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December 11, 1964 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NMN

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11. 1964 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE NINE

WOW

Ir

ESM Leaders Ponder Success, Future

ii

LIBRARY SCHEDULES

- _- -. ._- ._ ._- 7

(Continued from Page 1) common with the student political of numbering, sorting and classi-
in the protest. At this human lev- activism there; "we simply con- fying students, Weissman explain-
e p, this got to his cold, adminis- ceive of our action in a political ed: "We've all had our names tak-
trative heart-though all he did rather than artistic mode of ex- en away from us. When they
was to say to his research as- pression." tried to take our speech, we balk-
sistant, 'You'll catch cold lying -Berkeley is in a more cosmo- ed."
there, come into my office and sit politan area. Because the region The students also discussed the
in a chair'." has a more diverse population, origin and events of the recent
Faculty support was only part "there are not the personal re- protest, which won the Berkeley
of the story. Questioners want- strictions people often place on faculty's official support and now
ed to know why did the action their own thought." awaits action by the California
happen at Berkeley instead of Ann -Berkeley is in an area in regents.
Arbor? which there is more off-campus Resurrects Ban..
AI'b~~r ,.v. wh,- fh B rklta d mr~~ t

.

and ca
Kather
ble dis
"Sav
ble an
dents
what
the fi
dean's
were s
"Ha
in, I t
would
He s
tion of
launch
eluded
water;
sociali
Alan
Repub
the F
charge
curred

Weissman noted that there are;
"many similarities" between the
two universities, but also named
what he considers the key differ-
ences:

political action, often involving
students.
-Berkeley is part of "the most
grotesque university in the world:
a 'multiversity," Weissman charg-
ed. He explained that University

-Berkeley "has had a more President Clark Kerr admits the
profound experience with impor- university's function is "turning
tant modern trends," Weissman out two or three batches of stu-
said. He pointed to the Beat Gen- dents a year" to fill slots in busi-
eration, a thoroughgoing protest of ness, even if this process suppress-
modern society which organized in es the individual in the process.
"Rfrring to universities' practices

w en tn u er eiey aaminis ira-
tion decided to resurrect a for-
merly unenforced ban on "off-
campus" political groups (all po-
litical clubs there are called "uni-
versity-recognized off-campus stu-
dent activities") soliciting funds
ard members, several groups de-
fied the ban and set up tables
anyway. At that point, Weissman
said, the administration made its
first tactical mistake. It singled
out "arbitrarily" five offenders

wlled the Dean of Students
urine Towle's office for possi-
ciplinary action.
vio went from table to ta-
Ld told the remaining stu-
what had happened and
he planned to do. So when
Ave students went to the
office, there we 400 others
aying 'We did it, too.'
d we not had that first sit-
think, the whole movement
have been shattered."
aid the FSM, an amalgama-
)f political groups formed to
h this particular battle, in-
people ranging from Gold-
supporters to revolutionary
sts.
Sager Intervenes
n Sager, '65L, local Young
licans leader, sparred with
SM leaders over the FSM,
that police brutality oc-
in handling the adminis-
n building sit-in a week ago.
pointed out that published
graphs of the police action
d no "steel-helmeted troop-
md no brutality.
ina Aptheker of the FSM'
ng committee said that the
SAL Plans
(Continued from Page 1)
he University work together;
aising funds to write letters
rents urging them to write
ir congressmen on passing
chools' budget requests in-
oing to Lansing and sitting
Legislature sessions, and
eeting with individual legis-
to present the student's
on education.

published photographs were of
Berkeley police, who were not
helmeted. The police were the
ones who took the names of each
student sitting-in and began to
move them from the building.
"These were the ones the press
photographed." But down the hall
the students were turned over to
police from Oakland, Calif., who
were helmeted and who were re-
sponsible for some of the mis-
treatment of the protestors, she
said.
Sager replied that making
charges of police brutality under-
mines "people's confidence in the
police" and thus tends to promote
disorder. He called for a "sociologi-
cal" solution to the problems of
police action and the unrest which
provokes them.
Publicize Brutality
Savio agreed with the solution,
but said that publicizing police
brutality is an essential step to-
'ward it. "People should know
that in our cities police brutality
is often necessary" to prevent cha-
os, he asserted. Realizing this, Sa-
vio declared, they will realize the
need for a radical reconstruction
of the American city.
Savio was also asked to defend
the FSM's request for executive
amnesty for the arrested students,
despite the fact that they had
broken laws.
"Our principal position has been
overwhelmingly upheld by the
Academic (faculty) Senate, and
there is wide agreement that our
methods were necessary to win
support. Accordingly, we have done
a service to the people of the state.
It would be a travesty on justice
if we were to be punished for it,"
he answered.

Dec.
Sat., 12
Sun., 13
Mon., 14 to
Fri., 18
Sat., 19
Sun., 20 and
Mon., 21

Following are the hours for the
Undergraduate and Graduate Li-
braries between today and the
beginning of the next term:
UGLI Grad
(Fri., Dec. 11) 8 a.m. to
12 p.m. 8-12

22-23
24-25
26
27
28-31
Jan.

8-6
closed
8-6
closed
8-6

8-6
closed
8-6
closed
8-6

8-12 8-12
8-12 8-12
8-12 8-12
8-10 8-6
8-12 8-12

7 1-,lEv C c

i Yo cneaute

Winter Term . .

1 closed closed
2 8-6 8-6
3 closed closed
4-6 8-6 8-6
In addition, rooms 25 and 231
Angell Hall are open today and
will be open Monday-Friday this
week from 8 a.m.-10 p.m. for
study purposes.
7 7 71

R.

Mhat area. this nas something in ge~i6Ww~ilioNw.k raio
Sager
photos
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Orientation begins
Registration begins
Classes begin
Recess begins 5 p.m.
Classes resume
Classes end
Easter Sunday
Study day
Examinations begin
Examinations end
Commencement
Spring Term . .
Orientation-Registration
Classes begin
Memorial Day (holiday)
Spring half-term ends
Summer half-term begins
July 4th (holiday)
Summer half-term ends

Mon. Jan.
Thurs. Jan.

Thurs. Mar. 4
Mon. Mar. 8
Sat. Apr. 17
Sun. Apr. 18
Mon. Apr. 19
Tues. Apr. 20
Tues. Apr. 27
Sat. May 1
Mon. May 3
Wed. May 5
Mon. May 31
Sat. June 26
Mon. June 28
Mon. July 5
Wed. Aug. 18

Mon. Jan. 4

4
7

SANTA Says... DINE OUT

;TEAK AND SHAKE
STRIP SIRLOIN STEAK
$1.30
served with salad, potatoes and bread
CHAR-BROILED HAMBURGER
35c
1313 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
RESTAURANT

OLD IIEIIJELBERGi

211-213 N. Main St.

668-9753

Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR

AL
ii'
000 411,4
C r
"4
r *' 4
a
f~
JI

4r ( "
Q1h

PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed

Mondays

t

State Street on Campus

Phone 663-3441

FRI., SAT., and SUN. DINNER SPECIAL
GRILLED PETITE
iEW YORK STRIP STEAK

Served with onion ring garniture,
French fried potatoes, tossed garden
salad, hot delicious coffee.
urs: 7 A.M. 'til 8 P.M. Daily and Sunday

$1

50

Closed Tuesdays

d

SEASON'S GREETINGS
from
THE HOME OF
CHICKEN
IN THE ROUGH !

s 1r
MCf

Try the
Delicious
PIZZA

Cup ti4 fI'et4lta

207 S. MAIN
Open 7 DAYS

NO 2-3767
6 A.M.-2 A.M.

at ..
105 NORTH FOREST
for speedy delivery
Call 663-7859

Carry-Out Service

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Run

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