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October 27, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-27

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PAGE THREIR

TUESDAY.-OCTOBER 27,1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T U E S U A ~ O C T B E R 2 , 1 9 6 4T H E|MC|||A||AI L

Power

S"'4hifts in

" LocalIssuesWORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Saigon oca ssues
Still Cripple Probe Viet Bc

I-

I

order Incidents

By The Associated Press
SAIGON-The South Vietna-
mese government began to change
hands according to plan yester- y
day, but in low gear. The mili-
tary regime of Maj. Gen. Nguyen
Khanh resigned to make way for
a new civilian regime, but then
agreed to stay in office a few
more days as a caretaker.
The new chief of state, Phan
Khac Suu, asked the premier and h
his cabinet to carry on until a new
premier and other ministers are
ready to take over.
Suu, an ailing survivor of revo-.
lutionary plotting against the late \
Ngo Dinh Diem's regime, will name
the new premier. Speculation cen-
tered around a former mayor of
Saigon, Tran Van Huong. The pre-
mier in turn, will appoint a cab- MAJ. GEN. NGUYEN KHANH
met, from office yesterday, will remai
The appointments are subject head of a caretaker governmen
to approval by the 17-man high
national council, a supervising
agency and embryo legislature of AFTER RIOTING:
which Suu is the chairman.
Appointed
The High National Council was Sudan Pres
appointed by Khanh two months
ago after rioting shook Saigon.1
The duty of the council, a coali- A l/,
tion body of Catholic, Buddhist
and student elements, was to name
a civilian government to takek CAIRO (A.-Sudan's President
over from Khanh's government. preme Military Council and cabinet
At the time he appointed the his hands, the Sudanese radio at
council, Khanh promised to step ported.
down as soon as a new govern- The action followed five daysc
ment was named. reported dead and 122 injured Uni
The resignation of Khanh's gov- the U.S. embassy and attempted to b
erment yesterday, marking the; The trouble apparently semma
fifth governmental change in Vietsthetngblappart scum
Nam in the last year, was sub- student meeting last week for discu
mitted by Khanh and Maj. Gen. Sudan, where an anti-Moslem re-
Duong Van Minh. The third mem- volt smoulders among African
ber was Lt. Gen. Tran Thien tribesmen. The university was shut
Khiem, who was dispatched abroad down Thursday and some profes-
on a diplomatic mission last month sors resigned in protest.
for political reasons. Minh was the Reports have indicated that dis-
titular chief of state in the mil- turbances are continuing in Khar-
tary government, but Khanh held toum and also going on in other
most of the power. cities such as Port Sudan on the
The US. is in favor of the
switch from a military regime. TheRe Sea coast. However, a West-
sern diplomat who asked to remain
U.S. embassy described the devel- anonymous said Khartoum, Om-
opments as "another positive ste durman and North Khartoum,
toward the objective of estaub- three centers of the rioting, were
lishing an effective civilian gov- quiet yesterday. Some shops were
erment"
Mil" Chief1reopening and government work-
It will b up to he civilian ers were back on the job, he said.
leaders to name a military chief Shops owned by foreigners also
under their government. But if were attacked. No Americans were
the military does not agree to the among the casualties.
choice, observers say trouble can Communist elements have had
be expected in Saigon. some influence in the rioting, but
The head of the military will are not the prime reasons behind
rein much the power in South it. A "National Democratic Front"
Viet Na because of his cam- has been formed by banned oppo-I
mand of the army. stion parties, professional people
Informed sources said the out- and the Moslem brotherhood. Its
going Premier Khanh won over- purpose apparently is to publicize
whelming support from brother alleged government injustices and
officers Sunday in his bid to be- organize opposition.
come commander-in-chief. ., , ,
These informants said 39 offi-
cers met with Khanh at Cap St.
Jacques, a seaside resort and re- b
gional military headquarters, and
31 voter for Khanh. The remaind- BEAUTY SALON ,
er were scattered among Minh and BS
two generals whom Khanh put 609 S. FOREST
under area arrest when he seized Col NO 8-8878
power from Minh Jan. 30. These
were Maj. Gen. Tran Van Doan Evenings by Appointment
and Maj. Gen. TonlThat Dinh.,p

, a, i(Tvi rtanrs

-Associated Press
center), who officially resigned
in in office for a short time as
t.

DETROIT (,P)-General Motors
Corp.'s hourly rated employes be-
gan trickling back to work yester-
day after voting Sunday to end
their 31-day walkout, but unset-
tled local-level grievances still
crippled the auto industry giant.
Some workers were on the job in
the Pontiac division at Pontiac,
Mich., and the Buick division at
Flint. But at least 28 bargaining
units remained idle, because of un-
resolved disputes, including 15 of
GM's 23 assembly plants.
A company spokesman said it
could not be determined imme-
diately how many workers were
ordered to report yesterday, since
the decisions to call maintenance
and make-ready crews were taken
by the individual divisions and
plants.
The strike, which continued de-
spite a national agreement reach-
ed Oct. 5, ended Sunday when
workers gave what the United
Auto Workers union termed "over-
whelming approval" to the pact.
Among the deadlocked plants
was the vital Hydra-Matic divi-
sion in Willow Run, where auto-
matic transmissions for all GM
cars are built.
Disputes remained unsettled at
six Buick-Oldsmobile-Pontiac as-
sernbly division plants, eight Fish-
er Body division sites, 12 Chev-
rolet Division units and the Del-
co-Remy plant at Anderson, Ind.,
in addition to the Hydra-Matic
plant.
-A

Sy The Associated Press DETROIT-Detroit's newspaper ;said the pressmen object to a
WASHINGTON -- A spokesman strike dragged through its 105th publishers' proposal that the un-
said yesterday the State Depart- day yesterday. Striking Local 13 of ion abstain from filing charges
ment is trying to pin down the the Printing Pressmen's union against four unidentified foremen
facts of several incidents which Sunday turned down-by an an- accused by pressmen of crossing
involved firing and fatalities along nounced 230-17 vote-a new pub- picket lines. The foremen are un-
South Viet Nam's border with lishers' proposal endorsed by Pres- ion members.
neutralist Cambodia. Press Officer ident Lyndon B. Johnson.
Robert J, McCloskey said that at NEW YORK-Ford Motor Co.
the moment the government here The rejection dashed new hopes said yesterday it set all time highs
tor a possible uick o peace in a

is not able to "give a complete!
assessment of the situation."
At least four incidents haver
occurred along the Viet Nam-
Cambodian border in recent weeks.
They have involved anti-aircraft
fire, strafings, and guerrilla fights,
At least one U.S. officer has been
killed in the incidents.

-i,. a Z v oiu-- * u Neal ill Uin worldwide production, sales and
labor dispute which has kept De- profits in the nine months ended
troit's two daily newspapers from Sept. 30.
the reading public in a metropoli- Henry Ford II, chairman, and
tan area of 3.7 million popula- Arjay R. Miller, president, said
Stion. extra costs tied in with bringing
Freeman Frazee, Local 13 presi- out 1965 models kept July-Sep-
dent, announced the union's vote tember profits from setting any
at a news conference. record. Still, they were $79.7 mil-
Frazee indicated a new issue had lion, up 14 per cent from the $69.7
been injected in the strike. Hej million a year earlier.

FLUFFY
Y-N ECKS
Since so many of you
hove been storming
our little store
with big requests
for V-neck sweaters,
we thought that you
would be pleased by
this newly arrived
outf it.

iden t Takes
iient Powers
Ibrahim Abboud dissolved the Su-
t yesterday and took all powers in
Omdurman, near Khartoum, re-
of riots that left up to 10 persons
versity students stoned windows of
burn it over the weekend.
ed from official suppression of a
ssion of problems of the Southern

( skx

'r

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
LEAGUE, UNION
p r e s e n t:
it 1(ou 4etaee: CHINA
*Of Its Cultural Character?
Discussion: MISS NORMA DIAMOND
Wed., Oct. 28 7:30 p.m.
Multi-Purpose Room-UGLI
*Of Its Role In Today's World?
Discussion: DR. WILLIAM GABLE
Thurs., Oct. 29 7:30 p.m.
Multi-Purpose Room-UGLI
*Of Its People On Campus?
Oct. 30 7:00 p.m.
PARTY-INTERNATIONAL CENTER
ALL ARE WELCOME

II

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Presents
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7:15 UNION BALLROOM
SAT., OCT. 31-HALLOWEEN NIGHT
FREE ADMISSION

529-53 1 E. LIBERTY ST. MICHIGAN THEATRE

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