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August 25, 1964 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Special Textbook Service
for PREGREGISTERED STUDENTS
(No Cash Required)
Every year-without fail - the Bookstores or the
Publishers run short of certain titles at school
opening-and many students are without a text
for 2 or 3 weeks.
BE SAFE-
Reserve Books This EASY Way-
FILL IN THIS BOOK RESERVATION BLANK, DROP
IN MAI.. THEN FORGET ABOUT YOUR BOOK RE-
QUIREMENTS UNTIL YOU PICK THEM UP DURING
THE ORIENTATION PERIOD.
WE GUARANTEE
We will select GOOD USED or NEW re-
quired books, as you specify, sack 'em,
and have them ready for you to pick up
at your convenience.
-GUARANTEED-THE RIGHT BOOK
FOR THE RIGHT COURSE!
BOOK RESERVATION BLANK

Student

TUESDAY, AUGUST 25,194
overnment' Seeks

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
The term Student Government
Council is a misnomer.
Its elected members are chosen
by less than a quarter of the stu-
dents. The eight ex-officios rep-
resent no one. Its powers pre-
scribed by the Regents are hard-
ly governmental. And it does notj
directly advise anyone, hence its
functions are rarely conciliar.

Yet the 10-year-old body man-
ages, if only through the inde-
pendent efforts of its members, to
provide "an agency for meaning-
ful student participation" in the
University as stated in its pur-
pose.
This purpose, along with com-
position, officers, functions and
procedures, have all been record-
ed in a constitution. Called the
SGC Plan, it was adopted by.

the Regents in 1954 as a succes-
sor to a larger but weaker Stu-
dent Legislature which had exist-
ed since the mid-1940's.
The Plan
The Council plan was and is a
good basic description of what
SGC is-and what it isn't.
The 19 members (the plan tells
us) are to be drawn from two
student sources. Eleven of them
are chosen in semi-annual elec-

tions by all ID card-carrying stu-
dents. The remaining eight come
from the largest student organi-
zations: Interfraternity Council,
Panhellenic Association, the Mich-
igan Union, the Women's League,
Assembly Association, Inter-Quad-
rangle Council, the International:
Students Association and The
Daily. The ISA representative was
placed on the Council after the
Regents placed his organization in
the membership section last Jan-
uary,
This elected and selected body
names its own officers and sits
down on Wednesday nights to
exercise the prescribed functions.
These range from recognizing new
student organizations to discuss-
ing.University policy-making.
Power Grabbing
In line with its mis-name, how-
ever, Council spends lots of its
time trying to change these func-
tions and get in on some of the
decision-making.
Numerous Council members have
wrestled with student-affairs ad-
ministrators, trying to win real
power over students. Some ex-
amples from the past year:
-Council formulated a motion
seeking control over, student con-
duct. The body wanted the rule-
making and enforcing authority
which currently resides in the Of-
fice of Student Affairs.
-Following up a decision by the
Regents in May of 1963, the Wed-
nesday night deliberators attempt-
ed more vigorous enforcement of
its right to withdraw recognition
of student groups. At ithe Univer-
sity, non-recognition is tanta-
mount to non-existence. The stu-
dent group could not use Uni-
versity facilities, could .not solicit
members, could not make use of
University billboards to proclaim
its activities.
Greeks
In the case of the fraternity and
sorority system, a non-recognized
group could not rush or hold par-
ties. SGC capitalized on this fact
to create a series of regulations
on "membership selection."
Like the civil rights bill, the
regulations aren't aimed at say--
ing who must be accepted in af-

}

filiate houses. They only ask that
selections not be "discriminatory"
-that is, that they be without
regard to race, color, religion,
creed, national origin or ances-
try.
Council has created a fact-find-
ing body to report alleged dis-
crimination in University-recog-
nized groups. And it has set up a
tribunal to try such cases. Ver-
dicts of discrimination could lead
to withdrawal of recognition. Thus
far in the year that the regula-
tions have been in effect, no cases
have been tried.
Observers
--SGC initiated its first year
placing students as observers on
faculty committees concerned with
pertinent campus issues. Some
Council members hope this parti-
cipation will be the precursor to
a full - fledged student - faculty
government. It's a long way off,
especially since the experiment
hasn't been wholly successful and
a bumper crop of committee par-
ticipants has been lost by grad-
uation. Student-faculty relations
will have to begin anew this year.
tlespite these exciting moments,
the formulation of policy can be
a tedious process. The procedures
section of the Council Plan 'makes
all meetings open to the public,
But few students venture up to
the Council's chambers on the
third floor of the Student Activi-

At this sedate and orderly table, once a week ...
FAIRER THAN EVER:
Students TrV Students on JJC

Best of
COIN-OPERATED DRYCLEANI

(All Books Fully Returnable)

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Signed

If you steal a bike, fracture the
University's driving code or keel
over drunk in front of the Michi-
gan Union-cheer up. You will
undergo a much fairer University
disciplining process than ever be-
fore.
The disciplinarian, the 10-stu-'
dent Joint Judiciary Council, has
been around a long time. But its
mode of operation has been re-
vised in a new constitution which
just went into effect last year.
This document's emphasis is
youth: students notify you, inves-
tigate you, listen to your argu-,
ments and punish you for any
misdemeanor. They even sit on a
referral group which hears your
appeal in suspension cases.
Student Product
The new Joint Judic constitu-
tion was written by students. Un-
der the guidance of Director of
Student Activities and Organi-
zations John Bingley, the consti-
tution was shaped to give "due
process" rights in possible dis-
ciplining cases.
Nonetheless, it is still not com-
pletely administrator-free.
Joint Judie is designated by
the Regents as the body under
the vice-president for studentaf-"
fairs which provides "all mem-
bers of the student body with the
facilities for adjudication and
counselling by their peers."
The judiciary body is instruct-
ed to determine if a student has
violated University conduct regu-
lations both inside and outside the
classroom. It has original juris-

diction in making these determ-
mnations.
Bi-Sexual-
The 10,council members, all at
least juniors, represent both sexes
-intentionally. Joint Judic, which
absorbed the functions of the
old Women's Judiciary Council,
prohibits its membership to con-
tain more than six students of
one sex.
For the student accused of vio-
lating a rule, here's what hap-
pens:
-The Council gathers original
material on the case in addition
to checking up on the original
complaint which brought the stu-
dent to its attention.
-It calls the student to a
hearing and presents him with a
written summation of the charg-
es. It accepts only signed testi-
mony when deliberating on the
case later.
-He is informed in writing of
the case's outcome.
-A copy of this letter goes to
the student's college and his par-
ents. He may appeal to have the
letter to his parents withheld. In
most cases, he is responsible for a
fine. Often, a major portion. of
the fine is suspended, subject to
a year without further trouble.
Referral Group
In cases involving suspension or
dismissal, Joint Judic issues only
a recommendation. This is sent
to a five-man referral group (two
students, three faculty members)
for the final decision.
Joint Judic serves also as a

I

clearinghouse for disciplining cases
which may not come 'within its
jurisdiction. Its own subcommittee
refers cases back to residence hall
judiciaries, to the Mental Health
Institute or other appropriate
agencies.
The Council also heads cases in-
volving violations of rules by
groups. These follow a procedure
similar to the dispensing of in,
dividual cases.

I

MICHIGAN BOOK STORE

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