
p.m. in the Student Publications
Building.
Some confusion has arisen
around the Gargoyle since two
groups are attempting independ-
ently to revive the currently dor-
mant magazine. Tomorrow night's
meeting witlbe conducted by
would-be editors Richard Pollin-
ger, '65M, Robert Israel, '64, and
Norma Wikler, '64N.
"I understand that the other
group refuses to collaborate with
us," Pollinger said, "and that is
certainly an unfortunate thing
since any such split naturally
weakens the attempt to revive the
Garg."
Music Society
Changes Ballet
The University Musical Society
has announced that the San Fran-
cisco Ballet Company has been
engaged for March 22 in Hill Aud.
to fill the vacancy due to the can-
cellation of the Tokyo Ballet.
The Tokyo Ballet was originally
scheduled to appear early next
March on the Choral Union Ser-
ies. Tickets held for the Tokyo
Ballet will be honored for the San
Francisco Ballet.

that the whole thing boils down
to the fact that the Regents don't
understand Communism--or they
wouldn't have allowed Commun-
ists to speak here in the first place
last May," she said.
Miss Byerlein compared a Com-
munist speaker to a criminal, al-
luding that no university would
permit a criminal to talk about
the glories of crime. Similarly, she
said, the University should not let
To Organize
India Seminar
As part of an exchange program
to be conducted with an Indian
university next August, the edu-
cation school beginning this week
is offering a seminar on "Society
and Education in India."
Prof. Puttaparti Sreenivasha-
char, chairman of the history de-
partment at Osmania University
in India, will head the seminar,
which will meet every Thursday
from noon to 2 p.m. in the edu-
cation school cafeteria.
Faculty members and graduate
students are invited to attend.
The reciprocal exchange pro-
gram itself will send one educa-
tion professor and from one to
three graduate students to the In-
dian university, which is yet to be
announced.
The seminar will coordinate
training and research in Indian
education.

munist propagandize.
She added that "certainly a
Communist is a criminal. The
University wouldn't have permit-
ted a Nazi to speak on campus 20
years ago, and it's no different
with a Communist today."
Too Easy
Speaking on the "liberality" of
the proposed changes in Regents
By-law 8.11, Miss Byerlein said she
felt it would be entirely too easy
for "a Communist to get around
the policy."
She added that she was certain
the state Legislature felt the way
she does since "it passed a resolu-
tion last year saying that no tax-
supported college orhuniversity
would be allowed to have a Com-
munist speak on campus,
"There is always the possibility
that if this policy, of allowing
Reds to use the campus, goes
through, the University will re-
ceive no appropriations next year,"
she said.
No Corruption
She added that she was not con-
cerned that a Communist would
corrupt students - "I have com-
plete faith in the rational powers
of intelligent people,"-but noted
that her chief concern was that
an appearance by a Communist
speaker on this campus would tend
to improve the image of the aver-
age Communist in America today.
"I don't think we should have
recognized Russia in 1933 - but
since that has already happened,
it's time to realize we are at war,
and start acting accordingly. They
are our enemies, not our equals,
and should be treated as such.

said.

I

Urge Resignation
Miss Byerlein indicated that, if
a Communist were to be permitted
to speak here, she would not urge
University President Harlan
Hatcher to resign from his post,
nor would she advocate that he
be removed from the presidency.
"But, it's a risk he would have to
take from the people of the state,"
she said.
"The public has been more and
more alerted -- due greatly to the
recent situation at Wayne State
University, and every day it's get-
ting more and more burned up..
"I would suggest that President
Hatcher learn more about Com-
munism. I honestly think he's
naive: in fact, I feel sorry for him.
Perhaps he ought to go back to
school, for, at least on this little
point (of Communism), he hasn't
learned his lesson very well."
Two years ago when the Wayne
State University speaker ban was
removed from the campus, Miss
Byerlein formed a part of the op-
position to the WSU's action.
She was one of the leaders of a
group that circulated petitions to
halt the new WSU policy

Byerlein May Appear To Protest Russian
(continued from Page 1) its facilities be used to let a Com- "I do my part in this war," she

SOPH SHOW
MASS MEETING
for cast, committee, orchestra
Thursday, Sept. 27
League Ballroom-7:30 P.M.

Dial
2-6264

ENDING TODAY A
JEFFREY HUNTER
"NO MAN IS
AN ISLAND'

* STARTING THURSDAY A

w in T o uCin* S
OF ENOMIOS
AD DIN DE L.AURENTIIS PRODUIEONN
A COUMBI PITURE RELASETGI

LIMELITERS

STEVEN STOCKMEYER
... discusses Romney
publican-dominated" State Legis-
lature has refused to allow Michi-
gan's institutions- of higher learn-
ing the appropriations they re-
quested. Two years ago, Stock-
meyer said, when all of the insti-
tutions received much less than
they had requested, a group of Re-
publicans in the Senate attempted
to havedthe appropriationsre-
considered. But Swainson "had
made political hay out of the
issue" and would not release the
Democrats to reconsider it.
The Democrats blamed Repub-
licans further for not taking ad-
vantage of federal money which
could be appropriated for various
programs in Michigan.
They failed to mention that
most of this money carries with
it riders that are unacceptable to
many Michigan residents, and
some must be matched by equal
or nearly equal funds from the
state, Stockmeyer said.
In answering Gov. Swainson's
criticisms of Romney's leadership
because he did not, as a private
citizen, attempt to influence the
legislature toward a better tax
plan last spring, Stockmeyer asked
why Swainson, as Governor, did
not exert his influence for a bet-
ter constitution, instead of merely
criticizing the finished product
after the convention was over.
To Conduct
Law Exams
The Law School Admission Test,
commonly called the 'Law Apti-
tude Test,' will be given Nov. 10,
1962, and Feb. 9, April 20 and
Aug. 3, 1963.:
The test, which is required of
applicants for most American law
schools, is prepared and adminis-
tered by the Educational Testing
Service. It consists of verbal ap-
titude tests and tests of reason-
ing ability. The second portion of
the exam deals with writing abil-
ity and "other general back-
ground."
A Bulletin of Information, avail-
able from the testing service, con-
tains information on registration
and sample questions. Students
can also contact Prof. Lionel H.
Laing of the political science de-
partment in the Junior-Senior
Counselling Office for further in-
formation.
Hear Dr. Warner Rice,
Chairman English Dept.,
speak on
GEORGE M. COHEN'S
"THE TAVERN."
Sunday, Sept. 30
8:00 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

Soop Views Emerging Educational Needs

(Continued from Page 1)

Sunday,
October 14, 1962
Hill Auditorium
-8:00 p.m. -
TICKETS:
$3.50-$2.50-$1.50
LIMELITERS CONCERT
Gentlemen:
I want - tickets at $ each
Address
Name

Soop is chairman) is promoting
greater integration of" extension
services.
Voluntary
But such cooperation is volun-
tary, and not enforced; each in-
stitution still can serve local needs
in any way it sees fit.
Whether revisions in the semes-
ter system of colleges will incur/a
broadening of the council's func-
tions remains to be seen.
The increased student enroll-
ments that brought about the
year-round plans constitute a sec-
ond consideration for Extension
Service re-examination.
Major changes, Soop says, have'
come in the type of student com-
prising the bulk of the increase:
heavily research-oriented gradu-
ate students, more stringent yet
more diversified kinds of educa-
tion school curricula.
Revamp Courses
These revisions, he explains,
bring about a corresponding re-
vamping of Extension Service
courses, which mostly parallel
courses given at the University.
In addition, he predicts a greater
number of students taking these
courses through Extension Service,
as coordination and cooperation
of universities' curricula increase.
For the most part, faculty men
are asked through their depart-
ment chairmen to teach extension
service courses; the instructors re-
ceive an additional stipend. The
departments control course con-
tent.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fall session should register by
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
Chess Club, Meeting, Sept. 26, 7:30.
p.m., Union, Rms. 3K-L. Non-players
taught; everyone welcome.
Christian Science Org., Weekly Meet-
ing, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m., 528 SAB.
German Club, Coffee Hour, Sept. 26,
3-5 p.m., 4072 Frieze Bldg. German Con-
versation, Music, Singing. Herzlich will-
komen !
Wesley Foundation Graduate, Group,
Supper and Seminar, Sept. 26, 6 p.m.,
Pine Room.

But if faculty cannot be found,
then the extension courses are not
offered. And with heavier and
heavier class loads to handle, Soop
says, there may be a problem in
the future in recruiting instruc-
tors.
Discuss Problem
He and other Extension Service
officials intend to discuss this
problem with faculty members in
order to probe possible solutions if
the situation becomes acute.
The Extension Service also fur-
nishes a broadening outlet for fac-
ulty participation, Soop believes.
A faculty man is provided an op-
portunity to teach a course out-
side his regular assignment-or,
in case the instructor ranks low
in his department's seniority list,
he may be given his first chance
to teach in his preferred area of
academic specialization.
A third factor Soop pinpointed
as an area of study for the Exten-
sion Service is the proliferation of.
community colleges. These insti-
tutions are able to absorb parts of
the University's field programs, if
the local needs can be served bet-
ter by resources of the local col-
lege.
Besides creating the problem of
coordinating University efforts
Dial 8-6416

aa' aa-aar f~ 1 v . . ___________________________
.. " , * Don't fiddle around paying
those hills. Stop in at either of
Ann Arbor Bank's campus offices
and open your special checking
--- account. There's no minimum
balance and twenty checks cost
just $2.00.

with the offerings of the new com-
munity colleges, the Extension
Service also may have to realign
its programs to meet the demands
of less urbanized sectors, Soop
says, for the new two-year schools
usually are found near concentra-
tions of population.
This in turn affects the methods
by which the service carries 'in-
struction to rural districts. Small
towns "which often need educa-
tion programs the most" do not
possess the population to make
such services financially feasible.
So, in contrast to the wide va-
riety of courses the University can
set up in densely-populated areas,
rural counties sometimes cannot
be given classes with the range or
concentration both the Extension
Service and the rural peoples
might wish to see.
In lieu of the personal contact
between instructor and student,
indirect forms such as correspond-
ence courses or, perhaps in the
future, a state-wide television net-
work are likely to be used for
sparsely-settled areas.

On Sale Now ...

Thru Friday,

Sept. 28

I

1-4... Michigan League Lobby

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS THURSDAY
"A TRIUMPH! IN A CLASS
BY ITSELF!"
N. Y. Daily News

CULTURAL

I

ACTIVITIE S

ENDING THURSDAY

I

TICKET

"a unique opportunity to experience the arts at Michigan"
YOUR CHOICE in each of 9 eategories of
outstanding cultural events.
ALSO: Exchange C.A.T.'s for individual tickets
thru Tuesday, October 2

Phone

I

-Enclose check or money order---
For Advance Tickets, Mail Check
or Money Order to;
Limeliters Concert,
Student Activities Bldg., Ann Arbor

AN ASTOR RELEASE OM ONLY
FRTURyADULTS
FRIDAY-

the
Ufrin Ie A FLASK OF
INTENSELY
PERSONAL
wo &eA DRAMA!
STARRING ANNE BANCROFT
AND INTRODUCING PATTY DUKE
FRIDAY
ALEC
GUINNESS
IN
"DAMN THE
DEFIANT"

-

"A TASTE
of
HONEY"/

.1

BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN!

PETITIONING OPEN for

f4

Single Tickets On Sale For
the APA in

S.G.C. Standing Committees

ANN ARBOR (IVIC THEATRE
OPENING THIS WEEK!

Committee on the National Student Assn.
One seat

presented by
U-M PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

THURSDAY, FRI
81

DAY, SATURDAY
P o wwc. Roma

Committee on Student Concerns
Three seats
Committee on Student Activities
Two Seats

4

11

directed by
TED HEUSEL

Petitions will be available
from the Administrative Secretary,
1546 Student Activities Building
on Monday Sept. 24.

4
I

Tickets Also On Sale for the 4 Other Productions of theI

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