100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 11, 1964 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDA. DECMBER, aa.l. 1U

P AEI G TTH:M C H G N A I_ _' m _ l1 f hif i __ _1 O i

i'.iLiL Cl i.,yr ill't{/i;t1T11)Gi1 11 1 0't

I

I

Convocation

Merger

Top List of Year's Sidelights

(Continued from Page 1)
in deciding the format for the
address.
He is reportedly willing to hold
another such convocation next
spring.
Activities Merger
Final steps were taken this year
in a plan to merge the student
activities groups of the Michigan
Union and Women's League.
The Union-League merger pro-
posal, in the planning for two
years, was approved in its final
form by the League Executive
Council, the Union Board of Gov-
ernors and the League Board of
Governors. The 1964-65 Union-
League Senior Officer Merger
Committee was responsible for
both initial and later drafts of

the proposal presented to these
bodies.
The proposal now lacks only
the approval of the Regents and
the members of the Union before
it goes into effect.
An earlier plan for the merger
had been rejected in part by the
Regents. The Robertson Report
had advocated merging the com-
plete Union and League structures.
The Regents endorsed only the
plan to merge the student activi-
ties branches of the organizations,
not the business wings.
The present report advocates
just such a partial merger. It pro-
poses to establish a single Uni-
versity Activities Center respon-
sible to both boards. If approved,
the merger of the two activities
organizations would become effec-
tive next spring.

H

The Regents will consider the
report at their December meeting;
the members of the Union in a
referendum in January or Feb-
ruary.
Student Activity
Among student activities groups,
a host of issues and events briefly
rejuvenated extra-classroom life:
WOMEN'S HOURS-The Office
of Student Affairs continued the
trend toward liberalization of
women's hours when it acted in
the spring to:
--Abolish hours for junior wom-
en on weekends;
-Extend hours for sophomore
and freshman women; and
-Allow individual houses to de-
termine calling hours and sign-
out procedures.
Working with the OSA in this
area was the Women's. Confer-
ence Committee, which had sur-
veyed 3400 women in an attempt
to discover their preferences about
regulations earlier in the spring.
AFFILIATE GROUPS-Panhel-,
lenic Association this year con-
ducted its first fall rush and ap-
proved a new honor code which
makes possible greater contact
between affiliate and independent
women.
However, the Panhellenic Presi-
dent's Council recently slowed the
recent trend toward liberalization
of rush procedures by defeating a
proposal which would have set up
unstructured mixers in spring
rush.
The Greek system experienced
difficulties when Phi Mu sorority
finally died after two years of
sparse pledging and financial

problems and the national arm of
Acacia fraternity intervened in
the affairs of the local chapter.
Sororities and fraternities con-
tinued the hassle over member-
ship regulations with Student
Government Council, as 13 af-
filiate gioups failed to file mem-
bership statements with SGC's
membership committee in time
to meet an extended deadline.
Regent Allan R. Sorenson of
Midland set off a virtual chain of
reaction on the membership issue
when he told a dinner of affiliate
presidents that fraternities and
sororities should be completely in-
dependent of the University.
"Fraternities and sororities are
private social clubs," he said. "The
right to discriminate must be
guaranteed to these groups" but
"there very clearly can be no form
or trace of discrimination on the
basis of race, religion or national
origin" at the University.
Sorenson's remarks drew un-
favorable response from Regental,
administrative and affiliate quar-
ters.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT -
Low vote tallies at Student Gov-
ernment Council's spring and fall
elections registered decreasing
student interest in SGC.
The spring election, which
prompted the birth of the Student
Government Reform Union (SG-
RU), a group favoring the aboli-
tion of SGC, and the Students
United for Responsible Govern-
ment (SURGe), an organization
formed to counteract SGRU, was
marked by numerous irregularities,
including the theft of 6000 ballots
the night before the election.

The fall election drew the low-
est voter return in the history of
SGC: Only 2,569 valid ballots
were cast. In addition, only six
regular and three write-in can-
didates ran for the six vacant
Council seats.
Also in the fall of the year,
Council voted to abolish the ex-
officio. seat held by the Daily
editor, citing a possible conflict
of interests as rationale.
Finally, Council became in-
creasingly involved with the stu-
dent protest groups which sprang
up during the fall term.
PROTEST GROUPS -- Two
prominent student protest groups
led the fight to win higher wages
and a higher place on the admin-
istration's priority list for stu-
dents.
The University of Michigan Stu-
dent Employes Union (UMSEU)
sought a minimum $1.25 an hour
wage for students working in the
residence. halls but was largely
unsuccessful in its attempts to
"bargain" with University per-
sonnel officers.
However, the administration
later moved to raise student wages
from the present $1.00 per hour
to a minimum of $1.15 effective
Jan. 1, 1966, with an increase to
$1.25 per hour by Jan. 1, 1967.
The Student Action League
(SAL) led student discontents to
a Diag demonstration and a
Hatcher open house, where they
were rebuffed by the President for
taking grievances to a social
gathering.
The SAL, contending that the
administration had placed the
student too low on its priority
list, won a hearing with President
Hatcher but later expressed strong
dissatisfaction with his comments.
Voice political party, in large
part responsible for the revival
of student protest, was found
guilty by Joint Judiciary Council

of holding the unregistered rally
and illegally distributing pam-
phlets in the Fishbowl.
NEW GROUPS-This year saw
the birth of one new student ac-
tivities group and the rejuvena-
tion of another.
The Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications granted Offset,
a planned campus literary maga-
zine, permission to publish one is-
sue, despite opposition from Gen-
eration, the campus inter-arts
magazine.
Challenge, a group disbanded
four semesters ago, was reacti-
vated in the fall to sponsor a lec-
ture series on the "Challenge of
Communist China."
Other University events which
drew considerable response among
students were the graduation ad-
dress delivered in the Michigan
Stadium by President Lyndon B.
Johnson, a lecture given by George
Lincoln Rockwell, head of the
American Nazi Party, the winning
of the Big Ten football champion-
ship and the University's accept-
ance of a Rose Bowl bid.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student ,organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
Jose Chipenda from Angola, "The Af-
rican Situation--Political Ferment, Uni-
versity Situation, Church's Role," Dec.
11, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking and/or
tobogganing, Dec. 13, 2 p.m., Rackham-
Huron St. entrance.
'* * *
WAA Folk Dance Club, Folk dance
with instruction suitable for begin-
ners, Fri., Dec. 11, 8-10:30 p.m., Wom-
en's Athletic Bldg.

J

S.T.O.. TOURS
(Student Travel Overseas Program)
HAS ARRANGED A SPECIAL TOUR
for U of M TRIMESTER
Starts: PARIS, MAY 12 $84000
Ends: LONDON, JUNE 29 Land
* Arrangements
Tour covers Central Europe, including Spain.
Stop in, or call and we will mail you a brochure.
CONLIN TRAVEL BUREAU, Inc.
1329 S. University 662-5587
-~ -~~-~~.- r-~ ~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -W

TONIGHT at NEWMAN, 7:30 P.M.
FR. RAY ELLIS, Ass't. Director of
The Confraternity of Christian Doctrine
"CHRISTIANITY AND
COMMUNITY"
Newman Student Association, 331 Thompson

Leave this brochure where
your dad can see it.
Want to spend 45 fascinating lays touring the continent? Leave
BOAC'sbrochure where it'll do thebmost good. You won't be sorry.
It's a chance not just to see Europe. but to get to know "it. A chance to
meet students and teachers of other countries. A chance to visit the
museums and art galleries you've always read about. A chance to hear
great music, and see great ballet. A chance to talk to people-to find out
how they live, and think, and feel about things. It's also a chance to
relax and get a tan (the tour includes sunny places as well as cultural
ones). How much does the whole wonderful holiday cost? $1099.30*
from New York. If dad thinks that figure is a little high, remind hirn
that you'll be away all of 45 days and that the price is all-inclusive.
*Price based on economy air fare and double occupancy in hotels.
It could get you a free
European tour.
British Overseas Airways Corporation
Dept. BE-178
530 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10036
IPlease send me your free brochure describ-I
ing al of BOAC's 1965 student tours. And ( All over the world BOAC
don't limit it to the 45-day trip. Just send it takes good care of you
soon."dsbeen in such a good mood lately.
Name I
IStreet______________
City State AND
Zip Code I DfAf.-CUNAD
Phone Number l -i--
1 My Travel Agent Is. __- __SERVICES OPERATED FOR BOAC.UNARO BY BOA@
L 0703

COMA

ON

HOLIDAY
TRAVEL BARGAINS

I

I

....,.
5r ; '

I

A T T H E S E F
INDIANA
Elkhart, Sykes Jewelers
Fort Wayne, Baber's Jewelry Store
Mishawaka, Wills Jewelry Store
South Bend, Jacobs Jewelers
South Bend, Von Homne i Co..
MICHIGAN
Adrian, Berndt's Jewelry.
Albion, Tuchtenhagen's Jewelry
Allegan, Paul R. McFarland,
Jeweler
Alpena, Froggett Jewelry
Alpena, Kennedy's Jewelers
Ann Arbor, Schlanderer & Sons
Battle Creek, Roy S. Bailey
Jewelers
Bay City, Herman Hiss & Co. Jirs.
Bay City, Simmons Jewelers
Birmingham, Connolly's Jewelers
Birmingham, Demery's
Bronson, O'Rourke Jewelry
Buchanan, Watson's Jewelry
Calumet, Herman Jewelers

I N E

S T O R E S

Flushing, J. A. Bersinger, Jeweler
Fremont, L. W. Geeting, Jr.
Gaylord, Hogan's Jewelers
Grand Haven, Grand Haven
Jewelers
GrandrRapids, De Vries Jewelry
Store
Grand Rapids, Siegel Jewelry Co.
Grosse Pointe Woods, A. J. Susalla
Jewelers
Hastings, Patrick C. Hodges,
Jeweler{
Hillsdale, Roger Losey Jeweler
Holland, Post's Jewelry
Jackson, Meagher's tn Jacobsciis
Kalamazoo, Mackie's Jewelers
Kalamazoo, W. M. Spaman
Jewelers
Lansing, Linn & Owen Jewelers
Lapeer, Polk Jewelers
L'Anse, LangdonsJewelers
Manistee, Closson's Jewelrv
Marshall, Hemmingsen: & Hodges
Jewelers
Owosso, V. L. Schmidt Jeweler
Marlette, Mel Cole; Jeweler
Marquette, Schoch & Hallam

FOR
U of M STUDENTS
& FACULTY
VIA
NEW YORK CENTRAL
RAILROAD
25% SAVING FROM
REGULAR ROUND TRIP FARES ON ROUND TRIP
COACH TICKETS FROM ANN ARBOR TO SPE-
CIFIED DESTINATIONS AS QUOTED BELOW.
TICKETS ARE GOOD FOR USE ' GOING ANY
TRAIN DEC. 18 THRU 24 AND BEAR FINAL
RETURN LIMIT OF JAN. 11TH, 1965.
(TICKETS WILL NOT BE HONORED IN STAND-
ARD SLEEPING CARS OR SLEEPERCOACHES.)
EASTBOUND SCHEDULE
N.0I (X)
SNo. 40 1No.3681INo.354 I No.8 I
1 1 II J I
Lv. Ann Arbor 1:48AIX6:45A 3:1OPI 6:47P
Ar. Detroit 2:50A1X7:40AI 4:15P I 7:50P 1
Lv. Detroit 3:20A 8:45A %4:55P 8:15PI
Ar. Buffalo f 7:45A 1:10PI 9:30PI12:42AI
Ar. Rochester | 9:25A 2:30P 11:23P1 2:05A1
Ar. Syracuse 10:53A 3:52P1 12:58AI 3:29AI
Ar. Utica I11:48A1 4:40P1 1:57AI-
Ar. Albany I 1:40P1 6:20P I 3:45AI 5:53AI
Ar. New York 5:10PI 9:20PI 7:10AI 9:00AI
INo.4041 1 I I
Ar. Springfield I 6:56P 9:45AI
Ar. Boston 9:30PI I112:30PI

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Canterbury House.
11:00 a.m.--Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY
9:15 a.m.-Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
Sunday at 8:45 and 11:15: Services with Holy
Communion, with the Rev. Alfred Scheips
preaching on "Advent's Annual Appraisal."
Sunday at 6:00: Chapel Christmas Banquet.
Phone for reservations.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.: Advent Vespers,
with Holy Communion.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Campus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "Born a Child and Yet a King."
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Pine Room.
"Religious Groups in America: Christian
Science."
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Christmastree decorating party.
TUESDAY
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Bissell's apart-
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel. Fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Dinner
and volleyball.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Wesley Lounge.
Dinner and Social Evening.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses at 6:30, 7:00,
8:00, 9:00 and 12:00 and 5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 pm.--Mother Perpetual
Help Devotions. Confessions following.'
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

SAVE
R.T.
No.356 Student
( Fare

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
432 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev. A. G. Habermehl, Postors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild

Was

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Services 9:30 and 11C:15 a.m.
"WHAT PRICE PEACE ON EARTH',
Rev. John L. Peters (visiting minister)
CHURCH SCHOOL, crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11:15 a.m.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.

U~(CH
B ATHl

BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron 663-9376
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. - Campus Class, "Who V4
Jesus?
11:00 a.m.-Worship, First Baptist Church.
6:45 p.m.-Meeting
Paul W. Light -- Campus Minister
James H. Middleton-Senior Minister

9:37P
10:40P

$21.10
25.90
29.80
32.35
37.801
43.751

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
730 Tappan-662-4245
Russell M. Fuller-Pastor

7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

Sunday Worship-10:45 a.m.
Monday: Buffet Luncheon at 121
Was The Week That Was."

noon. "That

45.101
52.25
arrives

I

(X)-Daily except Sunday. On Sunday leaves at 5:26 AM,e
Detroit 6:30 AM.
% -Daily except Saturday.
WESTBOUND SCHEDULE

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. and S. Forest Ave.
Pastors: Henry O. Yoder

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan.
A.M. Sermon-"The Temperature of Love."
5:15 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-Candlelight Service.

CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe-662-5189
J. E. Edwards-Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar on
Christian Thought.

Historic

SNo.39 I1No. 17 I No.355 1No.357

7jNo.369' I

1 1

i

I

It

# E-.-

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan