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September 21, 1962 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-21

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1982

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

... - ....

PAGE THREE!W

Senate Cautions

Cuba,,

Soviets

1

HILLECS
SUNDAY SUPPER CLUB

Against Renewed Arms Buildup

(Serving Kosher Delicatessen)
Resumes this Sunday, September 23,at 6 P.M.
and continues weekly

Members 75c
1429 Hill Street

Others $1

Tel. 663-4129

Red China
Offers Cuba
'Full Support'
HAVANA (P)-Communist China
has pledged its full support to
Prime Minister Fidel Castro's con-
demnation of "United States im-
perialism."
A Peiping note sent Sept. 17 and
made public yesterday' said the
Cuban people "will forever enjoy
the all-out support of the 650 mil-
lion fraternal Chinese people."
(As quoted by Havana radio,
monitored in Key West, Fla., the
note did not say whether "full
support" would extend to armed
assistance in the event of an at-
tack on Cuba.)
"The Chinese government has
a profound conviction that under
the just and firm direction of
Prime Minister Fidel Castro, unit-
ed as one man and guided by hate
against one enemy, the, Cuban
people . .. can surely squash any
new aggression and intervention
of North American imperialism,"
the note said.
Radio Peiping, in a broadcast re-
corded in Tokyo, said the message
was in reply to a Cuban note of
Sept. 3. Castro's statement on
"United States imperialism" was
issued Aug. 31.
It said United States moves to
call up reservists and its diplo-
matic activities in the Organiza-
tion of American States show that
the United States "is frantically
preparing a new military aggres-
sion against Cuba.'
Report Increases
In Russian Aid
WASHINGTON (A) - United
States officials reported yesterday
that between 65 and 75 Soviet
ships have arrived at Cuban ports
since late July with cargoes in-
cluding military equipment and
persqnnel. The total number of So-
viet ilitary personnel in Cuba is
now put at 4,200.

TANKS NEAR BUENOS AIRES:
ArgentineForces Clash

BUENOS AIRES (P) -- A rebel
tank column rumbling toward
Buenos Aires clashed with govern-
ment artillery forces near La Plata
yesterday in the first bloodshed of
Argentina's newest crisis.
The loyal military command in
Buenos Aires said three rebel tanks
were destroyed in the artillery
bombardment of about 50 Sher-
man tanks in a suburb of La Plata,
about 50 road miles from here.
But the newspaper El Dia of La
Plata reported by telephone to
Buenos Aires that it had learned
the tank column broke through
the artillery barrage on its move
toward this capital. The news-
paper added that several casual-
ties had been taken to La Plata's
Italian hospital which the rebels
had converted into a field hospital.

It was not known whether the
tank column had been under or-
ders to enter the federal capital
or to reinforce the powerful mech-
anized cavalry-led rebel headquar-
ters of Gen. Juan Carlos Ongania
at Campo De Mayo outside Buenos
Aires.
First announcement of the first
major battle of the rebellion came
from Col. Roberto Guerin at head-
quarters of the government's re-
pression command here. It said
the attack on the tank column
was made at the La Plata suburb
of Olmos on the road to Bueons
Aires.
Rebel forces opened fire first
and government artillery returned
it, the announcement said.
News dispatches from the battle

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Outlaws Political Group;
e Gule Asks Election
By The Associated Press
SOUTHERN RHODESIA-Prime Minister Sir Edgar Whitehead's
government yesterday outlawed the African Nationalist People's Union
and arrested some of its leaders. Fresh troops were called to deal with
a wave of violence sweeping the white-ruled country. Whitehead is-
sued a white paper blasting the Nationalist Union, headed by Joshua
Nkomo, as a fascist and neo-Communist organization whose "hooli-
gan youth" intimidated Africans, bombed homes of Caucasians and
burned churches.
* * * *
PARIS-President Charles de Gaulle formally proposed to the
French natio last night that his successor be elected by popular vote.
De Gaulle said in a radio-television address that the question of
changing the mode of electing the president of the republic will soon
be put on the people in a popular referendum. The president is now
elected by an electoral college grouping members of parliament and
local officials.
* * * 4
DAMASCUS-The government of Premier Khaled El Azen decid-
e dyesterday to dissolve Syria's newly reinstated parliament. Informa-
tion Minister Abdul Halim Kaddour announced the move. It came
only one week after the rightist-dominated 172-man parliament zeac-
"tivated the country's 1930 consti-
tution and overwhelmingly voted
Azem into office as constitutional
l Student Assoc. premier.
ents BELGRADE-The draft of a
new constitution, creating a prime
~ I A ,I.I....h minister under President Josip
o n l M ixture B"oz"Tito,wasplaced before the
Yugoslav Parliament yesterday by
the man who may"get the job. Ed-
vard Kardelj, the scholarly theore-
tician of the Yugoslav Communist
CENTER party, outlined the charter that
may provide Tito-through his
962 choice of prime minister-a chance
96 to indicate his successor.
* * *
P.M. VIENNA-Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg,
head of the United States Atomic
Energy Commission, said yesterday
~ Refreshments the United States plans to send a
manned nuclear space ship to Mars
about 1970. Seaborg told a panel
of scientists at the general con-
ference of the International Atom-
ic Energy Association (IAEA), that
the space ship will carry "a cou-
ple of men to land on Mars for a
one-month exploration and return
them to earth in a one-year trip."
* * *
MOSCOW-Foy D. Kohler, new
United States ambassador to Mos-
-;;->:~" cow, arrived here yesterday with
a planeload of baggage that was
believed to include a special mes-
sage from President John F. Ken-
nedy to Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev.

area reported at least a half dozen
casualties on the rebel side.
The press dispatches said the
rebel tank column fought its way
through government a r t il e r y
government artillery reinforce-
school troops and then ran into
ments.
Rebels led by Ongania have ac-
cused an army clique of using
President Jose Guido as a front
man to pave the way for setting
up a military dictatorship in this
key South-American nation. Guido
rejects the charge.
Regime 'Wide Open'
Guido's military-backed regime
has been split wide open by a fight
among the generals for key com-
mand posts almost from the mo-
ment he took over from ousted
President Arturo Frondizi last
March.
The war has been waged mostly
in words.
There were reports that rebel
tankmen clashed with loyalist in-
fantrymen of the 2nd army divi-
sion southeast of the capital, but
these could not be confirmed.
Troops Down Plane
Another report said troops at La
Plata, capital of Buenos Aires
province, shot at a rebel plane
flying low to drop pamphlets.
The war secretariat said a small
rebel convoy headed toward the
capital from the armored base at
Magdalena, about 60 miles south-
east of Buenos Aires, had been
halted and one officer and 36 sol-
diers captured. The communique
made no mention of whether the
rebels put up a fight.
Troops dug trenches, set tank
traps and hastily erected anti-
aircraft guns in the capital and
the suburbs. Government forces in
combat dress took up key positions.
Hundreds of residents around
the rebel stronghold Campo De
Mayo, 10 miles outside Buenos
Aires, packed up and fled in fear
shooting might break out. Gen.
Ongania emerged from his fortress
shortly before noon.
Predicts Vote
To Overrule
Court Charge
WASHINGTON (J') - Chairman
James O. Eastland (D-Mss) pre-
dicted yesterday that his Senate
Judiciary Committee will vote 2-1
against a recommendation that
four major steel companies be cit-
ed for contempt of Congress for
refusal to submit production costs.
Eastland's prediction came as
the committee ended three days
of hearings on the request by an
anti-trust subcommittee headed by
Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn).
He said the vote probably would
come at a closed session Tuesday.
For Kefauver, it was a day of
caustic exchanges with Eastland
and almost constant conflict with
Thomas F. Patton, president of
Republic-Steel Corp., who served
as spokesman for the four steel
firms.
Earlier Eastland had said that
he was "getting tired of sitting
here day after day" while Kefau-
ver questioned Patton.
Kefauver said he still has im-
portant matters to present, but
Eastland said "I've been listening
for this important stuff for three
days, and I haven't heard it come
out yet."

Call Situation
'Dangerous'
To Security
Expect House To Give
Quick Agreement
WASHINGTON (M)-The Senate
voted yesterday to serve clear no-
tice on the Kremlin that the Unit-
ed States will fight to prevent Cu-
ba from being turned into a mili-
tary threat to any of its neighbors.
A resolution warning that any
aggressive buildup "could have the
gravest possible consequences"
was adopted by a vote of 86 to 1
after a three-hour debate.
The lone negative vote was cast
by Sen. Winston L. Prouty (R-
Vt), who said the resolution does
not go far enough.
Report Favorable Attitudes
All of the 13 absent senators
were announced officially as favor-
ing the resolution.
The policy declaration was
drafted by leaders of both poli-
tical parties and is intended as an
expression of United States de-
termination and solidarity by Con-
gress and President John F. Ken-
nedy.
The House debated a companion
resolution approved by its For-
eign Affairs Committee and plan-
ned to speed it to the White House
for Kennedy's endorsement.
Punctuating the congressional
action was a report indicating a
substantial increase in Russian
arms deliveries to Cuba in the last
month.
GOP Protests
Some other Republicans, includ-
ing Sens. Carl T. Curtis (R-Neb)
and Jack Miller (R-Iowa) protest-
ed that the resolution is not strong
enough but they did not join Prou-
ty in voting -against it.
Sen. John Sparkman (D-Ala),
acting chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, appealed for
a show of unanimity. He urged
that members having doubts as to
whether the resolution goes too
far or not far enough "resolve.
their doubts in favor of speaking
with one voice."''
Sparkman said the declaration
is designed to "strengthen the hand
of the President in his stated de-
termination to take whatever ac-
tion may be necessary to protect
the security of the United States
and its allies."
Prouty objected that it "does not
even face up to the Cuban prob-
lem" and Miller said it "falls far
short of meeting the situation."
Curtis called for a "pacific block-
ade" but Sen. John Sherman Coop-
er (R-Ky) said "a blockade is an
act of war."

Bridge Supplies

Tallies

Score Cards

AHMED BEN BELLA
.,peoples' choice

PLAYING CARDS (Congress and Kern)

Voters .Back
RBeli aBloc
ALGIERS (A) - A substantial
majority of Algerian voters yes-
terday approved Ahmed Ben Bel-
la's 196 unopposed candidates for
Algeria's first National Assembly.
The massive turnout in the "yes
only" election was a clear endorse-
ment for the strongman and the
political bureau he expects to bring
stability to the troubled nation.
Official results were not yet
available. Two hours before the
polls closed, preliminary figures
showed that at least 60 per cent
of registered voters cast their bal-
lot for Ben Bella's list.
The only way to register opposi-
tion to Ben Bella was to abstain
from the voting.
Men and women stood in line
for hours outside polling stations
in predominantly Moslem districts.
Closing of the polls had to be put
back by two hours since officials
were unable to keep up with the
rush.
In the European districts of Al-
giers, voting picked up after a
slow start. By late afternoon, Eu-
ropeans also stood in line waiting
for their turn to vote.
Asks UN Members
To Share Expense
UNITED NATIONS (M)-Adlai
E. Stevenson demanded yesterday
that the General Assembly act to
compel members to share all costs
and keep the United Nations from
acting like "a beggar in the
street." The chief United States
delegate made the request in a
major policy speech.

Since
1908

MORRI LL'S
314 South State Street

Phone NO
5-9141

1 M
1 U
WELCOME STUDENTS!!R
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We have, as usual, a large assortment in FINE
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Come in and Browse. BRING THIS AD and your
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mm.......................... m..................m .m

Place Cards

The Internationa
pres

The Internati
in 1416
FRIENDS
Sept. 2 2
- 8:30

BEN'S IN LOVE
Ben Jonson loves "Bartholomew
Fair"
Ben Jonson loves O'Brien
and James
O'Brien and James love
Musket
Musket loves you-Come to
Mass
Meeting and see how much
Sunday night-Union Ball-
room-7:30

Games

Dances

CARDS

OF

ADMISSION

See

LIMEL

rT

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
OPENING 33rd SEASON
NEXT WEEK-SEPT. 27-28-29

Presented by Assembly Association, Alpha Phi Omega,
and the Folklore Society
Sunday, October 14, 1962
-8:00 p.m. -
HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $1.50-$2.50-$3.50
For Advance Tickets, Mail Check or Money Order to:

Directed by Ted Heusel
"A happy-go-sexy,.
funfilled show!"
Unider the
By Law""Rom-'
Thursday-$1.50
Friday-Saturday-$1.75

i \ ,
J /
8 P.M.

FREE OF CHARGE TO ALL
U. of M. STUDENTS
of the
REFORM JEWISH FAITH
for use at the
HIGH HOLY DAY
SERVICES
at
TEMPLE BETH EL
8801 WOODWARD at GLADSTONE.
DETROIT
Phone: TRINITY 5-8530
ROSH HASHONO SERVICES
Friday Evening, Sept. 28 ..... .,.... 7 P.M.
Saturday Morning, Sept. 29 .............. 10 A.M.
YOM KIPPUR SERVICES
Sunday Evening, Oct. 7 . . . . ... . 7 P.M.
Monday, Oct. 8, Day-long, beginning ... 10 A.M.
Students who wish to worship at Temple Beth El on
the High Holy Days are cordially invited to write
for cards of admission. Home hospitality will also
be provided upon request. Please direct your in-

\w
On this campus, you need never get
caught short of clean, presentable
clothing. Kwik 'n Kleen-located on
campus since 1947-has the facilities
and trained experts to handle every
detail of your wardrobe care, on a
moment's notice. Professional dry
cleaning, expert shirt and blouse fm-
ishing, highly skilled alterations and
repairs, wash pants and lab coat care;
all these services and more (in addi-
tion to 22 brand new Frigidaire coin-
operated washers)! And every Kwik
'n Kleen service is guaranteed the
fastest. Try us
open evenings

Box Office Opens Monday (10 a.m.-5 p.m.)
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Truman Capote's
e!- - Al a "TUE IAC LHADD"

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