100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSIAY, OCTUBER,-15, 1964

'S HE MICHIGAN DAILY.

THRDAOTOE 5,164TE MIHG N AL

British Go to Polls

Today

LONDON (iP)-British voters
elect a new 630-seat House of
Commons today, deciding whether
to keep Prime Minister Sir Alec
Douglas-Home's Conservatives at
the helm or to replace them with
the Labor Party, led by Harold
Wilson.
The. race appeared so close that

not as much as there should have
been. He has accused the Con-
servatives of allowing the country
to stagnate and campaigned on
the slogan: "Let's go with Labor!"
Conservatives want ot keep a
British nuclear deterrent, first
through bombers, later through
Polaris missiles bought from the

Eisenhower
Doubts Role
In Viet Nam
GETTYSBURG (/) - Former
President Dwight D. Eisenhower,
in an impromptu news conference
on his 74th birthday, yesterday
doubted that he would head a
peace mission to troubled Viet
Nam.
He was asked about news re-

:

TWe0 DISSENT:
Southern Governors Baek
State Control of School

World
Ro"n

PAGE THRER
News
d"p

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (/)-Gov.
George C. Wallace of Alabama
won support of Deep South gov-
ernors today in his fight against
federal court jurisdiction of school
affairs but a vote of endorsement
was blocked by two border state
leaders at the Southern Gover-
nors' Conference.

both parties were worried. But United States.

bookies-legal in Britain-still
were giving odds that Labor would
win.
Prime Minister Douglas-Home
and Wilson made last-minute.
pleas for support last night and
trumpeted conflicting claims of
victory. Their tone and the wor-
ried expressions of their aides in-
f dicated, however, that they were
none to sure.
Prime Ministry
Wilson, 48, one-time Oxford
University faculty member, and
Douglas-Home, 61, a former
nobleman, are rivals for the Prime
Ministership. The job goes to the
man whose party wins control of
the House of Commons.
Either Wilson or Douglas-Home
will be the person the winner of
the United States presidential
election Nov. 3 will have to deal
with on an intimate basis in West-
ern alliance matters.
A puzzling campaign, Britain's
most disorderly this century, pro-
duced contradictory clues as to
the outcome of voting.
28 of 36
About 28 million men and wom-
en, out of an eligible 36 million
voters, will chose the persons they
want to respresent them in Par-
liament for the next five years.
The polls will remain open from
7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Balloting is on a district basis.
The voter designates the man he
wants to represent him in Parlia-
ment. Wilson and Douglas-Home
get votes only in thier own dis-
tricts.
The field contains .1,700 candi-
dates - Conservatives, Laborites
and Liberals with i scattering of
splinter group nominees.
Opinion Polls
Public opinion polls, fluctuations
in the stock exchange plus endless
rumors have indicated the tide
was running first toward the La-
bor party and then toward the
Conservatives.
Throughout the campaign how-
ever, bookmakers quoted odds
making the Labor Party the f a-
vorite. A person must put up 11
pounds to win 4 if he picks a
Labor Party victory. For every
pound put on the Conservatives a
bettor stands to win two.
The campaign touched on for-
eign affairs and defense matters
but basically was fought on a
bread and butter issue.
Douglas-Home has said 13 years
of unbroken Conservative rule has
given Britons full employment and
the highest standard of living they
ever have known.
Some Growth
Wilson has conceded there has
been some economic growth but

Labor wants to give up the in-
dependent British deterrent. It
proposes all nuclear weapons be
put under joint Allied control and
wants to strengthen conventional
forces for NATO defense.
Taxation
In taxation, Conservatives pro-
pose to continue to reform the tax
system both for companies and in-
dividuals.
Labor wants a major overhaul of
the whole tax system with higher
unearned incomes carrying a
greater share of the tax.
Conservatives also want to
maintain an annual growth rate
of four per cent, with economic
planning by a partnership of gov-
ernment, management and unions.
They aim to double the 1954
standard of living by 1979 and
want to complete the denational-
ization of the steel industry.
Over Four Per CentF
In this area Labor proposes to
reach at least a four per cent
growth rate and asks creation ofI
a Ministry of Economic Affairs
to draw up a national plan to in-
crease investments, expand ex-
ports and reduce nonessential im-
ports.
It also asks an incomes policy
covering profits, dividends and
rents as well as wages, to be
achieved through cooperation with
unions. Labor would nationalize
steel completely, and also have
public ownership of water supply
and road transport.
Also proposed: publicly owned
Driver Testing.
Center.
at the
Michigan Union,
Room 3-X,
TO DAY

BRITISH PRIME MINISTER Sir Alec Douglas-Home (left) and
Labor party leader Harold Wilson are heading their respective.
parties in a tight struggle for a parliamentary majority in today's
British elections. Both men claimed victory, but polls give Labor
a slight edge. ,

ports that Republican Presidential Closing their three-day South-
candidate Barry Goldwater had ern Governors' Conference, a
suggested such a mission headed majority voted for Wallace's pro-
by Eisenhower if the Republican posal of a Constitutional amend-
ticket were elected. ment giving states exclusive con-
Eisenhower said he had heard trol over public schools.
the reports, but "I doubt if they But under the rules, a unani-
want anyone emeritus, either oos vote was required.
emeritus military or emeritus Loud No'wh
President. I think they probably Opposing Wallace with loud
would want a younger, more ac- "no" votes were Gvs. Edward T.
five fellow.,, Breathitt of Kentucky and Elbert
tiv ellow.N. Carvel of Delaware. Gov. John
Eisenhower said he had never B. Connally of Texas, who was
seen such a personal political cam- elected chairman, said he did not
paign as the present one. vote either way.
Referring to the campaign be- The governors voted unanimous-
tween President Lyndon B. John- ly for a resolution by Gov. Paul
son and his Republican challenger, B. Johnson of Mississippi support-
he said it was unfortunate that ing a constitutional change to
"they are not debating issues." allow factors other than popula-
Eisenhower said he planned to Lion to be used in apportioning
campaign for the Republican legislatures.a
ticket in Texas, Oklahoma, Kan- Electionyear olitics dominat-
sas Misoui, hio Ne Jesey edthe conference, composed of 16
sas, .Missouri, Ohio, New Jersey, Democrats and one Republican.
and perhaps one brief appearance Most of the governors shared the
in New York City. view that President Lyndon B.
He agreed that the polls all Johnson will carry a big majority
looked discouraging to Republicans of the Southern states.
at this point, but said they looked Foreign Trade
just as bad for former President Another resolution adopted by
Harry S. Truman before he was the governors called for a govern-
elected in 1948. ment study of what effect foreign

By The Associated Press
CAIRO-A secret peace con-
ference aimed at settling the wo-
year-old Yemeni civil war will
begin soon, authoritative sources
in contact with both warring fac-
tions said tday. The conference
would include representatives of
the overthrown Imman (king)
and President Abdullah Sallal as
well as Saudi Arabians and Egyp-
tions who support the two camps.
The most likely date is Oct. 20
and the neutral site will be either
Beirut, Asmara or Port Sudan,
the sources said.
* *
ST. LOUIS-A drawn-out battle
to allow women to serve in the
top governing body of the Episco-
pal Church has met another-
but hairbreadth-defeat. However
the decision barely squeaked
through--by the narrowest margin
yet in the past six successive con-
ventions in which the question has
arisen.
* * .
MOSCOW - The three Soviet
Cosmonauts from the world's first
group space flight met wish scien--
tists today, went through medical
checks, and said later they were
ready for another cosmic trip.
Speculation swelled, however, that
one of the passengers felt ill, cut-
ting short the flight of space ship
Voskhod (Sunrise) after 16 orbits
of the Earth.

GOV. GEORGE WALLACE

factories in development areas, the
end of monopolies, controling mer-
gers and takeover bids.
In education, the Conservatives
propose suitable education or
training for every boy or girl up
to 18, promising to raise the
school-leaving age from 15 to 16.
They advocate a priority drive for
more teachers and new schools.
Laborites would abolish the 11-
plus qualifying examination fori
children to enter grammer school.S
They would make secondary edu-
cation comprehensive; raising the
school-leaving age to 16 and re-
ducing the size of classes to 30.

They want to integrate private
schools into the state system and
to expand higher education.
On the technology issue, Con-
servatives propose new research
agencies and government help for
new industrial techniques. They
would modernize methods, markets
and machines.
Labor calls for a national plan
to mobilize technology. It wants
a major change in attitude to-
ward science and new ways of
putting modern techniques into in-
dustry. Laborites propose a min-
istry of technology and revision
of training facilities.

trade has on jobs under the anti-
poverty program. The governors
also endorsed a one-price cotton
policy on a permanent basis.
The governors also urged Con-
gress to enact legislation "to en-
sure the development of a strong
petroleum industry and adequate
reserves," and supported a formula
distribution of federal research
grants to educational institutions
and allocation of some funds for
general research.

It

I

AT SABBATH SERVICES
Friday, October 16 at 7 p.m.

Employees

& Non-Emolovees

ST UDE NTS for ROMN EY
IMPORTANT Meeting
Thurs., Oct. 15 7:30 p.m.
NEW MEMBERS INVITED
(Keep Michigan On The Move)
Michigan Union-Rm. 3D

_ _ t ,

;;

r

JOIN
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
STUDENT EMPLOYEES'
UNION
FISHBOWL

Ir
V
I{
Ii
I
I
it

PROF. PAUL ILIE
"THE ROCKWEL L EVENING-
in RETROSPECT"
Discussion led by Dr. Herman Jacobs

k,

I

ALL ARE WELCOME

1429 Hill Street

Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
B'NAI B'RITH HILL.EL FOUNDATION

y'htiys

K

WE NEED
TYPISTS and STENOS!
Kelly Girl Service, Inc.
518 E. William, Ann Arbor.
662l-5559

.. t .,., i } , . v., . :r :x} .::.. : ..... . ...:... ':'.: \ .. ...... :.. i.. <.v...:i : v. '...ii:: ir. t'i is :.:...r::: n:Y :i
... .."... ... .... r..v.. ... ... M1i:: <::.. .: x.. :i:k">: x '::::'i:::::'r' ..
r ... '.... ... .. 1 .... ... .. .n. ..... ,.:.... :. ..n .. ...... C .v r.., :.
Y i .. f .... ... .....r... .. :..' . r %'..... v: r::::. .v ":::::: ......: ....................: .". ...: i:' ii: i :Y 'tir .
.{z. ,%" :fi3'..k..fi}..;x vv:x::"r..:..: ::.sk +... .;":"y!;;:: ..::.;.
:..,..::: ::.ar f <...:A., -... r:.. :."x,..r..x;:U ... .. ::: _ 'ts:+ .... :: rit.C,.:cS ws.:ctiR.:;i !k?,''ii
:yj- - - tit :
,:: ir:. .;i
itik
-{ f}- :v.
::ti 2
" +,.
t r;>;:.:::i
u I
4i: r l:y;
k
t ..
%':
,,1
}ash
t w#
.: . t
''
> _
rX
'::h
tyr }::i
.:..'i.
+< A , r
ta ;:.
fiY{. ....,it.
,r
rr . ..
fff.":?
Y+:
8 e .m.-4.:30 p.m. M
r
r?" }
C i s , i
::i:r:
;
f r ::.;:f
:<fi > :::::; i
h.h.... . vv.:Yf}
ry:yi : , .,' . :
i.. fti: i::':;
if1: ...
f rvv::: "ir.,
' r is
:mss.? :';.
f :i S ,};
f, :r r
" f ;:;i:;:ti
.:: .:r<.;
,. ::>:<.:
v , i ::
° Available Engin Arch, Diag, ;r:
:{:;
:: .::::
" { Alumnr Hall, Student Publ cat ons -" --
" and the campus Bookstores ' .:r}r:
,:;:5:
.,
1
>}r::::.
:::. <t\1:
'fr; k 2 . _.... _ ... ..... .. ..... .. .... ....... ... ................ ........ .... ... .... ..... ..: ,. ....x.. ::x+.iir:>"s:;o:: r :i" r:>. ":, ::";>::.ana">::= .:<;": ,;cr,} s;+:;
.5....::..........,: ,......... _. ......._ .. ., ....-:..,... ..... ......... ..... :..:............. v..............:. .. .. ,::....::::::.x.:, :...v.., .ic:crro:rr+t"o- + rr : .:tC';.
......F ...: .....:......M:::xii:. ..:..:.; ....
........ .. ........ ... .f . : :.........v ..................
..... n .. ..... .............1..........:$ 4i:i:, ...:.
.......{.......... fv......... . ,.. .f ... .. .:.v:::
. ... ........... .. ... .... , . t.. ......... ................::.:; .
: .. .:...:x .......... _ .......... ... ..:...... .. .:.........:.. ....r... .........::::. :::.r.:::::. ...
... .. ...........r ... ... .....:........... ....... ........r ...:.............::.: v.:.v.vz.n ..,. .,. : ........: w ::: k........::..::.: :::.. .......::.. ....::...:: ":: :
:r ":: :. : :r.1v "::X::::: '{: ::::...:::: r:::::. .:::+. ::: .vf.;;. :. :.1fr...::.:. :s ............:4... Fv... rfi ....}............ {:........
..¢:.r..,t........rv..r......r ..............................t...v......vb$:"i::?i:...................................n......,.....a............fr. : ?:vnv:.v:}::nom:::: ".:v::nn.:...:..... .::,.::..{,......... t................n....t.:. ....+."::"S:y}iii:!;?"i;::::i :?<>.::':

(

Y
. l
x i ;:
/
i {(. f
; z 1
y'" t
.4.. z.: . g
" r ,:
: N
f .' .J .
r9 : ti's d' K 4 v
" ? " 11 .' >. y rf. .}ro } t "1
s T:.} JI{ E y. {
y ! ~ S
': .
...
yi, .H i i..
} ... ;v
'\ i9 $} <} '> p
Y,
{. ..
y, r t
.- ." ) sky? y¢' Yr .d, ".:
+ 'ai

_ .

BUSAD, INC.
MEMO
TO: ALL STUDENTS
AND FRIENDS
FROM: BUS. AD. SCHOOL
Subject: Bus. Ad
OPEN-OPEN
TEXT
following Purdue Game
Sat., Oct. 17,
4-6 p.m.
Rock-n-Roll by
INVICTAS
Refreshments

< 3 v :
".}

r

,. + .
t ,:

/

Y ..r ' ' S ..
the
°'' .E
C 1 Th

r

A

here from
Continent
urope craft
asual coats

I

SGC Constituent Assembly
-VOICE YOUR OPINIONS
-HEAR THE ISSUES

I

r
t
'x
z<s
4:
, :
,;
JKi'
"'
b Y// /

A.

Your.passpor to winter warmth with an easy.
Continental flair...water-repellent double-faced
wool coats, imported from West Germany to
spend an active winter here. Sizes 8 to 16
A. Back-belted walking coat with waist-high back pleat.
Olive with contrasting piping. 39.95
B. Three-quarter length shirt tail spectator coat
with a wool pile lining, detachable hood.
Wine with contrasting piping. 55.00

' Overcrowding of dorms and unfair room and board increases
' Low wages
* High rents and long leases
Lack of educational facilities
4 Future Dlannina

.: - l

fl

i

l : l I ,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan