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October 21, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-21

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER, 21, 1984

THE MICHI[C, A iv nA rr v

WENEDA, CTBR 1,194 - -W./ . vPra ±\.ZFr-i A kA

PAGE THREJT

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Nation Mourns Death of Ex-President Hooves

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14EW YORK (P)-Former Presi-
dent Herbert Clark Hoover died
at the age of 90 in his New York
apartment yesterday after a
lengthy illness.
Hoover's condition took a turn
for the worse Saturday when he
was stricken with a sudden and
massive internal hemorrhage from
the upper gastro intestinal tract.'
His two sons were with him in
his 31st floor suite in the Waldorf
Towers when he died.
Mourned and Respected
With his passing, the nation
mourned a man who won its
respect and admiration anew after
having been turned out of the
White House in 1932 by an elec-
torate that blamed him for
America's great depression.
Only one other President in
this century was refused re-
election by the voters. He was
Williaf Howard Taft, a Republican
like Hoover, who was defeated in
1912 after a single term in office.
Those close to Hoover said he
was stoic through his illness, never
complaining of pain.
Adams Lived Longer
Only one other former Presi-
dent, John Adams, lived longer.
Adams, the nation's second chief
executive, was 90 years and 8
months old when he died; Hoover
90 years and 2 months.
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He was sought out for counsel
by Democratic officeholders, as
well as Republicans. Countless
friends and admirers came to love
him as a man of immense sym-
pathies and gentle wit.
Even his grave illnesses of re-
cent times did not stop him from
leisurely conversations with call-
ers, and from keeping two secre-
taries at work with his writing.
Eight Secretaries
Until lately, it had taken eight
of them to keep up with his out-
put. But waning health slowed him
down.

[World Newsi
By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Some 2000 members
of a Teamsters Union council Sun-
day endorsed Democratic President
Lyndon B. Johnson and Republi-
can Gov. George Romney for re-
election.
SAIGON-Thirty-four Commu-
nist guerrillas were killed in a
helicopter-borne operation 80 miles
southwest of Saigon in the upper
Mekong Delta Monday, U.S. offi-
cials reported yesterday.
MOSCOW-Pravda, organ of the
Soviet Communist Party, yester-
day reaffirmed the new Soviet
leadership's intention to increase
Russia's military power. It indi-
cated, too, that the Soviets. may
be prepared to postpone an ideol-
ogical showdown with the Chinese
Communists.
LONDON Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson named 32 Junior min-
isters to the government yester-
day. Among them were three wom-
en, making a total of six women
in the new Labor Party govern-
ment compared with three in the
conservative former government.
DETROIT - The strike-bound
Detroit Free Press announced
Monday its support for the reelec-
tions of President Lyndon B. John-
son and Gov. George Romney in
the coming November elections.
** *
LONDON-The Labor govern-
ment was handed its first big in-
dustrial dispute last night when
talks on pay claims by 65,002
longshoremen collapsed. Labor
Minister Ray Gunter asked union
and management representatives
to meet with him today.

I He underwent surgery for a
abdominal cancer in August, 1962
made an astonishing comebac
from anemia brought on by in
testinal bleeding in June, 196
and recovered from a kidney hem.
orrhage complicated by a respira
tory infection in February, 1964.
Asked how he felt on his 90t
birthday, he said, "Too old."
Didn't Attend
He didn't make it to the 196
Republican convention in Sa
Francisco, although he had at
tended every other one since 1928
But "the grand old man of thi
Grand Old Party" sent a farewe
message, noting he had offere
his last word before, but "thisi
really it."
In that message, he said "peac
of the world is the first obligatio
of statesmen and government" an
that the "major world issue toda
is whether government shall b
the servant or master of men."
On his successive birthdays, i
his advancing years, Hoover al
ways had the same advise abou
longevity-keep up some kind o
productive work.
'Shrivel Up'
Otherwise you will shrivel u
into a nuisance to mankind," h
said.
Hoover's image was that o
"American individualism" and o
unswerving devotion to country.
"The soul of our America is it
freedom of spirit and mind it
man," he once said.
His range of public service in
cluded direction of massive relie
operations in World War I, food
administration at home, Secretary
of Commerce and then the presi
dency from 1929 to 1933.
Food Surveys
In later years, he made world
wide food surveys for the govern
ment, was chairman of the non
partisan Hoover Commission
studying executive branch opera
tions and carried on various.other
tasks.
While in the White House from
1929-33, Hoover's public image wa
that of an austere chief executive.
Those were the days of the "great
depression" when America's finas-
eial condition reached an all-time
low.
A shy man in public, Hoover in
private was a buoyant individual
whose conversation sparkled with
whimsical humor and witty sar-
casm. An associate recalled:
Never an Unkind Word
"I never heard him say an un-
kind word about any individual. He
would never attack a person as a
person. He attacked only prin-
ciples and policies. His greatest
pleasure was in his friendships."
A prodigious worker, Hoover's
energy was a constant source of
amazement to his. aides, even as
the years overtook him. They call-
ed his "the'chief"-an accolade
based on his sei'vice as chief of
operations during America's hu-

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the Roosevelt administration's
"New Deal" program. But when
the Japanese attacked Pearl Har-
bor, he urged the nation to back
Roosevelt to the limit.
Hoover, born Aug. 10. 1874, was
married in 1899 to Lou Henry,
whom he had met while they
were students at Stanford Univer-
sity. She died of a heart attack
in 1944.
They had two sons, Allan and
Herbert Jr.
Sympathies
The sympathies of the nation
and the world poured out today
at the death of Hoover.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
said:
"We have lost a wise American,
and the world has lost a human-
itarian citizen to all mankind."
He ordered a 30-day period of
national mourning with all Ameri-
can flags to fly at half mast at
federal buildings.
Mourn Passing
Leaders of both political faiths
mourned his passing and praised
him for the man many of them
had opposed in the political arena.
Adlai Stevenson, U. S. Ambas-
sador to the United Nations, de-
scribed Hoover as "one of the most
eminent public figures of his
time."
"His life was marked by broad
interests and many constructive
contributions," Stevenson said.
Unquenchable
Johnson said Hoover's sense of
public responsibility for the na-
tion and the world was "un-
quenchable" and stood "as an
example that will endure."
Barry Goldwater, Republican
presidential candidate, described
the former chief executive's death
as a profound loss to the Ameri-
can people and to the cause of
individual freedom and dignity
throughout the world.
"Herbert Hoover embodies and
came to symbolize the finest prin-,
ciples and qualities for which our
country stands," Goldwater said
in a statement issued at his Wash-
ington office.
Truman's Thoughts
From a Kansas City hospital
where he is recovering from in-,
juries suffered in a fall, Truman,,
80, wired Hoover's sons:
"I was deeply saddened by the
passing of your father. He was my
good friend and I was his. Presi-

THIS IS THE PHOTOGRAPH which ran in the Michigan Daily
November 7, 1929, the day following Hoover's election.

manitarian efforts of World War
I.
Before his political endeavors,
as a mining engineer, he amassed
a personal fortune estimated at
$6 million. In the White House, he
turned every dollar of his presi-
dential salary over to charity or
public service. He did the same
with the $25,000 a year pension
voted former Presidents in 1958
by Congress.
Reduced Number
Hoover's death reduced the
number of living former Presidents
to two-Democrat Harry S. Tru-
man and Republican Dwight D.
Eisenhower. Hoover served them
both as head of commissions for
the economical reorganization of
the government. Savings estimated
at $3 billion a year were the result
of his efforts.
In 1928, the GOP nominated
Hoover for the presidency, and he
won with an overwhelming plural-
ity of 6,375,747 votes in the race
against Gov. Alfred E. Smith of
New York.
A little more than seven months
after his inauguration, thedcoun-
try plunged into its worst depres-
sion, and one of the most trying
times a chief executive ever faced.
( Bitter Attacks
He was the target of bitter
attacks. Critics called him a "do-

HERBERT HOOVER

nothing" president, although he
toiled 20 hours a day in his ef-
forts to stem the spreading eco-
nomic crisis.
Franklin D. Roosevelt was
swept into office in 1932, heavily
defeating Hoover.'
He lashed out at the 20 years
of Democratic administrations
which followed his own, saying
that two decades of "misuse of'
power" had helped the Soviet'
Union, damaged the United States'
and contributed to the enslave-'
ment of millions.
Reinvigorated Governments
He also called for reinvigorated
state and local governments, and
a deflation of federal "bureau-
cratic empires." He said separate
functions of the executive, legis-
lative and judicial branches had
been "confused, corroded and
weakened."
In similar terms, he had blasted
BEAUTY SALON
609 S. FOREST
Call NO 8-8878

dent Hoover was a devoted public
servant and he will be forever re-
membered for his great humani-
tarian work."
Eisenhower, 74, said at his
Gettysburg, Pa., home:
"He has by his great service
earned the gratitude of America
and the entire free world. Every-
where, he was known as a friend
of humanity."
'Dedicated'
James Farley, the man who as
Democratic National Chairman
helped Franklin D. Roosevelt de-
feat Hoover in 1932 spoke of the
former President's "dedicated, un-
selfish" work on behalf of all
people.
"In his many years of public
activity, he made a contribution
to the well-being of mankind in
many areas of the world," Farley
said.
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of
New York said Hoover's life was
"an inspiration for all human
conduct" and said "the world is
poorer for his loss."
'Rare Individual'
Former Vice-President Richard
M. Nixon said in Augusta, Maine,
that Hoover was "one of those rare
individuals who lived to hear the
overwhelmingly favorable verdict
of history on his career."
"For 60 years he walked proudly
with the giants of the earth and
in the end won the affection and
respect of millions of people all

over the world," he added.
Mayor Robert F. Wagner of
New York City pointed to Hoover's
"unwavering dedication" to duty1
which he said made him "devoted
to those principles in which he
believed."I
Former GOP Gov. Thomas E.
Dewey of New York said "no man
of our century saved so many
humanbeings from starvation."
Hubert H. Humphrey, cam-
paigning in Tulsa, Okla., as the
Democratic vice-presidential can-
didate, said "he grew to even7
greater heights after the presi-
dency."
"I am grieved at the death of
my old friend, Herbert Hoover,
whom I have known and been as-
sociated with. since the days of
Woodrow Wilson," said Bernard
Baruch, adviser to Presidents.
"History will remember him with
the same high opinion in which
his countrymen have come to hold
him."
'Brilliant Career'
Neil MacNeill, a close friend and
aide of Hoover, said:
"A great American has ended
a brilliant career of service to his
fellow men. Above all, he was a
humanitarian. He fed more people
and saved more lives than any
other man in history."
Former West German Chancel-
lor Konrad Adenauer said that he
honored and esteemed Hoover. He
said Hoover was greatly respected
by the Germans.
Hoover's report on the situation
in Europe, particularly in con-
quered Germany, in the spring of
1947, contributed decisively to the
U. S. decision to help Europe and
Germany, he said.
Extends Sympathy
Queen Elizabeth II of Great
Britain instructed her ambassador
in Washington to convey a mes-
sage of sympathy to Johnson on
the death of Hoover. Court sources
said the queen also directed that
similar messages of condolences be
extended to Hoover's sons.
Hoover's body will lie in state
for two days at St. Bartholomew's
Episcopal Church on Park Avenue.
Then it will be taken to Wash-
ington for a service in the rotunda
of the Capitol Building.
Burial will be in a national park
on the site of a small cottage
where Hoover was born in West
Branch, Iowa.

The
Michigan
Memorial-
Phoenix
Project
announces
The Fourth
Annual
Dewey F.
Fagerburg
Lecture
DR. HANS
BETHE
--physicist
-recipient of the
AEC's Enrico
Fermi Award

-U.S. delegate
the Geneva

to

negotiations on
a nuclear test
ban

:!i,

Evenings by Appointment

s s

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ISRAELI
Folk Dancing Group

-
It's No
t
S TRICK
f
To Send,
OR
TREAT
A Friend To
One of the Many Great!
HALLOWEEN GREETING CARDS
FROM
312 S. State 1203 S. University

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Thurs., 7:30 p.m.
OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED

registration fee
for the semester:,

Hillel members-$1.50
others-$2.00

will speak
on
DISARMA-
MENT
and
STRATEGIC
STABILITY
TONIGHT
8 P.M.
Rackham
Lecture Hall

or single admission . . . 5Cc
IN HILLEL SOCIAL HALL
1429 Hill Street

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
~f~f~PHOTO CONTEST

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, , .,w.,.. - ..,,. .
i': : "i:i:vY

U

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THEME: THE UNIVERSITY IN PERSPECTIVE
FINISHED BLACK & WHITE PHOTOS WITH
CAPTION - NO SIZE SPECULATION
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS

1st PRIZE $25.00
2nd PRIZE $15.00

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