100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 18, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1962''

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18. 1982

Women Executives Convene

State Governor Hopefuls
Trade Political Barbs

STUDENT LOANS:
Group Sets Aid to Michigan Residents

(Continued from Page !'

greater depths than previous at-
tempts.
Past managerial programs put
on by the bureau have drawn very
few women (only one out of every
38 participants). Caskey hopes that
"a seminar exclusively for women
will be the answer."
Name Sponsors
He pointed to coverage of the
seminar by reporters from nation-
al publications, including News-
week, Business Week, the Wall
Street Journal and the Chicago
Tribune, as a sure indication of
the awareness now felt among
most executives toward the prob-
lem.
The program is sponsored by
the industrial relations bureau, the
business administration graduate
schools at the University and MSU,
and the Business and Professional
Women's Foundation.
The session will complement the
summer and fall orientation pro-
grams.
List Changes
In Psychology,
The psychology department has
announced revisions and additions
to the announcements in the fall
time schedule.
The lectures for Psychology 101
and 102 will be held on the main
floor of Hill Aud., instead of True-
blood Aud. asboriginally planned.
There will be no lectures this
week; the first will be held at 8
a.m. on Tuesday of next week.
The time schedule omitted the
time and place for recitation sec-
tions 21-38 for Psychology 101.

my messages to the Legislature ...
the same program that his Repub-
lican party has ignored and re-f
jected."
He called for Romney to urge1
Republican legislators to call the
Legislature back from its recess-E
the Legislature has not yet offi-
cially adjourned-to' pass Rom-l
ney's program.
"Every one of the programs he
asks is now in bill form in the
Legislature. Why wait until Janu-
ary? That's just politics. Let them
come back now. I'll guarantee
them every Democratic vote and
if he can get the Legislature tof
pass them, I'll sign them into law.
"Too Busy"t
"When the Legislature almostt
passed the fiscal reform program,i
Romney was too busy to come
across the street (from, his post
as vice-president of the Constitu-
tional Convention) to work for his
own program.
Swainson cited areas other than
taxation where he claimed Rom-
ney had taken his platform direct-
ly from the Democratic platform.
Reorganizations in the executive
branch, he said, have been con-
stantly rejected by the Legisla-
ture. Job retraining, for those dis-
placed by automation, is already
in effect.
He also pointed to the Legisla-
ture's failure to provide funds for
large scale advertising to promote
Michigan's tourist industry and°
the rejection by the Legislature of"
a plan to set up a bureau to at-
tract industry to Michigan. All
these, Swainson said, are a part of
Romney's program.
Leadership Failure
Romney charged his opponent
with a failure of leadership. "Since
my opponent can't provide lead-
ership, he says no one can. It's
like a rider who was just thrown
off a bronco saying the next guy
can't stick on the horse just be-
cause he can't."
Romney pointed to his record
as president of American Motors
Corporation as evidence of his
ability to make groups with differ-
ent interests work together. He
noted that the company has be-
come a profitable business and
that labor has shared in its pros-
perity.
Romney also dismissed Swain-
son's proposal of reconvening of
the Legislature; "He expects me
to do as a private individual what
he's been unable to do as gov-
ernor."
No "Carbons"
He also attacked Swainson's
claim that he is merely copying
his proposals from the Democratic
party platform. "I had a public
position on the income tax in 1960
while he had no tax program at
all. The program that was in the
Legislature last spring simply did
not meet my requirements for
adequate fiscal reform of the en-
tire state and local taxation sys-
tems."
"I'm confronted with an oppo-
sition which twists what I've said.
Tiis practice keeps, people from

taking part in public affairs. We
have a lower level of ethics in pol-
itics than in other fields when
it should be higher than in any
fields except religion and family
life."
Swainson claimed significant
economic accomplishments for his
administration. During his tenure
as governor, overall unemployment
has decreased from a peak of 11.8
per cent down to the present level
6.3 per cent, Swainson said.
In specific areas, Genessee
County's unemployment has de-
creased to 3.3 per cent and the
area is no longer classified as a
distressedarea; Ontonagon Coun-
ty, a mining area, is enjoying the
greatest prosperity in its history;
the automobile industry is headed
toward a record year; and revenue
from the sales tax has increased
substantially.
Deplore Interference
Romney deplored the Legisla-
ture's interference in the recent
controversy over Michigan State
University's Labor Relations Cen-
ter and voiced his support for the
constitutional status of state uni-
versities.
Romney said that he feels Com-
munists ought to be allowed to
speak on campus if it is for edu-
cational purposes but ought not
to be allowed the use of University
facilities to propagandize.
He also said that he entirely
supports the controversial rule 9,
an anti-bias rule applying to real
estate dealers. He also defended
the product of the recent Consti-
tutional Convention and chided his
opponent for his opposition to the
document.
Defending the apportionment
provisions of the Constitution, he
said, "In the new Constitution, the
four big counties get 17 state Sen-
ators instead of their previous
seven."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

The Michigan Higher Education
Assistance Authority under thie
auspices of Michigan Act No. 77
is offering student loans for Mich-
igan students entering or already
registered in a college in the state.
MHEAA states that "our rapid-
ly expanding need for more scien-
tific, technological, humanistic
and social knowledge, makes it
imperative that financial barriers
to higher education be removed ...
The Authority is dedicated to
assisting youth, who have both the
ability and the desire for ad-
vanced education, to meet finan-
cial needs during the college
and/or graduate years."
Use Banks
Loans are available for students
in cooperation with Michigan
banks. Students are eligible if they
have financial need, are a resident
of the state, have the ability to
obtain a degree at a college which
has either admitted them or in
which they are presently enrolled
and "indicate a sincere sense of
responsibility toward ultimate re-
payment of any loan granted ...
Legislature Refuses
The Legislature was asked for
but refused a request of $50,000 for
loans and $15,000 for administra-
tion to set up the fund. Private
sources raised $6,200 to set up the
fund, which it was estimated
would make available $62,000 in
student loans.
Interest on the loans are not to
exceed five per cent per annum
and the loan repayments begin-
ning six months after graduation
must be complete five years after
the loan is given. A student is al-

lowed to borrow not more than
$4,000 or the cumulative amount
available to him at any one time.
Amounts Vary
Freshmen may borrow up to
$500, sophomores up to $650, jun-
iors up to $800, seniors up to $950
and graduate students up to
$1,100. The provisions would al-
low, for example, a graduate stu-
dent who had not borrowed while
he was an undergraduate to bor-
row a total of $4,000 rather than
the $1,100 allotted to him as a
graduate student.
Loans are only open to full time
students as defined by the partic-
ular institution. Married students'
living costs 'will be considered in
determining financial need. Loan

funds are only to be used for di-
rect college expenses.
The local bank and college will
together work out the details of
payments and provisions for any
loan given under the regulations
set by the Authority. The college
will also determine the academic
status and eligibility of the stu-
dent.
Apply Through College
To apply for such a loan the
student must secure an applica-
tion from a participating institu-
tion (such as the University) or
from the MHEAA in Lansing.
' Once the student completes the
application he presentsIt to a par.-
ticipating bank of his choice. It is
only with the cooperation of the
bank that the loan will be granted.

,

Diol
2-6264 #ENDING
il * THURSDAY
Doors open ICII THURSDA
12:45 I ulli
THE GREATEST THRILL CLASSIC OF ALL T INI

3
STMagf0 HERBERT LOM'* HEATHER SEARS sTw mTHORLEY WALTERS
MICHAEL GOUGH A IAMMERFIL PRODUC nOk.A UNIYRALINTERMM1iGffAL RVIw
E FRIDAYN
JEFFREY HUNTER "N4 MAN IS AN ISLAND'i

21. T-T
22. T-T
23. T-T
24. M-W
25. M-F
26. T-T
27. W-Th
28. W-F
29. T-T
30. T-T
(There is no
32. T- T
33. M-Th
34. T-T
35. T-T
36. T-T
37. T-T
38. T-T

11
11
11
1
1
1
2
3
2
9
section 31).
12
1
2
2
2,
3'
3

410 MH
16 AH
1053 NS
1053 NS
4014 NS
16 AH
4082 NS
18 AH
2-C Econ
2008 Frieze
2006 AH
20 Econ
1096 Econ
203 Econ
20 Econ
5 Econ
203 Econ

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the fall session should register by
Oct. 8, 1962. Forms available, 1011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
* * s
Chess Club, First Meeting, Sept. 19,
7:30 p.m., Mich. Union, 3rd Floor, Rms.
K-L.
Univ. of Mich. Folk Dancers, First
Meeting of the Season, Sept. 18, 7:30
p.m., Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St.
Everyone welcome. For further details
call Ora or Ted, 663-2085.
Young Democrats, Meeting, Sept. 18,
7:30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3B. Speakers: Tom
Payne, Congressional Candidate from
the 2nd District (Ann Arbor); Alan
Cutcher, Chairman, Young Democratic
Clubs of Michigan.

? y7
The Daily Bulletin is an official
publication of the University of
Michigan for which The Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial respon- .. . . . . .. . . . ..
sibility. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3564
Administration Building before 2L ,
p.m.two days preceding publication.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 .. . .
4:00 p.m.--Slavic Languages and Litera-
ture Lecture-Prof. Shaunm- ::* t
an, "Latest Developments in >? i."R w:r"I4rI{"w°
Soviet Linguistics": East
Conference Room, Fourth :
Floor, Rackhamf. . .
(Continued on Page 5) k a"
I,- -

Ii)

US

FINISH
MUG

NE W

Mass Meeting and Tryouts
Gilbert & Sullivan Society

7:30 P.M.
Sing

Union Rms. R & S

Act

Dance

The University of Michigan Union cordially invites you to stop down and
see work being completed on the new MUG. It is designed to meet the
requests of students for a place which would afford greater privacy on

Paint

Nail

Administrate

ii .

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan