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September 18, 1962 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1962

PAGE SIX TIlE MICIIId~4N li/lilY TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER, IA. 19~2

iVi-. V.FaLi AT Y..l i1i .i i'l1Ti VU av 1V iV Vr.i

KNOCK ON WOOD!
Wolverines Intact After Practice Game

Major League
Standings
NA TIONAL LEAGUE

//

Re~wooh g&Ross

!?

By MIKE BLOCK
Football Coach Bump Elliott
gave, his players the day off yes-
terdap,, possibly as a reward for
contir.ued improvement, or, at
least, for not getting hurt.
Impossible as it may seem, Mich-
igan's gridders survived the first
fall intva-squad game with but one
relatively harmless injury.
The oinly object lying between
the Miclh igan team and perfect
health wads sophomore fullback Mel
Anthony's sprained ankle. And
even this Impairment doesn't loom
ominously into the future, as An-
Cheerleading Tryouts
The cheei"eaders will prac-
tice today and tomorrow in the
big gym of ti te I-M building at
four o'clock. All interested in
cheerleading .should come at
these times for try-outs.
thony is expected to be back in
shape for practice this week.
The actual outcome of Satur-
day's tiff was pretty much as an-
ticipated, with the combined first
two squads inundating the others,
57-8. Elliott was very pleased with
the team's performance, which was
a considerable improvement over
the rather disappointing showings
of recent outings.
Improvement, however, does not
mean perfection, and Elliott is theJ

first one to admit that there is
much work to be done, "but," he
believes, "the team seems finally
to have gotten into a mood to play
football. The boys blocked and
tackled on Saturday as though
they meant it, and play execution
in general was very sharp."
He noted that currently there is
a real battle being waged among
the team's five (count 'em) quar-
terbacks for the honor of starting
the game at that post in the open-
er against Nebraska.
"Dave Glinka's been our number
one signal caller for the past cou-
ple of years," he admitted, "but,
senior or not, he certainly doesn't
have the job wrapped up yet this
year. Dave's better than ever, but
there are four others barking at
his heels who may be able to top
him."
This includes j u n 1 o r s Bob
Chandler and Frosty Evashevski,
both of whom were highly touted
rookies last year, and both of
whom were subsequently injured,
preventing them from displaying
their full potential. But both are
now among the healthy, and are
out for all they can get.
Rounding out the quartet are
sophomores Bob Timberlake and
Rick Bay. Timberlake, a quarter-
back a la Sonny Gibbs (6'4"), has
been highly touted ever since last
spring both for his running and
his passing, and has in some quar-
ters been described as "the finest

sophomore back in the Big Ten,"I
although that is open to some ques-
tion. Bay, whom Elliott terms "a
terrific fighter," is more of the Ed-
die LeBaron type at 5'9"; he just
may be the darkhorse of the whole
operation.
While there is quantity at the
quarterback slot, things aren't
exactly loaded at the positions in
front of and behind the signal
caller.
"Center is a highly critical posi-
tion on any team," explanied El-
liott, "and it also happens to be
one of our sore spots this year.

With no returning lettermen t
the bill, our probable start
Bill Muir or Jim Green."
Both Muir (200 lbs.) and G
(210 lbs.) are extremely ligh
centers, accentuating the Wo
ines' problem there.
"The fullback position isn't
either," said Elliott. "Anthor
our best hope there, and
though he's shown great pro
we don't know how he'll rea
a game situation. Saturday he
hurt on the kickoff, so he'll
to wait 'til next week to shoe
stuff."

o fill
er is
reen
t for
lver-
solid
ny is
even

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Houston
Chicago
New York

W L
98 53
94 57
93 59
88 62
79 73
77 73
75 76
56 91
54 96
37 111

Pct. GB
.649
.623 4
.612 3
.587 9
.520 191
.513 2012
.497 23
.381 40
.360 43"?2
.250 5 9

IAAF Gives Support
To AAU iin Battles

1mise, YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
ct in Chicago 8, St. Louis 4
was Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 2
Milwaukee 2, Los Angeles 1
have (Only games scheduled)
W his TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Chicago
Houston at New York (2-tn)
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (n)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (n)
(Only games scheduled)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York 89 63 .586
Minnesota 86 66 .566
Los Angeles 82 69 .543
Chicago 79 72 .523
Detroit 77 73 .513
Baltimore 73 78 .483
Cleveland 72 79 .477
new Boston 72 79 .477
Kansas City 68 82 .453
y the Washington 58 95 .379;
AF's YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
dence TODAY'S GAMES
Ath- Detroit at Minnesota
tates New York at Washington (n)
body' Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
Bal.imore at Los Angeles (n)
Boston at Chicago (n)

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Wash and 'ear cottons
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Our wear, slacks that care for them-
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GB
3
y91.,l
11
l5'4
161/,'
16
20
3112

~1

.IONNOMMIN...

M

li

OPEN MONDAY UNTIL 8:30 P.M.

BELGRADE (MP-The Interna-
tional Amateur Athletic Federa-
tion (IAAF) last night barred ath-
letes of member federations from
competing in any American track
meet sponsored outside the aus-
pices of the U.S. Amateur Athletic
Union (AAU).
The move came almost at the
end of the IAAF's 23rd congress.
The resolution was introduced
by the Australian delegation and
approved by show of hands with-
out dissent.
The Australian resolution did
not directly mention the U.S. Track
and Field Federation, launched
Sept. 1 as a separate entity and
comprising about 450 American
colleges and universities. But it
was obviously designed as a warn-
ing that the new federation stands
no chance of affiliation to the
IAAF.
Three leaders of the federa-
tion-Charles (Chic) Werner, Don
Canham and Dave Rankin-have
been in town presumably in the
hope of monitoring the conference
proceedings.
But. Col. Don Hull, executive di-
rector of the AAU, told a news-
man their application to attend
the congress had been rejected.
Werner recently resigned as
track coach at Penn State to take
over as executive director of the
new U.S. Track and Field Federa-
tion.
Canham, track coach of Michi-
gan, was one of the early or-
ganizers of the JSTFF a year ago
and had predicted the demise of
the AAU as the ruling body of
sport in this country.
The IAAF action means that any
athlete who competes in meets
sponsored by the new U.S. federa-
tion will be barred in international
competition, includin gthe Olym-
pic Games.
A showdown between the fed-
eration, backed by the National
Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) and the AAU is expected
starting in the fall. The new group
has four meets scheduled, includ-
ing a Cross Country Champion-
ship, Nov. 22. Also on its program
is an Indoor Men's Championship,
scheduled for Feb. 23 and conflict-
ing with the National AAU Indoor
Track and Field Championship; a
March 8 or 9 Women's Indoor
Championship Meet and a Men's
Outdoor Championship June 21-22.
Many foreign athletes attend
U.S. colleges anduniversities and
compete for these schools. Under
the IAAF's ruling, they could be

barred if they compete in the
federation's meets.
The resolution as adopted b
congress confirmed the IA
"full and unanimous confid
and support of the Amateur
letic Union of the United S1
as the recognized governing
of amateur athletics in the U
It declared: "The IAAF he
calls upon its members throug
the world for diligence in thes
enforcement of the rules of

We Need Writers!
All those interested in dis-
playing their command of the
English language and in let-
ting the 25,000 Michigan stu-
dents peruse their overpower-
ing knowledge of sports should
join The Daily staff as a sports-
writer.
A meeting of all advocates of
this trade will be held this Sun-
day (Sept. 23) afternoon at 5
p.m. on the second floor of The
Daily, located at 420 Maynard
(just behind Helen Newberry
and the Kelsey Museum).
IAAF in regard to the invitations
for the exchange of athletes with
the United States to make sure
that U.S. athletes are certified by
the AAU as AAU members and as
amateurs.
"Furthermore that athletes of no
member of the IAAF be permitted
to compete in the U.S. except in
open meets conducted or sanc-
tioned by the Amateur Athletic
Union of the United States.'

Pro Football
NFL
WESTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet.
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000
Green Bay : 0 0 1.000
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000
San Francisco 0 1 0 .000
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000
Los Angeles 0 1 0 .000
EASTERN DIVISION
Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000
Dallas 0 0 1 .000
Washington 0 0 1 .000
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000
Philadelphia - 0 1 0 .000
New York 0 1 0 .000
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 45, Pittsburgh 7
Green Bay 34, Minnesota 7
Baltimore 30, Los Angeles 27
Cleveland 17, New York 7
St. Louis 27, Philadelphia 21
Washington 35, Dallas 35 (tie)
Chicago 30. San Francisco 14

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AFL
EASTERN DIVISION
IV L T
New York 1 1 0
Houston 1 1 0
Boston 1 1 0
Buffalo 0 2 0
WESTERN DIVISION
Denver 2 0 0
Dallas 1 0 0
San Diego 1 1 0
Oakland 0 10
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Denver 23, Buffalo 20
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 34, Houston 27
San Diego 40, New York 14

Pct.
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1.000
1.000
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