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November 19, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-11-19

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PAGE TWO

}tl Y YTTT lY . a r a AS wrr rvar r r .r a r

T TH 1fT'UIVt!A N 11 A TU~

1 i MA*l lV ~iRRF .'#1\UENI1kLj k- '

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1964

4

'DISTINGUISHED FA CULTY'
Heady Notes Crucial Fields

Local Construction, A Man's Heaven

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the teacher, or else a seminar situa-
ninth of a series of articles on the tion where there are less than 15
recipients of two University faculty
awards, the Distinguished Faculty students. This provides the best!
Achievement Award and the Dis- opportunity for discussion and in-
tinguished Service Award. dividual attention," he said.
By MARK GUDWIN "One of the most satisfying ex-
periences a professor can have is
Prof. Ferrel Heady of the poli- giving direction to his best stu-
tical science department and di- dents preparing their PhD dis-
rector of the Institute of Public sertations," Heady commented.
Administration is one of this Close Contact
year's recipients of the Distin- He believes the teacher must
guished Faculty Achievement keep in close contact with his
Award. This citation carries with students, something which is pos-
it a prize of $1000. sible .in his department where
Heady most enjoys working with there are 30 to 40 students every
students who are fairly advanced year.
in their fields. Most of his stu- "One of my main responsibili-
dents are interested in public ad- ties is to have enough time avail-
ministration, political science, aca- able for keeping in touch with
demic work and government work, them. It is possible we have pre-
he said recently. vented our students from feeling
"Students working along these lost more than other departments
lines are headed for exciting ca- have due to our small numbers,"
reers. These will be the most cru- he said.
cial fields in our society in the Because most students in the
next generation or so," he said. Institute have a common field of
Heady believes classes of all interest, it is easier to give them
types and sizes have their place direction, he said.
at the University, from the small- Counseling
est seminar to the lecture situa- "The problem of counseling
tion. seems to be more of a problem
"In the MA or PhD program, for undergraduate students than
however, the best teaching situa- graduate students," Heady said.
tion is the one-to-one relation- A combination of teaching
ship between the student and the and research is a necessity: oneI

should not be in just one or the
other. In many universities a great
deal of emphasis is being right-
ly put on research productivity. A
faculty member should be quite
ready to publish results," Heady
said.

By KAY HOLMES
There are still a few things
that women can't understand.
On'e of these is the male at-
traction to the pounding, grating,
gyrating noise of construction.
On the corner of South Uni-
versity and Forest the new 18-
story apartment building is being
construc ed. At almost anytime of
day a group of people may be
seen congregated arounl this area
of irritating sounds.
These sidewalk superintendents
have one thing in common: they're
predominantly male. There are
Ann Arbor businessmen, gasoline
attendants, beats, Greeks, etir ed
men and little boys. They start
to walk across the improvised
boardwalk, but before they can
leave, they stop, lean against the
board protection and stare.
What is this fascination with
such nerve-wrecking sounds? Why
are so many men ensnared into
staring hypnotically at the con-
struction pit?
Students?
One architecture student ex-
plained that "a lot of these ob-
servers are architecture or en-
gineering students." In fact, those
taking Architecture 212 "have to
write weekly reports on the prog-
ress of construction," he added.
"I cut my concrete class to watch
them pouring concrete one after-
noon," he said.

ARTS and LETTERS By Judy Stonehill
Soloists To Perform at'U'
"We wanted to hear ourselves "It is a coincidence that all
play," explained Melvin Kaplan, (the musicians) have risen in
oboist in the New York Chamber their own careers," Mr. Kaplan
Soloists, said. "The group is unique in
For this reason, eleven New having adpersonnel recognized by
York musicians banded together most audiences as the finest con-
in 1957 in a unique chamber glomeration of musicians one
music group. The New York could put together," he continued.
Chamber Soloists performed Tues- Members of the New York
day evening to a full house in Chamber Soloists who appeared in
Rackham Auditorium. Tuesday's performance are Charles
The group's uniqueness lies in Bressler, tenor; Albert Fuller,
its repertoire, concentrating on harpsichord; Melvin Kaplin, oboe;
pieces that neither an orchestra, Gerald Tarak, violin; Ynez Lynch,
nor a string quartet would nor- viola, and Alexander Kouguell,
mally perform. cello.
Tuesday's program is a good Those who did not appear are
example. It included Cantata No. Adele Addison, soprano; Samuel
72 for tenor, oboe, cello and harp- Baron, flute; Isidore Cohen, vio-
sichord by Teleman, Sonata in A lin; Julius Levine, double bass,
major for violin and viola by and Harriet Wingreen, piano.
Haydn, and Concert Royal No. 4 All the members teach music in
for oboe, violin, viola, cello, and New York City.
harpsichord by Couperin. The University Musical Society
The second half included a should be applauded for bringing
Handel cantata for tenor, strings to Ann Arbor, "the only group
and harpsichord and Quartet in of this kind in the world," as
F major for oboe, violin, viola, Kaplan describes it.
and cello by Mozart. For an en-
core the group did a cantata by
Hindemuth.

-Daily-Jerry Stoetzer
Sidewalk Superintendents of All
Ages Gather at Apartment Site
COURSE INTEGRATION:
Experts Urge Emphasis on
Humanities in Engineering

PROF. FERREL HEADY

...._ .,..,... .... ... ...,.....,.,...,, ., i

Merger of Union-League
Activities Wings Analyzed

(Continued from Page 1)
Union Board of Directors:
-The UAC should be associated
with at least one of the govern-
ing boards, since the student ac-
tivities of both the Union and
League currently "derive a major
part of their strength and value
through associations with their in-
dividual boards;"
-"To avoid an inefficient du-
plexity of responsibility, the stu-
dent organizations should be ac-
tively associated with only one
board of directors;"
-The UAC should be under the
supervision of the Union Board of
Directors since "students are most
fully integrated with faculty and
alumni under the Union struc-
ture."
Organization Plan
The student officers and the
student activities functions of the
merged organization would have
no responsibility to the League
Board of Governors, although the
students would sit on the League
Board to insure space in the
League Bldg. for student activities..
The senior officers of the merged
group would remain the executive
officers of the Union Board of
Directors, however.
The proposed plan for the mer-
ger must be approved by the
League Executive Council - the
student officers and committee
chairmen of the League, the Un-
ion Board of Directors, the League
Board of Governors, the Regents
and the student and alumni mem-
bers of the Union.
The League Executive Council
and the Union Board considered
the proposal at their meeting last
week. Neither of them will an-
nounce their decisions until the
League Board of Directors acts on
the proposal tonight. "We don't
think it would be appropriate to
---finest quality laundry-
Suits $1.15

use our decision as a means of in-
fluencing the League Board," Un-
ion President Kent Cartwright,
'65, explained recently.
Regental Consideration
If the merger is approved by
both boards and the League Ex-
ecutive Council, it will be consid-
ered by the Regents at their De-
cember meeting and by the mem-
bers of the Union in a referendum1
next January or February.
There are several indications
that the merger will be adopted.
If the proposal had been rejected
by either the Union Board or the
League Executive Council, the
League Board would not be meet-
ing tonight to consider it.
An article in the Union publi-
cation stated that the merger is
"about to be . . . implemented."
It is highly unlikely that the of-
ficers of the Union, familiar with
the Union Board's attitude toward
the merger, would have allowed
this statement to be printed were
the approval of the merger not
assured.
The League has already begun
distributing the plan for thebmer-
ger to all of its members. It too
would be highly unlikely to go to
all the trouble and expense if the
merger did not seem imminent.
The Regents would undoubtedly
approve the merger, since the cur-
rent plan is basically what they
asked for.

He believes -one-fourth to one-
third of any faculty member's
time should be devoted to re-
search. Then, on a selective basis,
provisions can be made for more
research time.
In the spring, Heady will go on
sabbatical to the East-West Cen-
ter of the University of Hawaii
as a senior specialist in residence.
The specialist program there
brings together scholars from Asia
and the West who are interested
in public administration.
Summer Job
Bureau Alters
Organization
(Continued from Page 1)
growing. In 1962 approximately
6200 students attempted to get
jobs through the service. Out of
this number approximately 2200
received them. Last year approxi-
mately 8,650 students w e n t
through the placement office and
an estimated 2,400 got jobs
through it. These figures include
students who come into the service
to look through the files for jobs
more than once.
"I would like to see more jobs
available through the service in
business and industry," Ardis com-
mented.
"Every year we have on file
about 10,000 jobs in camps, 2,500
in resorts, a number which varies
from year to year in business and
industry and lists of a number of
potentialeemployers in other
fields," Peterson said.

"One builds a reputation only
by performing,"aMr. Kaplan said.
In its early years, the group was
fortunate to have been invited to!
perform at The Library of Con-
gress. Their performances there
and at the Metropolitan Museum
in New York are now annual tra-
ditions.
In 1961, the group played for
for the Prince and Princess of
Monaco in their palace. They
plan to make their fourth trip
to Europe this winter.

A junior engineering student Collegiate Press Service
said he "was observing the prog- WASHINGTON - Engineering,
ress made since this afternoon,' colleges should integrate the social
He lives near the construction site sciences with their discipline;
and goes by it at least twice a otherwise, two Washington experts
day. "It breaks up the monotony," warn, the engineer will not be
he said. prepared for his future environ-
Mud ment.
A third man said he was This assessment came from
"watching that fellow get out of Assisiant Secretary of Defense
the mud." for Arms Control Arthur W. Bar-
For those who lives near the ' ber and Michael Michaelis, a re-
construction site, a daily inspec- searcher for the United States
tion of the progress is common. Chamber of Commerce.
However, one student said he Both men see beginnings of a
"came over intentionally every trend away from defense-related
day or two," although he doesn't f engineering. Instead, engineering
live in the area. will be concentrated on solving
such social problems as urban
Another student said he "heard transportation, housing and ex-
the noise and came over to take Lending the food supply, they feel.
a look."

tractors are attempting to sell.
Social problems need technol-
ogy. "Companies should deploy
their major asset-the ability to
attack a major social problem
through a massive technological
system," Michaelis said.
"Technologically speaking, they
could do it, but they are in-
hibited by laws, regulations, old
codes and a tax structure which
inhibit the use of available tech-
nical know how. These laws re-
flect the past, not the future,"
he added.
Michaelis noted that 70 per cent
of university research is under-
written by the federal government,
particularly defense-related agen-
cies.
"The danger," he noted, "is
thf Chic rno rnram"#

K-

MAtt'AS
/ j

I

THIS is what's
hr appenin'!
$: $,

Barber noted that this move- at t s creates young men to
Explaining his interest one stu- ment has already begun. He said whom the future industrial en-
dent concluded, "Besides, I might that the federal government al- vironment will be quite foreign.
live here next year." Another said lows military research contractors It might tend to create people why
that he had never seen a build- to determine whether their com- find it hard to address themselves
ing of that size being constructed. panies can move into such civilian to mundane, earthy problems."
Several expressed an interest in fiesc
mechanics.fl_ _

TODAY: 4:10 p.m.
Arena Theatre

Promptly
Frieze Building

THE LONG CHRISTMAS DINNER
by Thornton Wilder
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
Admission Free

l
f
!fG
I
7
3
I
t
I'

He cited a design for a techno-E
"It's always fun watching an- logically efficient, lower-operating
other fellow work," a retired man cost design for a hospital which
added. some West Coast defense con-
SUCH INTERESTING PEOPLE
LIVE ON CHRISTOPHER STREET
Meet The;; in
LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S
s
The Musical Comedy Hit
Based on "My Sister Eileen"
PRODUCED BY MUSKET '64
December 2, 3, 4, 5-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Prices: $2.50, $2.00, $1.50
TICKET SALES
FISHBOWL & UNION LOBBY-10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
"': :"{: '"i{:}"{.:} " :{ r }: }^: '" }:{:i: V R :{ :.t {"
HELD OVER
By Popular Demand
SEATS ON SALE AT BOX OFFICE

Special
Today thru Sat.
49c &99c
Suits, Trousers
Dresses, Skirts
1 hr. service 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
KLEEN KING

I cw inm u mmnmnm u mm mm i .mmmmmmmmm. ainmininmininu r~. umisa~s anmininm MWU
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MAEDCHEN IN UNIFORM Tonight and Tomorrow
German militarism developed by harsh and sadistic treatment in a fraulein
boarding school. "The year's best film''-New York Film Critics.
DIAL 662-8871
For Program Information
THE GuNh BUILD
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

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HAL ZEIGER presents
WITH PULL ORCHESTRA
and introducing
BIL L
COSBY
-JACK PAAR'S COMEDY STAR
MASONIC TEMPLE
(DETROIT)
FRI., NOV. 27-8:00 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-$2.50, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00
Seats on sale at Grinnell's ticket office and Masonic Temple box office.
Mail orders filled; please address all mail orders to Grinnell's Box Of-
fice, 1515 Woodward, Detroit, Mich. and enclose self-addressed stomp-
ed envelope.

____ _ _.-- - _ 7

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A & P CLEANERS
312 E.Huron
across from City Holl
668.9500

The Eastern Michigan University
Players Present
William Gibson's
THE MIRACLE WORKER
November 18-22 Tickets $1.25
Quirk Theatre For Reservations
Curtain at 8:00 Phone HU 2-3453

" A
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kOMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
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Dial 662-6264

* STARTS-TODAY *

1

ATTENTION
STUDENTS
Why slave at the
typewriter doing
those term papers?
Have them typed for you
by experts. Your papers
will have a neat and at-
tractive appearance.
Many satisfied students,
in the past, have availed
themselves of our service.

11

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"A lusty. boldly provocative production

NOV. 28

NOV. 27

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HAL RICHARD
BURT1ON-'
HAL WALI'

PETER
P EAN AVISIO N
TECHNICOLOR'
PAPAMOUNT
8-64161

DIAL

Shows at
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WAR-&PEACE
by Tolstoy-Piscator
Directed by Ellis Rabb

THE HOSTAGE
by Brendan ehan

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Why don't you?

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Directed by Stephen Porter

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