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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 25, 1964 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE YOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY

Rising from

Beneath

(Continued from Page 2)
pressure. Increasing academic de-
mands, the innumerable activities
and distractions the University of-
fers, and his Daily work vie for
the student's time. Disconcerting
questions begin to creep in: How
can I find the time to do all this?=
How many other experiences am
I missing? Is it worth it?
Different people arrive at dif-
ferent answers. Some resign, some
let. their studies deteriorate, some
cut down their class .load and
spend an extra year at the Uni-
versity.
Yet . . . many .face and con-
quer the pressures-of seven mem-
bers of a recent group of senior
editors, for example, five became
Phi Beta Kappa's. Deciding it is
worth it after all, the junior anx-
iously-awaits appointments.
Appointments
Meeting sometimies for 20 hours
straight, the senior editors debate,
the appointments and, in secret,'
finally make their recommenda-
tions to the Board at its monthly
meeting. Usually the Board sim-
ply approves the recommendations,
but when it seeks to change them
in unusual cases there may ensue
a whole host of resignations, in-
criminatlons and declarations of
"violation of editorial freedom."
The night of the Board meet-
ing,, with the whole staff milling
about the building and the hope-
ful juniors decked out in suits,
ties and heels for perhaps the first
time, the announcements are
made. Backs are slapped and tears
wiped away, and a skeleton staff
plugs away at the next morning's
paper while the rest scurry for
the traditional party.
The Seniors
So with a mixture of pride and
terror, the senior editor finds him-
self behind his own desk (atop the,
Daily hirearchy - counselor to
freshmen,' advisor to sophomores,
decision-maker for juniors, and
ultimately responsible for every-
thing that goes into the paper.
His time-consuming job-around
60 hours a week-requires all the

MICHAEL HARRAH, Daily staff
member, once wrote an article
about the slovenly manners of
the students in residence halls.
As a result, the students hung
him in effigy. This is one of the.
many rewards of being a part of
the best college newspaper in
the world-The Michigan Daily.
knowledge of the University, of
The Daily, and of people in gen-
eral that he can muster.
The senior staff is functional-
ly divided into eight separate posi-
tions, each with its own area of
responsibility.
Atop the senior staff is the edi-
tor. Freed from day-to-day re-
sponsibilities, the editor largely
defines his own job. Among his
functions are representing The.
Daily to the Board, the adminis-
tration, faculty and students, at--
tending, college editorial confer-,
ences and serving as an ex-officio'
S t u d e ri t Government Council
member. Beyond these responsi-
bilities .are the functions an in-
dividual editor selects for himself,
such as campaigning for campus
reforms, writing editorials which
usually set the pace for other,
staff writers, and taking time to

sit back and confront the broad,
long-run problems that face his
paper, his university and his so-
ciety.
Power Elite
The day-to-day operations of
The Daily's news pages are han-
dled by managing editor, an as-
sociate and an assistant. Their
rigorous schedule includes gath-
ering story ideas; putting out as-
signment sheets, making sure beats
are being covered, supervising
night desk work, answering in-
numerable questions and making
hundreds of decisions a day, and
writing out/criticisms of each day's
paper.
The editorial director and asso-
ciate editorial director put out
each day's editorial page-a job
requiring clear thinking, an open
mind and considerable diplomacy.
As The Daily editorial page is an
"open forum" on which all staff
nembers are entitled to express
their views in signed editorials.
the editorial director's job is' to
put out the best possible editorial
page-patching up gramnmar, re-
pairing awkward sentences, and
clarifying foggy. thinking-with-
out injecting their owil opinions
into what the writer wants to say.
The One Big, Happy
The personnel director is The
Daily's mother lien. Her functions
entail, running the trainee pro-
gram, placating housemothers
whose girls have stayed out too
late, keeping track of which staff-
ers are quitting, coming back,
happy, unhappy, working too
much, not working enough, get-
ting all A's, flunking out, and so
on-as well as being a patient
friend, confidante and stablizing
force for her distraught children.
The magazine editor is respon-
sible for The Daily Magazine,
which is published about once a
month on Sunday mornings. The
magazine, includes articles by both
staff and outside writers, and pro-
v'ides a vehicle for longer and more
intensive writing, and greater va-
riety in style and subject-matter
than the regular Daily pages al-
low.

THESE are the
inhabitants of
the Student
Publications
Bldg. Anong
them are mem-
bers of T h e
Daily, Michi-
g a n e n si a n,
Generation and
Gargoyle.

.t

WECOME'.
MICHIGAN'S Wolverines - Michigan's
famous Marching Band -The Victors ;-
State Street -The League -The Union

YOU'VE (
rP
:*. .
Probablywondered *
what the
STUDENT CO-OPS 7
are 3l about . . .
At Michigan there are three men's, three women's, and one married' couples' cooperatives
which house about two hundred students. Here are a few facts on how the co-ops work,
WHO OWNS AND RUNS THE CO-OPS? WE DO.
Co-ops are owned by the Enter-Cooperative Council (1,C:C.), a non-profit corporation
set up and run entirely by the students who live or eat in the houses. Each member, new or
old, has one vote, and shares equally in 'll decisions: whot to eat, how much to spend, how
much to work.
WHO MAY JOIN THE CO-OPS? ANYBODY.-
Anybody who agrees to participate in running the co-ops democratically is welcome.
Members are accepted'on a first come first served basis without racial, social, religious or
political discrimination. There is no pledge or. initiation peirod.
WHAT ARE THE LIVING AND EATING ARRANGEMENTS?
As a roomer, you are provided with a bed, closet space, desk, chairs, shelves, storage
space as well as the social space and eating privileges.
As a boarder, you get twenty meals a week, planned and prepared by you and your
fellow co-opers.
"'Guffing," our traditional between-meal snacking, is one of our most cherished privileges.
Everyone has free access at all times to milk, bread, butter and jam, fresh fruit, cereal and I
leftovers. Eggs and some other items are charged at cost.f
Any member may invite guests. There are adequate laundry facilities. Co-ops stay open
during vacation periods and in the summer.
HOW MJCH DOES IT COST?
Each house sets its own budget. Average costs for the past semester have been:
approx. per week approx. per senester
For rorom and board $16.50 $L64
For board only $11.00 $176
New members pay a $20 deposit when they join; it is refunded when they leave. There ore
no other dues of any kind:
WHO DOES THE WORK? WE DO.
All the cooking, dishwashing, maintenance and management is done by the members;
each choosing the job he or she feels best fitted for. Any member, new or old, con be elected
officer: president; house manager, food purchaser, bookkeeper. . .
It takes from four to five hours a week per member to run a co-op. The exact work
time is decided by vote of the house./
There are no maids, janitors, resident advisors or other paid employees.
HOW ABOUT THE LIGHTER SIDE OF LIFE?
Co-ops aren't merely an inexpensive way to live. The men's, women's and couples'

- al

are great

traditions of

4

o great

University.

GREENE'S CLEANERS is a tradition,

too, For

.. ::

forty-one years GREENE'S CLEANERS have given
the best in dry cleaning and shirt 'laundering to
thousands of Michigan students. In fact, many
alumni around the country still send garments
to us for special cleaning services.
In Ann Arbor, GREENE'S have four convenient
locations and six routes to service the quad-

I

i

rangles, dormitories, sororities,

frcaterni'tes,

apartments and rooming houses. At the infor-
moation desks in all quads and dorms you will
find a GREENE'S card to fill out and attach to
your garments. You will also find a place to
leave garments for GREENE'S daily pick-up serv-
ice. There is no additional charge for pick-up
and del ivery.

,,

THE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE

On

drycleani ng and shirt laundering takes three
days. For same-day service, take your garments
to any of GREENE'S cleaning 'plants.

EMW amU=M - u . wnis

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