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October 22, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-22

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T'HURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,1984

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22,1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

..

COMMUNIST SHIFT:
Satellite Parties Restive

BERLIN (.)-Unrest is spread-
ing in East European Communist
Party ranks over the ouster of
Nikita S. Khrushchev and in East
Germany party meetings were re-
ported yesterday to have been dis-
rupted by unruly demonstrations.
Communist organizations rarely
admit their views are anything
but unanimous.
A communique issued yesterday
by the official East German news
agency suggested that unusual
freedom of expression was given
speakers from the floor during a
meeting Tuesday of the "demo-
cratic bloc," an organization of
party workers, trade unions and
youth groups.
Information Bureau West, an
unofficial W e s t e r n intelligence
agency, said its East German
sources reported visible unrest over
last Thursday's fall of Khrush-
chev among the middle and low-
er ranks of the Communist Party.
It said there had been an un-
precedented flood of questions at
seminars and several had to be
broken off because the discussion
leaders lost control of the meet-
ings.
Walter Ulbricht, the East Ger-
man leader, has said nothing pub-
licly.
Hermann Matern, one of the top
ideologists of the Red regime, was
given the job of explaining the
Khrushchev ouster to the "demo-
cratic bloc."
The meeting closed, saying it

SOVIET PREMIER ALEXEI KOSYGIN (r.) and his predecessor,
Nikita S. Khrushchev, are the center of a simmering controversy
among Europe's Communists. Parties in East Germany, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, Italy, France, Israel, Denmark and Norway have
rapped Kosygin's methods and motives in removing Khrushchev.

especially welcomed the commu-
nique of the East German Central
Committee, published Sunday. The
communique said that Khrush-
chev's ouster "has triggered deep
emotions among our party and
people." The East German party
was among the first in Eastern
Europe to say a kind word for the
deposed Khrushchev.

Give Details of Power Fight,
Overthrow of Khrushchev
MOSCOW {A)-Five secret policemen brought Nikita S. Khrush-
chev back fighting mad from his Black Sea vacation to the Commu-
nist Party meeting that threw him out of office, informed sources
reported yesterday.
The first tip Khrushchev had that the party Central Com-
mittee had assembled in Moscow came in a telephone call, possibly
from Leonid I. Brezhnev, the man who succeeded him as first party
secretary, they said.
The sources say members of the Central Committee began gather-
ing in Moscow Oct. 11 or 12 after being summoned from as far away
as New Delhi, where the Soviet ambassador is a committee member.
Charges
Charges were drawn up, including bungling of the Red China dis-
pute, industrial and agricultural failures, personal excesses and crea-
tion of a personality cult.
The informants gave this account of the events that followed:
Someone telephoned Khrushchev at Gagra, a resort on the
Black Sea, telling him to return to Moscow for a committee meeting
on policy matters. Khrushchev angrily replied that he was first sec-
retary and would decide upon meetings. He could not be ordered
around.
The secret police turned up at Gagra a short time later and five
of them escorted Khrushchev to Moscow. The sources declined to use
the term "arrest" but said the pressure approached that.
Outvoted
A fighting mad Khrushchev was outvoted in a meeting of the
11-member Presidium of the 170-member Central Committee.
When this happened before, in 1957, Khrushchev rallied the Cen-
tral Committee to his side, overruled the Presidium vote and ousted
his opponents, including former Premier G. M. Malenkov and ex-
foreign minister, V. M. Molotov.
This time, Mikhail Suslov presented the Central Committee an
indictment of Khrushchev, charging both personal and policy short-
comings. Khrushchev replied, then looked around at his followers, ex-
pecting support.
Loses Jobs
No one spoke up for him and Khrushchev lost the first secre-
tary's job, the premiership and the seat on the Presidium he had held
since 1939.= The momentous decision was announced last Thursday.
There has been no indication whether he also was removed from the
Central Committee.
Reports are circulating that Khrushchev is writing a paper,
possibly a defense of self-criticism. It is doubtful a defense would be
made known to the public.
The new Soviet leaders probably would welcome a Khrushchev
self-criticism document to explain to the Communist world why he
was dumped.
No word has come from official sources as to where Khrushchev
is now. One unverified report has him confined to an apartment in
Moscow.
At Last-YOUR Chance!
TO TALK WITH
PAUL VAN BUREN*
IN A DISCUSSION
WITH A LIMITED NUMBER OF OTHER
U. OF M. STUDENTS
CLOSED SEMINARS WILL BE HELD
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 28: 1:30-3:00 P.M.
THURSDAY, OCT. 29: 1:30-3:00 P.M.
IF YOUR ARE INTERESTED IN BEING ONE OF
THESE PARTICIPANTS, CALL 764-7442 FOR AN
APPOINTMENT. INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD
ON THURSDAY, OCT. 22 AND FRIDAY, OCT. 23.
Paul van Buren is a theologian and professor at
Temple University. His book, The Secular Meaning
of the Gospel, has somewhat shaken the traditional
theologians of our time. He is lecturing at the
University on Tues., October 27, Wed., October 28,
and Thursday, October 29, on the subject: "The

Elsewhere in Eastern Europe, theF
Polish, Hungarian and Czecho-
slovak parties have openly prais-1
ed Khrushchev.
The new Soviet leaders, Party
Secretary Leonid I. Brezhnev and
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin, have
tried to reassure the restless Com-
munist parties abroad. Both pledg-
ed at ceremonies Monday welcom-
ing the three Soviet cosmonauts to
continue policies laid down by
Khrushchev.
In the restless Soviet bloc, Pre-
mier, Janos Kadar of Hungary, fore
example, praised Khrushchev forI
his "outstanding merits in thef
fight against the Stalinist per-t
sonality cult and in the main-
tenance of world peace."
East Germany's Politburo ex-
pressed confidence in the new So-
viet leaders but said, "it is known
that comrade Khrushchev has al-
so won merits in carrying out the1
Marxist-Leninist policy."
Luigi Longo, chief of ItalianI
Communists, told a rally, "The
way in which comrade Khrush-1
chev has been replaced leaves us
worried and critical. This way in-
dicates the process toward the res-
toration of the Leninist method of
free debate inside the Communist
movement is slow and uncertain."
The French Communist Party7
said yesterday it wants more in-
formation on "conditions and
methods" by which. Khrushchev
was ousted. The big French party,
second only in the Western world1
to the Italian Communist Party,
said, in order to get the answers,
"the political bureau has decided
to ask the Central Committee ofI
the Communist Party of the So-
viet Union to receive a delegation
of the French Communist Party."
Israel's Communist Party paidJ
tribute to Khrushchev and asked£
Moscow for more information on
his ouster.E
The Norwegian Communist Par-2
ty organ Frihetgn said Khrushchev
did not deserve "to be thrown
into the gutter." It questioned that
Khrushchev's age and failing
health were the factors and said
if he made mistakes his successors
must share the responsibility.
Denmark's Communist newspa-
per, Land Og Folk, said ! a cam-I
paign in the Soviet Union to down-
grade Khrushchev has been halt-j
ed because of the adverse reaction.
WE~magmaggammamassas t

Rap 'Auto
Industry
Governor
REED CITY (P) -- Minnesota
Gov. Karl Rolvaag went to bat for
the Michigan Democratic team
Tuesday-taking a swing at Re-
publican Gov. George Romney.
Rolvaag spoke at a 14-county
dinner for Congressman Neil Stae-
bler, the Democratic gubernator-
ial candidate, and Sen. Philip
Hart (D-Mich).
"The Democratic Party knows
you can't run a democratic gov-
ernment by computer or slide rule
-or, like a large automobile com-
pany-but rather with compassion
and understanding," Rolvaag said.
Obvious Slapsj
It was an obvious slap at Rom-
ney, former president of the Amer-
ican Motors Corp., and a repeti-
tion of a pet theme of Staebler's.
The Democratic candidate har
complained frequently that Rom-
ney tries to run the state like a
manufacturing firm-issuing or-
ders and directives.
"He simply cannot understand
any disagreement with his point
of view," Staebler has said fre-
quently.
Rolvaag credited Staebler and
Tom Downs, United Auto Workers
attorney and former constitution-
al convention vice-president, with
his hair-breadth victory in the
1962 election.
Recount
Rolvaag was named governor
after a four-month recount gave
him a 91 vote margin. He had
called Staebler for help. The re-
quest was eventually handled by
Downs-now a candidate for the
first district in the new state
court of appeals.
Downs, he said, "worked with-
out compensation; ,organized our
lawyers and set up the recount
procedures. It brought out the best
in Minnesota-the best in both
political parties."
Rolvaag delivered an appeal for
Democratic victories before a
crowd of 700 in the predominant-
ly Republican northwest corner
of the state.
Local Record
A crowd of that size-reportedly
a local record - in that area
"means something is stirring in
Michigan," Staebler said. "And
we're going to stir that fellow in
Lansing out of a job."
In Saginaw earlier, Staebler
spent nearly an hour in a closed-
door meeting with UAW Regional
Director Kenneth Robinson, but
did not disclose the nature of the
meeting.
He addressed a Mexican civic
group there, calling for federal
legislation to extend the same
protections to native American mi-
grant laborers that are now en-
joyed by Mexican nations. He also
assailed changes in the state
workmen's compensation and un-
employment laws under the Rom-
ney administration.

I

ness and well-bleing of Michligan'sr''
senior citizens. By The Associatel Press
"Tax relief for homeowners 65; WASHINGTON - Republican
and older is needed," said the gov- National Chairman Dean Burch
ernor. He said that one year ago said yesterday the controversial
"we found that any really mean- film about U.S. morality entitled
ingful program of property tax "Choice," has been withdrawn "at
exemption for ,senior citizens would the request of Sen. Barry Gold-
mean higher taxes for all other water."
taxpayers. The film, made and sponsored
"Then, as a result of actual ex- by the Citizens for Goldwater-Mil-
perience in Oregon, we hit upon ler, was to have been shown this
the tax deferral program, which afternoon. It depicted scenes of
I subsequently recommended. U41- girls in topless bathing suits, por-
der this approach, needy senior ci- nography and street violence.
tizens could defer payment of
property taxes while they lived DALLAS-Henry Cabot Lodge,
in their own homes, to be col- former United States ambassador
lectible from their estates." to South Viet Nam, predicted yes-
Nature of Funds terday victory in Southeast Asia
with present policies. "We of the
Romney said the revolving na- I free world won in Greece, we
ture of funds involved in such a thwarted the Communist aggres-
program means it could be ex- sion in Korea, we won in Malaya,
tended in a relatively short time we won in the Philippines and we
to all senior citizens. can win in Viet Nam," Lodge said.
Thepln as i'nitially p roposedi -_.

DEFERRAL PLAN:
Romney Promises Tax
Assistance for Elderly"
GRAND RAPIDS (IP)-Gov. George Romney has pledged to seek
property tax relief for senior citizens and said he still believes a tax'
deferral plan would best meet the problem.
The pledge was one point in an address by Romney Tuesday night
on his past record and future plans to tackle problems of the elderly.
"Better care and higher living standards for senior citizens who
are sick and needy must have top priority in Michigan's society of
the future. We must continue to r -
mobilize our governmental and
private resources to that end,"
Romney said. National
Study Commission
He said a study commission has
recommended 47 proposals con-R oundup
cerning the future security, happi-

PLAN AHEAD-
JOINT GLEE CLUB CONCERTS
ILLINOIS and MICHIGAN
Saturday, Nov. 7th, 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
BLOCK TICKET 'SALE
Begins Wed., Oct. 28th ... 8 :00-5:00 p.m.
At Hill Aud. $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
k IUeIea(I and UsIa 'lyt:3ssoicd Ads

was not approved by the Legisla-
ture.
"I still believe," said Romney,
"that property tax deferral can
offer more help to more people
than anyother reasonable pro-;
gram in the same area.j
"My pledge at this time, how-
ever, is to do what I can to pro-
vide some form of tax relief that
is both reasonable and meaning,
ful."
Romney said however that what
he palled the "humiliating prac-
tice" of lien provisions should be
eliminated from old age assist-
ance and medical assistance acts.
"By accepting these helps," said
the governor, "pride and dignity
suffer and the final indignity is
the filing of a fifth class claim
by the state against their older
persons' estates upon death."

F.G.B.M.F.
Invite you to hear
REV. GEORGE BILLINGS
Minister of the 1st Avenue
Baptist Church of Toronto,
a nephew of Dr. Oswald J. Smith
Date: Sat., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.
Place: University Club Dining Rm.,
inside the -Michigan Union, Ann
Arbor.
Rev. Billings will give his testimony
as to what the Holy Spirit has,
done in his life and work.
All Are Welcome. Please come.
Full Gospel Business Men Fellow-
ship International

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