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December 03, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-12-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TAURSUAY,:IECEMBER 3, 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3.1964

_ _... _, .__ .., _,, ,, s

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Says 'Peacemaker' Poses Moral Issue

Across Campus

Examination Schedule-
_The Real One This Time!
a

By GAIL BLUMBERG
When a man knows that an act
of violence is inevitable should he
try to stop it anyway? Is being
a moral man worth it? Carl
Oglesby, author of "The Peace-
maker," feels that the audience
should be left with these ques-
tions at the end of his play.
The University Players gave the
premiere performance of Ogles-
by's play yesterday in Trueblood
Aud. The author, now an Ann Ar-
bor resident, began his work in
the playwriting class of the Eng-
Students Form
Oregon Lobby
Members of the newly orga-
nized Student Committee for
Higher Education will represent
the University of Oregon at the
opening session of the state Leg-
islature in January, according to
Ed Stone, chairman of the public
relations subcommittee.
Purposes of the two-week old
lobby program are to promote the
public image of Oregon's higher
education system, and to present'
the system's needs to the state.
Oregon is the only state univer-
sity with such a committee, but
several other schools have ex-
pressed similar interests.

lish department while a student
at the University.
"The Peacemaker" is based on
the Hatfield - McCoy vendetta
which occurred on the Kentucky-
West Virginia border in the post
Civil War era. In Oglesby's play,
Dyke Garret performs as the self-
appointed peacemaker of the feud.
Play of Issues
Oglesby, in explaining his choice
of subject matter, refers to "The
Peacemaker" as an issues play,
basically an anti-war play. "I liked
the fact that this material was
historical," Oglesby said. People
know in advance that the peace-
maker failed; the Hatfield-Mc-
Coy feud was not stopped. "I don't
want to create any false suspense."
We know that no single man
can make peace, but this is not
the main question, Oglesby main-
tained. Garret was killed for his
attempt at peacemaking. What we
should ask is was he a fool?
Should he have bothered to in-
terfere knowing the feud was in-I
evitable?
The play is in a geographic area
which was castled out of Ameri-
can civilization, Oglesby noted.
The only force for order in these
mountains was the individual's
sustaining force from moment to
moment. Yet, social pressures and
public opinion could have some
force on him.
"This society was the closest
American equivalent to the moral

autonomy of the feudal kings.
They made their own law based
on the immediate reflection of
what they were. These people
weren't saved from themselves by
a social conscience."
According to Oglesby, the peo-
ple portrayed are capable of pas-
sionate statement, which was al-
ways close to the surface. It does
not have to work its way out, he
said. They are direct, almost con-
mon sensical.
Larger Dimension
Prof. Kenneth T. Rowe of the
English department, who taught
Oglesby in the advanced playwrit-
ing course, is aware of a larger
dimension in the play:
"In one sense Carl Oglesby's
play is about the Hatfields and
the McCoys of the Kentucky-West
Virginia border countries. The
feuding Hatfields and McCoys
have become a part of the folk-
lore of the United States. With
the "hill-billy" matter generally,
j they have been cheapened, stereo-
typed, and finally made comic
by the destructive process of the
everlasting flow of mass media,
radio, cartoon strip and comic
book, TV, and motion picture.
"Both the debasement and the
concern of the serious folklorists
with ballad and story are ir-
relevant to Mr. Oglesby's play. The
Hatfield-McCoy feud is the leg-
end. rather, from which he has

derived a contemporary play as
the Greeks and Shakespeare, and
Arthur Miller in "The Crucible,"
drew on stories from a more prim-
itive past for the dramas of their
own sophisticated times.
Absorbing Characters
In experiencing the play one
wholly forgets the irrelevant asso-
ciations and is absorbed into a
tragic drama of intricately con-
ceived and deeply revealed char-
acters in which a story in a nar-
row and isolated background be-
comes as a microcosm of the gen-
eration and continuation of strife.
There is no overt pointing to ex-
tension beyond the localized back-
ground, but the relevance is ines-
capable.
"The protagonist, Dyke Garret,
a man of sophisticated conscious-
ness returned to his native re-
gion, is not only the "peacemaker"
of the Hatfield-McCoy strife, but
in his search for the meaning of
integrity and identity is endeav-
oring to make peace within him-
self."
Oglesby, who has attended all;
rehearsals of his play, received
the major Hopwood award in
drama (1960-61) for the combin,.
ed scripts of "The Season of The
Beast, The Hero and The Peace-
maker." The first of these was
produced by the University Play-
ers in Jan. 1961, while "The
Hero" is now on option in New
York.

The Young Dems chose officers
for the coming year at Tuesday
evening's meeting. Mike Grondin,
'66, was re-elected to the chair-
manship. Sharing responsibilities
with Grondin, will be Daniel Red-
stone, '65A&D, executive vice-
chairman, and Douglas Lambarth,
'67L, administrative vice-chair-
man. The slate was rounded out
with Cynthia Coon, '66ED, secre-
tary, and Mark Killingsworth, '67,
treasurer.
THURSDAY, DEC. 3
2:15 p.m. - Stephen Fox, re-
search Institute will speak on
"Sensory Interaction and Associa-
tion in the Brain" in Rm. 1057 in
MHRI.
3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.-Mrs. Mar-
guerite Murray, executive director
of the Michigan League for Nurs-
ing, and Miss Teresa Crowley, as-
sistant director of the Service to
State Leagues of the National
League for Nursing, will discuss
"Progress, Program and Prospects
of the Michigan League for Nurs-
ing in the Ann Arbor Public Li-
brary, 343 S. Fifth Avenue.
4:10 p.n.-Prof. Robert J. Lif-
ton of Yale University will speak
on "The Atomic Bomb Experience
in Hiroshima: A Psychological
Appraisal" in Rm. 200 of Lane
Hall.
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present "The Savage
Eye" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Carl Olgesby's "The
Peacemaker" in Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m.-Prof. Marvin Felheim
an obert Haugh of the English
deadrtmntwill discuss "Satire
adCntemporary Fiction" in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.j
FRIDAY, DEC. 4

Guild will present "The Silent
Spring" and "The Savage Eye" in
the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Carl Oglesby's "The
Peacemaker" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The U-M Consort of
voices, viols and other historic in-
struments will present a Collegium
Musicum concert in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organi-
zations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
University of Michigan Amateur Ra-
dio Club, NO December meeting.
Cervantes Club, Weekly meeting,
Thurs., Dec. 3, 8-10 p.m., Room 3N,
Michigan Union. Speaker: Martin C.
Taylor, topic: "The Poetry of Gabriela
Mistral."
Christian Science Organization, Meet-
ing, Thurs., Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Room
528D, SAB.
IAESTE, Mass organizational meeting,
Thurs., Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Activities
Room, International Center. Call Ed
Fagerlunn for information.
International Students Association,
Philippine Week, culminating in cul-
tural party, Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m., sponsor-
ed by the Philippine-Michigan Club at
the International Center.
* * **
Newman Student Association, Slide
lecture, "Church Architecture in Eu-
rope" by Prof. Olenckl, Dec. 4, 7:301
p.m., 331 Thompson .
Seventh Day Adventist Student Asso-
ciation, Lecture-discussion, Dr. Lief K
Tobiassen, professor of history and poli-
tical science at Andrews University,
Berrien Springs, Mich. Topic: "Religion
in Russia; Yesterday, Today and To-
morrow," Sat., Dec. 5, 4 p.m., Multi-
purpose Room, Undergrad Library.
WAA Folk Dance Club, Folk dance
with instruction suitable for beginners,
Fri. Dec. 4, 8-10:30 p.m., Women's Ath-
letic Bldg.

7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

-The Cinem,

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
complete, corrected examination
schedule for this fall. This latest
version disagrees at a few points
with both the schedule printed
earlier in The Daily, 'which con-
tained errors; and the schedule in
the University Time Schedule,
which has been changed slightly
since the Time Schedule was pub-
lished.
The following e x a m inaion
schedule is for all University de-
partments and schools with the'
exception of the Law and Medical
Schools.
The examination code letter
corresponds to the time of the
first lecture for courses having
both lecture and recitation periods
or to the time of the first recita-
tion in courses which do not have
lectures. Certain courses having
special examination periods are
indicated below. Classes beginning
on the half hour will be scheduled'
for the preceeding hour.

and special permission is secured
from the department. If neither
is in boldface, either is available
by each student without regard to
the section of the course in which
he is enrolled.
School of Business Administration
Course Examination Code Letter
Accounting 271, 500 ......W, Y
Busi. Admin. 305, 505 ......,Q, S
Busi. Admin. 450 ...........R, U
Finance 300 ...............J, U
Indust. Rel. 322, 522 ......P, X
Indust. Rel 500, 300........0, T
Marketing 300, 301, 500, 501 H, V
Statistics 505..............S, X

College of Engineering
Eng. Graphics 101.......U,
Eng. Graphics 102, 104 . ....Q,"
LSA College

V
W

Time
8..A
9..B'
10. .C
11. .D
12-Q
1..E
2..F
3.. G
4. .R

MONDAY
Exam
Wed., Dec. 16, 8-10
Thurs., Dec. 17, 8-10
Fri., Dec. 18, 8-10
Tues., Dec. 22, 8-10
Wed., Dec. 16, 4-6
Mon., Dec. 21, 8-10j
Sat., Dec. 19, 8-10
Thurs., Dec. 17, 4-6
Fri., Dec. 18, 4-6
TUESDAY
Exam

....... ...............................
pct....:n.::.. ... ... ................................................... ....... .. . ......... ,......... ps........ ..... 1. ".............1.........................
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
":s+"tAA}':"\:$ ....:. ..::::.......... 1.1:.v:... . ..... ":tt~x .y~. ' ?

Time
j 8..H
9. .I
10. .J
11. .K
12..S
1. Mv
2. .N
3..F
4. .T

Tues., Dec. 22, 4-6
Mon., Dec. 21, 4-6

1
a
C

Tues., Dec. 22, 1:
Wed., Dec. 16,
Mon., Dec. 21,
[Tues., Dec. 22,
Sat., Dec. 19,
Thurs., Dec. 17,
Fri., Dec. 18,

Chemistry 103, 104.......R, Y
Economics 101, 102, 103, 104 S, X
Economics 271 ............ W, Y
English 123, 124 .. . ......... L
French 101, 102, 103, 111,
112, 221, 231, 232, 361, 362 P, U
German 101, 102, 111, 231,
232, 236........... ....T, V
Italian 101, 102 ............ T, V
Latin 103, 221, 222 .......... P, V
Mathematics 115, 215.....K, W
Physics 153 ............O. , S
Psychology 380...... ...0, Y
Russian 101, 111, 201, 202,
301, 401 ................. . P, U
Russian 351 ................ T, V
Russian 451 ...............K, Q
Sociology 380 ,.............0, Y
Spanish 101, 102, 103, 221,
231, 232.................T, V
Special Periods Schedule
L. .,..Tues., Dec. 15, 2-4 p.m.
0.... .Sat., Dec. 19, 4-6 p.m.
U... .Wed., Dec. 16, 1:30-3:30
p.m.
V .. . .Thurs., Dec. 17, 1:30-
3:30 p.m.
W ....Fri., Dec. 18, 1:30-3:30
p.m.
X....Sat., Dec. 19, 1:30-3:30
p.m.
Y. . . .Mon., Dec. 21, 1:30-3:30
p.m.
Z. . . .To be arranged.

:30-3:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10 :30-12 :30
10 :30-12 :30

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity 01 Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibilty. Notces should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
Day Calendar.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-Arthur S.
Hahn, Graduate' School of Business Ad-
ministration, "Effective College Recruit-
ing and Interviewing": Michigan Un-
ion, 8:30 a.m.
William G. Dow Recognition Seminar
In Engineering-"New Research Fron-
tiers in Physical Electronics": Regis-
tration, Rackham Lobby, 8:15 a.m.
School of Music Doctoral Degree Re-
cital-Paul Fischer, French horn: Re-
cital Hall, School of Music, 8 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
Ernest Pecsar, Chemical Engineering;
thesis: "Solution Thermodynamics from
Gas Liquid Chromatography," Thurs.,
Dec. 3, 3201 E. Engrg. Bldg., 3 p.m.
Chairman, J. J. Martin.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
C. Ylh, Engineering Mechanics Dept.,
"Large Amyliture Magneto Hydrody-
namics," 246 W. Engrg., 4 p.m. Refresh-
ments in Room 350 W. Engrg. at 3:30
p.m.
Sociology Colloquium: Herman Gold-
stein, University of Wisconsin Law
School, "Race Tensions and the Po-
lice," Thurs., Dec. 3, 2003 Angell Hall,
Botany Seminar: Norman Good, MSU,
"Quantasomes and the Sites of Pho-
tosynthetic Oxygen Production": 1139
Natural Science Bldg., 4:15 p.m.
General Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb.
28, 1936: "Students shall pay all ac-
counts due the University not later,
than the last day of classes of each
semester or summer session. Student
loans which are not paid or renewed
are subject to this regulation; however,
Ending Tonight

student loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the close of
business on the last day of classes will
he reported to the Cashier of the Uni
versity and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades forthe semester
or summer session just completed wtil
not be released, and no transcript of
credits will. be issued.
"(b) All students owing such accounts
will not be allowed to register in any
subsequent semester or summer session
antil payment has been made."
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe's Sport Shop, 711 N. University
Ave., or at Tice's Men's Shop, 1107 S.
University Ave. Orders for Midyear
Graduation Exercises should be placed
immediately.
Student Government Council approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become
effective.
Approval request forms for student-
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
University of Michigan Folklore So-
ciety, Concert, Fri., Dec. 4, 8:30 p.m.,
Aud. A, Angell Hall.

Honors Council, 1210 Angell Hail, by
3 p.m., Mon., Dec. 28, 1964.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513WAdministra-
tion Bldg., by 8:30 a.m., Wed., Dec. 30,
1964.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Katherine Gibbs School-Two 1965-66
Secretarial Training Scholarships for
any one of the 4 schools. Include full
tuition for the special course for col-
lege women plus cash award. Selec-
tions made on basis of academic rec-
ord, financial need, and personal quali-
fications. Details available at Bureau.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Fla.
-Physical Therapists. Curtis Hixon Re-
habilitation Center, an acute care fa-
cility in a growing medical center.
Ansul Co., Marinette, Wis. - Sales
Engr. BSME, evper. not req., extensive
travel. Design Engr., BSME, 5 yrs. ex-
per. in refrig. Indust.
Mobile County, Ala.-Health Officer.
Eligibility for license to practice medi-
cine & surgery. MS. Pub. Health pref.
Exper. in public health agency. Male
under 50.
Steno Cord Corp., Detroit--Salesmen.
Immed. openings for grads in any
field. Exper. not req. Age 20's. Trng.
program & on-the-jom trng. for rapid-
ly expanding industry.
General Foods Corp., Chicago-Proj-
ect Engr. Degree in ME, EE or ChE plus
2 yrs, exper. in indust. engrg. to in-
clude plant layout, project engrg., etc.
Local Research Organization-1. Tech.
Editor (Ass't.), male or female grad
with exper. in editing or writing on
tech, subjects including physics, math,
chem., engrg., etc. 2. Admin. Staff Po-
sition, grad, bkgd. in acctg. & finance.
Considerable budget work including
costing of research proposals and prep-
aration of financial reports.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

Christmas vacation. If you are inter-
ested please leave name and address 4 p.m.-Members of the Moscow
at 212 SAB. Art Theatre will present a sem-
Engineering and Science Students inar on "Acting and the Stanis-
interested in working abroad this sum- lavsky Method" in Lydia Mendel-
mer should attend the Jaeste Mass Or-
ganizational Meeting ,held in the Ac- ssohn Theatre. The seminar is
tivities Room of the International Cen- sponsored, by the Professional
ictr, 7:30 p.m., Dec. 3. For more infor- Theatre Program.
mation call Ed Fagerlunn, 665-2757 or 4:15 p.m.-Prof. John Ross, of
Al Landsburg, 665-9500. the University of Western Aus-
TEACHER PLACEMENT: tralia, a visiting professor in the
The Ashland Public School Systei, psychology department, will speak
Ashland, Ohio, has recorded a vacancy on "Some Problems with People,
-8th grade English to start either Thoughts and Numbers" in Aud.
January 4 or 27. If you are interested
contact Dr. Joseph Baird, superintend- B. The speech is part of the psy-
ent of schools, Ashland, Ohio. chology department's Colloquim.
1 1
TWO GREAT FILMS
Tonight and Tomorrow
I
Rachel Carson's THE SILENT SPRING
plus
T Sy
T HE SAVAGE EYE by Ben Maddow

Special Periods
Each course, except English 123
and 124, requiring a special exam-
ination is assigned two examina-
tion code letters. If one-is prefer-
red by the department, it is in
boldface type; students may elect
the other only if a conflict occurs

.

SMASH HIT!!

"Marvelous Production, Really Professional. See it."
ELLIS RABB, Director, A.P.A.
"Glorious! It is a rare occasion when one happens upon that
ephemeral mixture of talent that lifts the spirit and the heart.
MUSKET is that occasion."
KEENE CURTIS, Resident Actor, A.P.A.
MUSKET '64 presents
LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S
Wonderful Town

Putnam Competition:
Hall, 9-12 & 2-5, Sat., Dec.

1020 Angell
5.

Attention December Graduates: College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music.
School of Public Health, School of
Business Administration: Students are
advised not to request grades of I or
X in Dec. When such grades are
absolutely imperative, the work must
be made up in time to allow your
instructor to report the make-up grade
not later than 8:30 a.m., Wed., Dec. 30,
Grades received after that time may
defer the student's graduation until a
later date.
Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative Dec. grad-
uates, from the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, for honors or
high honors should recommend such
students by forwarding a letter (in
two copies; one copy for Honors Coun-
cil, one copy for the Office of Regis-
tration and Records) to, the Director,
Dial 662-6264
H-1

The Silent Spring is the superb documentary produced
by CBS News on the bugging question of insecticides.

, The Saw
* by the s
and Intr
I real - w
stream-c
* lonely d
' four ma
* called it
erful im
I

age Eye, written, directed and produced
creen playwriter of The Asphalt Jungle
ruder in the Dust, is a fusion of sordid,

orld images of Los Angeles, and
,f-consciousness dialogue between
ivorcee and her conscience. Winner

a
a
of

r
E
i
i
1
1
i
n
i
1

Tonight through Saturday
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ajor international awards, critics have
t a profoundly disturbing film of pow-
pact.

TICKETS Now:

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
United States Post Office, Detroit -
Has requested a list of male students
interested in carrying mail during

ENDING FRIDAY
Shows at 1:00-2:35-
4:40-6:50 and 9:00

Ig
j niCIUMA GU-ILD.
9 IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
I I
* ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
Ir r Ia: r ~ r "r r r r r r r r r r r~." r r

FISHBOWL, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE, LEAGUE, 10 a.m.-Showtime
PHONE RESERVATIONS: 668-6300

WM09

'

FRIDAY

4-6 p.m. Mendelssohn Theatre

Storting Friday
KIM NOVAK
LAURENCE HARVEY
in
W. Somerset Mougham's
"OF HUMAN BONDAGE"
Watcha Doin'
.Today ?

that man can i
do woman
LAURENCE ECAIREBIWOM
EDNARDGIROBINON

MOSCOW ART
THEATRE

#
U. of Michigan Students . .r ,
e
oor CE1
Have The Chicago Daily News Mailed At Half Price
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advantage of this special University of Michigan student offer
by filling out the coupon and mailing it today.

4

I

LEADERS

I

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* SaturdaySo
Elvis Presley
"Roustabout"

Lecture-Discussion:

SPECIAL
TONIGHT
ONLY

14,wizm

DIAL 8-6416

PA

You're wasting
making time by
ting there!

money-
just sit-

Kelly Girl
Service

"FABULOUS! GLITTERING!
UNFORGETTABLE!"
'~-N.Y. Herald Tr'bums
"SUMPTUOUS!" -N.Y. Times
"SUPERB! A GEM!"-N.Y. Post
St7nos :

"The Stanislavski Method
of Acting and Directing"
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
AND FACULTY

I

Has temporary positions
available for
Secretaries
Stenos

Sponsored by the Dept. of State,
The International Institute of Education,
niA '.

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*MallSubscrpn l ot.,
Chicago Daily News, 401 N. Wabash Avo., Chicago, IlI, 1 0611
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