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October 24, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-24

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1964

PAGE TWO THE MIChIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1964

OPERATIONAL BY 1966:

Across Campus
_________________

REGENTS ACCEPT REPORT:
Pierpont Discloses Spending Increase

(Continued from Page 1)
Pierpont envisioned this build-
ing program as a culmination of
a five-year plan beginning with
the Oxford project which opened
in the fall of 1963.
Oxford was a new concept in
University housing containing co-
operative units, suites and apart-

L~provYe - vlng l
The Senior Citizens Guild of: 8:30 p.m. - The Mitchell Trio
ments for housing 353 women. single occupancy rooms, 100 suites Ann Arbor is requesting that stu- will present a concert in Hill
The project cost $2.5 million., having a study and bedroom de- dent groups erecting Homecoming Aud. The Homecoming schedule is
Bursley Hall will provide liv- signed for two occupants and 200 displays contribute "two or three listed separately.
ing space for 600 men and 600 double rooms. The estimated cost lengths" of lumber to help them 10 p.m.-Homecoming Dance in
women. Construction costs are es- of the project is $3.9 million, remodel their center, recently the Union Ballroom.
timated at $7.8 million. The Regents also authorized an damaged by fire. SUNDAY, OCT.25
It will consist of eight related extension of Cedar Bend Houses, Zta Tapa, asororit lo-
housing units each designed for Cedar Bend II, to provide space jumae donations at the back ofp.m.- eFer
for another 600 students. It will lumber dntosa h ako
150 students. Each pair of houses hav the s dena st the its chapter house. The guild needs
will share study halls and lounges, have the same design and cost the about 150 pieces of twelve foot
as well as laundryand other 'fa- same amount as Cedar Bend I. long two-by-fours.
cilities. A central service building The residential college is an- lgwb*r
will contain a library, seminar other new concept in University:
rooms, dining rooms, snack bar, living. It is a small, self-contained SATURDAY, OCT. 24
kitchens and other service areas. educational unit geared to a lib-'
eral arts curriculum with integrat- 9:15 a.m.-Tug of war between
The new residence hall will be ed eating, living and classroom Gomberg and Taylor Houses at
located on North Campus, north facilities. Island Park.
of and adjacent to the new School The cost per student is expected 9:30 a.m.-The Mudbowl at Sig-
of Music and the Cedar BenL to be sligh.Ay higher than for the ma Alpha Epsilon, 1408 Washte-
Houses. central campus dormitories, but no naw Ave.
Endorsement exact estimates have been made
Inter-Quadrangle Council and as yet. Diag with the dogs of Delta Up-
Assembly Association unanimous-_- siambda hi d lgs an D e -
ly endorsed the plans for Burs- silon, Lambda Chi Alpha and The-
ley Hall in a report on the prob- AP A M em bhers ta Chi.

(Continued from Page 1)
This orientation has led to the
lowering of the percentage of out-
of-state students on campus to the
current 27 per cent.
Meanwhile the resident enroll-
ment climbed to a new high of
27,388 in the fall of 1963, and the
total number of students taught in
credit and professional programs
reached 42,246 last year compared
to 41,957 in 1962-63.
More Research
Another development was the
increase in the volume of research
to over $42 million. In 1962-63 re-
search totaled $35.5 million while
as late as 1954 research only
amounted to $12.8 million.
The report stressed that 71 per
cent of the University's expendi-
tures went for payments of per-
sonnel services such as salaries,
Oxford Housing

pensions, group insurance, social University increased by more than
security and related employe bene- $18 million to $275.6 million. This
fits. The University spent $97.5 rise in values is largely due to the
million, an increase of over $8 construction of five new buildings
million over 1962-63, in this area last year.
last year. Buildings

Endowment

: These are the Institute

of

It was also emphasized in the
report that the book value of the
University's endowment fund in-
creased from $38 million in 1962-
63 to $41.3 in 1963-64 while the
market value of the funds increas-
ed from $58 million in 1962-63 to
$65.2 million last year.
During the last fiscal year the
value of property owned by the

Science and Technology, Buhl Re-
search Center for Human Genetics,
Oxford Housing, the School of
Music and the addition to the
Hospital of Physical Medician.
Last year $1.6 million in stu-
dent loans was granted compared
with $1.5 million in 1962-63. Stu-
dent loan funds now total $5.9
million.

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REGENT MURPHY
Rule Against
Bias i U
Scholarships
(Continued from Page 1)
The original scholarship, sub-
mnitted in September, would have
awarded a $500 scholarship an-
nually for the. next decade to an
indigent Negro student, preferably
from Ann Arbor High School. The
revised scholarship accepted yes-
terday maintains the amount and
the school preference, but is de-
signed to aid qualified students
"who are handicapped by lack of
funds."
There is no mention of race.
The University's executive off i-
cers explained after the meeting
that discriminatory scholarships
currently on the books would con-
tinued to be offered.
There are currently stipends of-
fered to students according to race,
national origin and locale.
General Funds
The University currently oper-
ates a scholarship "program fav-
oring Negro students from Detroit,
but Heyns said the University pre-
fers to supply this program with
general scholarship funds rather
than discriminatory stipends.
The Regents also accepter a
recommendation from Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs James A.
Lewis that The Daily editor's chair
be removed from the SGC consti-
tution.
He was transmitting a motion
passed by SGC in September
which called for the seat reduc-
tion because of the editor's "con-
flict of interest."
Non-Objectivity
Daily Editor H. Neil Berkson,
'65, had submitted the motion t,
SGC, contending that the editor is
unable to evaluate SOC objective-
ly when he becomes entangled fo
Political and personal reasons with
that body.
Regent Allan Sorenson of Mid-
land yesterday commended Berk-
son for initiating the move after
taking an "objective look" at Thu
Daily's role on SGC.
Other Action
In other action, the Regents:
-Accepted gifts and grants to-
taling $513,817.07;
-*Took an unprecedented move
in reappointing a professor-emeri-
tus, Gilbert Harrison of the Eng-
lish department, to a one-term-a-
year teaching assignment subject
to annual renewal; and
-Paved the way for establish-
ing a communication sciences de-
partment as they appointed Mrs.
June Shoup to an assistant profes-
sorship of communication sciences.
She will join what is currently
an inter-disciplinary program un-
til the formal communication sci-
ences department is established.

lems of overcrowding in the res- 2 and 4 p.m.-The University
idence halls presented to Vice-111 * Players Children's Theatre Pro- Receives Award
President for Student Affairs IIHold Sem inars ductions will present "The Em-
James A. Lewis on October 19. peror's New Clothes" at Trueblood The University's Oxford housing
In researching this study, IQC The Association of Producing Aud. project was the recipient of an
considered several measures aimed Artists, resident repertory com- 4:30 p.m. - Alumni - Student ' "Honor Award" from the Housing
at reducing overcrowding. It felt pany of the Professional Theatre Open House at President Hatch- and Home Finance Agency's Fa-
that the projects now being insti- Program, in conjunction with Prof. er's home. ROSEMARY HARRIS cilities Administration in Wash-
tuted by the University are fine Jack Bender of the speech depart- 4:30 p.m.-"Little Le Mans"-a "Judith" Star ington recently. The award was
but "would constitute only a par- ment, is conducting informal go cart race--on the lawn of the D Qutet will erform in for excellence in design. Present
tial remedy to the immediate hous- question and answer seminars for Phi Kappa Psi, 1550 Washtenaw Rancear ud designeproat the award ceremony were the
stdns3 h pec eatet Rackham -ud designer of the project and the
ing problem." students of the speech department, Ave. 3I n ~.TePPpeenslnsaeaciet
npobm.it was announced recently. . 3 and 8,p.m.-The PTP presents landscape architect.
When presented with the plans The first seminar was held last 5 and 9 p.m.-The PTP presents the APA in "Judith" at Lydia ----}
for Bursley Hall, IQC felt that this Thursday by APA actor Keene the APA in "Judith" in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
project would provide every facil- Curtis and APA stage manager Mendelssohn Theatre. 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild pre-
ity that the students want with Robert Moss, dealing with the 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild pre- sents "The Crucible" in the Arch-
the additional advantage that all technical aspects of the theatre. sents "The Crucible" in the Arch- itecture Aud.
the plans are drawn up. There will be three more sem- itecture Aud. 8 p.m.-The Lubeck Choir will DIAL 8-6416
Smaller Buildings inars, one a week, according to 7:30 p.m.-The Organization of present a concert in Aud. A, An-
Cedar Bend I will also alleviate Prof. Robert Schnitzer, executive Arab Students will have a recep- gell Hall. "CHEERED
some of the overcrowding prob- director of the PTP. The second tion to promote Arab-American 8 p.m.-A speech by Patricia
iem. This project is a series of will be lead by APA actor Paul rela ions at the Assembly Hall of Harris of the National Women's
smaller buildings housing 600 men Sparer on the actor's approach to the International Center. Committee for Civil Rights to be
and women. It will contain 100 a role. The final two will deal with 8:30 p.m.-The Jean-Leon Des- held at the Ann Arbor Community
directing and further problems in tine, Haitian Dance Company will Center has been cancelled because
acting. perform in Rackham Aud. iof a conflict in schedule. __ __

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Union Marks
Anniversary
With Festivity
By MICHAEL HEFFER
The Michigan Union celebrated
its sixtieth anniversary with a
"silver jubilee" dinner last night.
"The major purpose of the cele-
bration was to point out what the
Union has done since it was es-
tablished in 1904 as the first
completely student run union in
the country," Michael Holmes, '66,
chairman of the Union's Univer-
sity-Alumni Affairs Committee,
said.
About 250 people attended the
dinner in the Union ballroom,
Holmes commented. The front
doors of -the ballroom were set
up to resemble the front doors of
the Union, and, as in "the old
days," women were permitted to
enter only by a side door. Until
1946 the Union employed a door-
man to enforce the restriction
barring women from the front
door.
Alumni Attended
Reminiscences by Thomas Rob-
erts, '04, originator of the Little
Brown Jug tradition with Min-
nesota, and Homer Heath, business
manager of the Union from 1908-
1926, highlighted the program.
Managers of old Union Operas
operas were also present. The
Union Opera, started in 1908, was
a fund raising event, Holmes ex-
plained. In the first 19 years,
$125,000 was collected from the
operas.
The Operas, directed and written
by students, produced many songs
still sung by the Glee Club. These
include "The Bum Army," "Col-
lege Days," and "The Friar's
Song."
Band Tribute
During the half-time program at
today's football game William
Revelli, director of bands, will
conduct the band in some songs
from the Operas.
The Union building was com-
pleted in 1920 with funds raised
from Operas, dinners and a na-
tional campaign. The Union re-
ceived pledges for $1.2 million in
the campaign but only $800,000
was received. However, alumni who
did not fulfill their pledges are
still sending in contributions.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. a

HONORED
At The Cannes
Film Festival
It Deserves
its Accolades!"
--THE NEW YORK TIMES

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assunes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices si ould be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
tore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication. and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on Request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.I
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
Day Calendar4
Football-U-M vs. Minnesota, Home-
coming: Michigan Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
School of Music Dedication Open
House-School of Music, North Cam-
pus, 5-6:30 p.m.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

General Notices
Lubeck Choir: The University of Mich-
igan Men's Glee Club and School of
Music are jointly sponsoring a perform-
ance of the Lubeck-Singeleiter Choir
of Lubeck, West Germany, on Sun., Oct.
25, at 8:30 p.m. in Aud, 4., Angell
Hall. There is no admission charge.
Recreational Open Hounrs: Barbour
'.ymasu - il n ue-."cfrnml 7-0inn

Asst. Naval Architect. BSNA with min.
5 yrs. exper. Immed. opening. Age up
to 35 yrs.
Hyland Laboratories, Morton Grove,
Ill.-bales Repres. Male grad for im-
med. opening in lower Mich. Make di-
rect sales to hospital labs. 2 yrs. sales
exper. pref Age under 30.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Dv., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

NOVEMBER 2nd

HILL AUDITORIUM

8:30 P.M.

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Ticket Sales-Oct. 26-Oct. 30 & Nov. 2

8:00-5:00 P.M.

$5.00, $4.00, $2.50

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Gymnasium will be open from 7-9 on -
Tuesday evenings for recreational use SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
of the equipment and facilities by 212 SAB-
women students. Camp Rockwood, Ontario, Canada -
Coed damp will interview at 212 SAB,
Slide Lecture: "The New Theatre," a Fri., Oct. 30 after 10:30 a.m. Specialists
slide lecture by Jacques Polieri, Tues., in Dramatics, riding, music, arts &
Oct. 27, 3:30 p.m., Architecture Aud. crafts, water-skiing, sailing & swim-
Public invited. ming. Also general counselors, program
director & married couple.
Nursing 100: will meet Mon., Oct. 26. Camping-Advantages of being a caup
in Room M5330. Prof. Luther Christ- counselor: 1. working with children, 2.
man, R.N., president of Michigan working outdoors, 3. salary is clear-
Nurses Association, will discuss "Some room & board provided, 4. most jobs4
Considerations in Nursing." end so few days available before classes
begin in the fall.

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CU
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WELCOME BACKZ
MICHIGAN ALUMNI
Keep your feet warm as a Bug in a Jug
That "BROWN JUG," that is!
Boots.. .
boldly different!

Planetarium: "The Milky Way." Plan- * * *
etarium open to the public Saturdays For further information, come to
and Sundays at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Mu- Summer Placement.
seum exhibit hours daily 9 a.m. to 5 - - --- -
p.m. Sundays 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

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Placement
Use of This Column for Announce- Students Wanted: With at least 2 yrs.
mients is available to officially recog- College German to serve as subjectsI
nized and registered student organiza- for an experiment onrLanguages. If I
tions only. Forms are available in Room you can spare 2 hrs. ($1.25 per hr.)
1011 SAB. come to Rm. 3429 Mason Hall any week
* * * Iday from 9-12 or 1-5 to make an ap-
Canterbury House, Sunday snack, dis- pointment.
cussion: "Unitarianism; What Is It.',
Oct. 25 at 7:45 p.m., speech by Dr. POSITION OPENINGS:
Gaede, pastor, Ann Arbor Unitarian State Farm Insurance Co., Marshall, I
Church, Canterbury House, 218 N. Di- Mich.-Claims Repres. Immed. opening
vision, for male grad. Exper. not req. Age
23-40. Locations throughout Mich.
Newman Student Association, Italian National Research Co., Detroit, Mich.
Homecoming Dinner/Dance, Oct. 25 at -Several openings for men with 3-5
5:30 pm., 331 Thompson.1 yrs. exper. in mktg. or media & adver-
S* * tising research. MA in Math, Psych.
Voice, Campus Committee meeting, Bus. Ad. or Econ. Also recent grad
Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m., Student Action with bkgd. in math or statistics.
League discussion. All invited, Room I City Window Cleaning & Painting
3C, Union. Co., Detroit-Industrial Painting Esti-{
, mator. Immed, opening for male grad
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion: to sell, estimate & supervise industrial
"Medicare," speech by Prof. Ronald & commercial painting work. Exper. I
Bishop, School of Medicine, Oct. 25 at in contracting work or painting bus.
7 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw. Rides available Climax Molybednum Co., Detroit -
at Michigan Union and Markley at 6:45 Tech. Librarian. MLS, bkgd. in Physi-
p.m. cal Sci. Ann Arbor location. Exper.
U * * not essential.
U. of M. Folklore Society, Workshop! Maxon Marine Div., Tell City, Ind.-

HOMECOMERS!
___AFTER THE GAME
MATINEE TODAY 5:00!
TakTe your date
to
Twilight Matinee SAT. at 5:00
(SNACK BAR in LEAGUE)

Brilliant Broadway Players

"excitement and polish"
-Ann Arbor News

!

.

OCTOBER 21- 25

THE HOSTAGE
by Brendan Behan -

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JUDITH
American Premiere!

is cancelled, Oct. 24,
Guild House, After game cider and
donuts, Oct. 24, at Guild House, 802
Monroe.
DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS START AT
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05
THE
WORLDWIDE
BESTSELLER
EXPLODES
WITH E
EN T E E
SCREE
\4

Coming Sunday, October 25th
CHOR DER SINGELEITER
A German choir from Lubeck touring the U.S.

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A GREAT IDEA
FOR SUNDAY EVENING
ENTERTAINMENT...
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25
AUDITORIUM A
8:30 P.M.

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Sponsored by Men's Glee Club

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Arthur Miller's bitter attack on McCarthyism, set in the period of the
.Af+ . W -i T-Trin nwr- n nt d inFrench b Jenn Pn aulSartre ond star- I

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Soft, sportive bronze wax contrasts with
handsome crocodile grained upper leathers.
Heels are stacked just fashion high. Dynel
fleece lined with textured rubber soles:
1699
YOUR FAVORITE SHOE DEPARTMENT
SINCE "47"

by Jean Giraudoux

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