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October 13, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Seeks SGC

S NOTE: This is the He believes that Council mem-
series of articles giving bers should take the time to con-
fthe' opinions and back-
the candidates currently tact the administration before
or Student Government acting on many issues. "If we are
Sfamiliar with the University's
DAVID BLOCK opinions and operations in a cer-
tain area then we will have a
mbers of Student Gov- broader base on which to plan our
)uncil are not adequate- own legislation in that area."
hing' a n d following Brook predicts that, if the mem-
oposals that have come bers of SGC take the time to re-
body." establish communication with the.
administration and with the stu-
dent body, then in the process
Council will also acquire adiriini,-
tration support and respect.
Overworked
He says that those candidates
who would like to restructure
>s , Council's commnittee system have
overlooked the basic cause of the
committees' failures. '"There is
nothing wrong with the present
committee ,framework. If the
I chairmen and individual members
of these groups were performing
their duties scrupulously, then
they would be enjoying a normal
- degree of effectiveness."
Brook says that the SGC com-
mittees have been extremely lax
in their efforts recently, and that
they never will be able to func-
tion successfully unless SGC gives
them stronger direction and con-
tinually prods them to fulfill their
obligations.
BRDirect Recruiting
UGLAa BROOK He suggests that Council should
been the primary rea- employ a more direct means of
Duncil's apparent inef- recruiting people to run for SGC'
in recent months, ac- and to serve in the committee
o incumbent Douglas system. "Council members should
a candidate in the cur- get out during the semester and
election. talk to a wide variety of students.
Brook stresses that "we should
go to these groups and explain
exactly what SGC is doing. We
should tell them exactly in what
" Ai areas SGC needs help from the
in Aim of student body and then encourage
them to "begin working for Coun-
cil in some capacity that interests
le Grants them." He believes that only by
such aggressive methods of re-
of confidence" has been cruitment will SGC be able to
develop between the solicit large pockets of interest
community and those and support on campus.
for the award and ad- Brook is currently the executive
n of research grants, vice-president of SGC and in his
am N. Hubbard of the yearon Council has also served as
hool said 'recently in treasurer of the body. He is past
chairman of the Young Republi-
r presented at the 92nd can club and has also served as a
r xfrese state officer in the organization.

THE UNIVERSITY'S MEN'S GLEE CLUB, which has played to enthusiastic audiences around the
world, announced its 1964-65 schedule recently. This picture is. an 1870 photograph of one of the
earliest glee clubs. This year's group has slated University, Big Ten and other engagements.
Men's Gle Club Annouces Schedule

DOt
This has
son for C
fectiveness
cording to
Brook, '65,
rent SGC
Hubs
S lit
Scien
A "crisis c
allowed to
scientific
responsible
ministratioj
Dean Willi
Medical Sc
New York.
In a pape
annu l m

By MICHAEL DEAN
The University Men's Glee
Club, directed by Prof. Phillip
Duey of the music school, has
announced its schedule for the
1964-65 season.
Major appearances will include.
a joint concert with the Univer-
sity of Illinois' glee club on Nov.
7, a television spot on the Oct. 29
Perry Como show and a 14-day
West Coast tour beginning April
28.
In addition, publicity director
Gary Miller said, the club is one
of two United States college groups
invited to appear in New York at
the International Music Festival,
to be held in conjunction with the
World's Fair next fall..
Past Accormplishments
Past accomplishments 'in ad-
Stuents W ll
lo Live in For

di ion to local appearances include
te evision performances, a motion
picture stint and several Euro-
pean tours. Miller said that the
highest achievement in the club's
history has been the two first
place victories scored in the In-
ternational Musical Eisteddfod in
Llangollen, Wales.
The club was the first American
group to garner a first place vic-
tory in the Welsh festival.
The group, advised by James
Shortt, director of state services.
for the public relations depart-
ment, is a self-supporting, stu-
dent-managed organization. Try-
outs this year added 35 men,

mission to membership in the
group, character and personality
being almost equally important.
Of the total membership only
from 8 to 10 men are music school
students. The majority of the
group; Miller added, are not music
specialists.
The student officers are respon-'
sible for the managing of the con-'
certs and tours along with their'
usual duties. Officers for this year
are Geoffrey Gilbert, '66, presi-
dent; Robert Strozier, '65, vice-'
president; Lloyd Mistele, '65BAd,
business manager; and Gary Mil-
ler, '65E, publicity director.

Study Dying
To Aseertain
Better Care
By CHRISTINE LINDER
"An objective study of dying
patients may be slightly inhuman,
but it does provide a guide to their
treatment that may be more use-
ful than random personal observa-
tions."
' Dr. John M. Hinton, the senior
lecturer in psychiatry at Middle-
sex Medical School in London in
a recent speech at the University,
explained his method as one of
minimum intrusion into the lives
of sick or dying persons,
Hinton studied two groups of
hospitalized patients, one of which
doctors had predicted would not
live more than six months and
aitother "consisting of patients
whom the doctors expected to re-
cover.
Hours of Listening
'Hours of sitting at the bedsides
of these patients and listening to
them talk gave Hinton informa-
tion about the amount of pain,
anxiety, and depression they ex-
perienced.
'One finding that Hinton said
he had not expected was that
cancer does not cause as much-
pain as heart or renal failure. He
also recommended that patients
receive large amounts of pain-
killers at the outset of their ill-
ness. When confidence is built up
this way in the beginning, in-
creased doses of pain-killers are
sometimes unnecessary as the ill-
ness'progresses, he said.
Religious faith and church at-
tendance,are related to the amount
of anxiety the patient experiences,
Hinton said. Persons who have no
religious faith and do not attend
church and those who have strong.
religious faith and attend church
regularly are significantly less
anxious than those who describe'
themselves as having "some" re-'
ligious faith.
Before Fifty.
"If you are going to die, it is'
best not to do it while you are
under 50." Younger patients tend
to experience more pain, anxiety,
and depression than older patients,;
Hinton found.
Although the majority of dying
patients had not been told that
they were dying, fewer of them:
than the other group expressed the
belief tha.t they would recover
completely. Moreover, none of the
patients in the control group
which were expected to recover
expressed the belief that death was
probable or certain.

bringing the present membership Player,
to 81. Drogjf p
Varied Membership a'
Miller emphasized that musicalaritedMepauss O per
talent alone does not assure ad-
Mozart's opera "The Magic
Flute" will replace the previously
aStrauss' "Die Fledermaus" on the
" University Players' 1964-65 play-

An exhibition titled "Designed
for Production: The Craftsman's
Approach," organized by The
Museum of. Contemporary Crafts,
New York, will be shown at the'
art museum in Alumni Memorial
Hall throughout October.
The objects in the collection
were singled out from a vast num-
ber of massproduced and limited
production items as representative
of the contributions of the Ameri-!
can craftsman to industrial de-j
sign. ,f
TUESDAY, OCT.13
Bucket drive begins to raise
money to support individuals fron
Anin Arbor who are doing civil.
rights work in Mississippi. -
7:15 p.m.-Tryouts for the Uni-
versity Players production of "The
Peacemaker" begin in 2518 Frieze
Bldg. N
8 p.m.-Prof. George Panchaud
of the University of Lusanne, Swit-
zerland, will speak on "European

Elite: Their Selection in Secon-
dary Education" in the East Con-
ference Rm., Rackham Bldg.
8 p.m.-George Lincoln Rock-
well, head of the American Nazi
Party, will speak at Hill Aud.
WEDNESDAY, OCT.14
4:15 p.m.-A meeting to discuss
restructuring of the University
Senate will be held in Aud. A.
7:15 p.m. - Tryouts for "The
Peacemaker" will continue in 2518
Frieze Bldg. _
7:30 p.m.-Rev. Peter Chang, a
Wisconsin Synod Lutheran mis-
sionary, will speak on work being
done in Hong Kong at the Dar-
lington Lutheran Church, 3545
Packard Rd.
8 p.m.-The PTP .presents the
APA in Jean Giraudoux's "Judith"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Warsaw Philhar-
monic; Wladyslaw Kedra, pianist;
Stanislaw Wislocki, conductor,
will perform in Hill Aud.

! , } s:

.

',

reigniCountry

bill.
"The Magic Flute" will be pre-
sented on March 17-21 in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

a allt~ mee ing oz e mer1'.'can !
Public Health Association, Iub-
bard said that "no set of regula-
tions or elaboration of business
and fiscal devices can substitute
for this understanding, which
must be based on confidence."
"The very word 'grant' is un-
derstood differently in many cases
by the grantor, the recipient in-
stitution and the individual.
scientist," Hubbard said. "The
grantor has in mind the solving
of a practical problem in health
while the institution frequently'
looks upon the grant as a means
of supporting a segment of the
much broader program of the total
institution," he explained.
"The scientist views the grant
as a recognition of his personal
capacity to undertake a scientific
effort which has been cenceived
by him," Hubbard said.
"There then develops a logical
problem' created' by the intent of
the research appropriation and the
means by which this intent, is
served by the scientist," he said.

Stud ents use
An electronic device has made:
it possible for a class of about
24 students in the architecture and
design school to quickly evaluate
their own projects.
The machine, which is called
a group mean indicator, is es-
sentially a series of individual re-
sponse panels connected to a cen-
tral recorder. It was developed
about ten years ago by Prof. Aarre
K. Lahti, of the architecture and
design college,, and Uolevi Lahti.'
It was intended as a consumer re-;
search tool for arriving at in-
stantaneous statistical evaluations.
Lahti says that the machine
makes more objective . evaluation
possible because the instructor is
out of the picture. "After all it
isn't the purpose of the student to
please the instructor."

By DAVID ROGERS
The Experiment in International
Living will provide University stu-
dents and faculty with an op-
portunity to learn about a foreign
society by actually living in it
this summer..'.
This is the experiment's first
year on campus. It is under the
direction of Evart W. Ardis, direc-
tor of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-
tion.
Group members are assigned to
a "family" for six to eight weeks,
and live with it, travelling and
socializing with its members and
learning the customs and tradi-
tions of the country.
Group members, mainly stu-
dents, must be at least 16 years
old and proficient in the coun-
try's language. Leaders, usually
graduate students and faculty
members, must be between 25
and 45 years old, American-born
and educated, with prior exper-
ience in foreign living.
After qualifying for the country
of their choice, group members
participate in special orientation
programs. The trip abroad is made
by either chartered plane or boat,
Ardis said.
Group leaders live independently
once abroad, but are responsible
for the group members' safety,
health and welfare.
1 1"

countries, including seven coun- The opera is an allegorical fan-
tries in Africa such as Tangan- tasy, telling of the adventures of
yika and Algeria; six in Asia, in- a prince and imprisoned maiden.
cluding India and the Philippines; Season ticket subscribers will
Poland, the USSR and Yugo- not have to exchange the tickets
slavia in Eastern Europe; and al- they now hold for performances on
most all countries in Western these dates, and times for the
Europe, the Middle East, and Latin performances will be the same as
America. those originally scheduled for the
Strauss production.
The cost of the experiment to Other productions in the Uni-
group members ranges from ap- versity Players' program are "The
proximately $475 in Mexico and Imaginary Invalid" which will be
$750 in countries such as Costa given November 4-7, "The Peace-
Rica and Guatemala to $1075 in maker" by Carl Oglesby, "Uncle
France and Sweden, $1200 in the Vanya" by Checkhev, "Chez
Philippines, and $1275 in the Torpe," by Billetdoux, and "Gal-
USSR. iieo" by Brecht.

)

The experiment operates in .41

I

i

r

« , ,

Dial 668-6416
ENDING WEDNESDAY
Shows at 7 and 9 P.M.

Dial 5-6290
Every year..every kind
of man-woman excitement
rocks the explosive word of
re

"A BOLD AND EXCITING FILM!"
CARMEN AMAYA " ANTONIO GADES ~-*sl~ycrowhr,
FILMED IN BARCELONA IN BRIlLIANT COLOR - Amtj SIGMA iti RELEASE
STARTING THURSDAY
"THE YOUNG LOVE RS"

ENDING
TONIGHT

rE~ ISE

DIAL
2-6264

WE OFFER YOU'
Gore Vidal's
"THE BEST MAN"
Thurs., Oct. 15 thru Sat., Oct. 17
Trueblood Auditorium
TICKETS FOR SALE DAILY AT THE
BOX OFFICE-10 A.M. to 5 P.M. .
Phone 764-1538
Season Tickets are still available at the Box Office
for the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's Season
PREMIE RE WED. 8:00!
PREMIERE - OCT. 14, 8 P.M.
Ameican Prem/ire
JUDITH

4 p i~ 5 r°
o ti $o¢p5
K p to
p t x
E K pK ,41p
"CO
,,
O 7
S
, ,.
° 'C'
, , {f
_
ti
, i
,

i

The
T
motionp
of the ye

The Greatest Find Since Jean Harlow
:...x
;ict., , .',

WAE DSNY'
. SOJJ=
TECHICOOR
" titting
BUR IES BULA BND HRRYCAEY LAI'A ATENr BBf DJSOU
TEiHIC0p® WitD., , .TEN1OO

i
i

MICNAEL CALLAN-DEANDJONES-TEIYSAVALAS
BARARAEDEN-STEFANIEPOWERS AYSEVENS
at6 E ' NIES-"GE0,R6E SE:6A- x

I

7

I

the EMU players present
TIlE FOURPOSTER by Jan de hartog

october 14-18
quirk auditorium
curtain 8:00

tickets $1.25
box office open
12:45-4:30 daily

GEORGE LINCOLN.

,[.

phone HU 2-3453 for reservations
EMU PLAYERS SEASON COUPON BOOKS

ROCKWELL

F-.

i

including.

AUSTI N
DIAMO N D

the fourposter
the miracle worker
the devil's disciple
south pacific
plus
six great films

remain on sale
for only
$4.0
until october 18

Head of American Nazi Party

1209 S. University 663-7151

II

Ii

. .

I

DOUGLAS STEERE
Professor of Philosophy, Haverford College
Vatican Council Observer for the
American Friends will discuss the
VATICAN It ECUMENICAL COUNCIL

is speaking TONIGHT
at Hill Auditorium
8 P.M.

II

II

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