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October 04, 1964 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-04

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OC OBER 4, 1964

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCi'OBER 4,1964

1.. -A

F

ARTS & LETTERS

By David Garelick

McCurdy: 'Mass Erotica?'

The Week To Come:
A Campus Calendar

PROVIDE TRAINING:
Colleges Enter Anti-Poverty Battle

4

By LAURA GODOFSKY
Collegiate Press Service

f .

On a rainy afternoon in a lo-
cal coffee shop recently a tall,
bearded balladier sat comfortably
and, constantly pushing up his
ever-sliding glasses, spun an al-
most endless tale of experience and
witty speculation.
Ed McCurdyl has been singing
in Ann Arbor's only folk mus-
sic establishment, the Golden
Vanity, for the last two weeks.
He has been singing old, bawdy
and beautiful ballads for the past
18 years and recorded 20 records.;
His most popular ones have been
the sometimes-deceiving "Songs
of Dalliance."
McCurdy has recoraed a total
of six "erotic" records, four of
them in the Dalliance series, and
all of them misinterpreted by
those falsely capitivated by the'
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covers. la ance songs were ac-
tually written in 17th century Eng- ED McCURDY
land, though the lewd, sensuous
covers on the records would lead ly been much of an instrument for
one to draw different conclusions. social comment. The spoken word
According to McCurdy, the sur- is better for that."
face impression, "erotica for the Not entirely against the idea of
masses," is a false one. "It's too protest in songs, however, McCur-
bad the covers on those things dy praised a few points in the
are so horrible," he said, and went young singers such as Dylan and
on to describe some of the "dis- Baez, though he was critical of
appointed people" who judged the some.
record by its cover. "These singers have a lot of po-
The songs are primarly of his- tential," he said, "but I'm not
torical and musical interest, Mc- satisfied with them; but I'm not
Curdy said, yet somehow the con- satisfied with myself either."
cept of "erotica for the masses" He explained his dissatisfaction
always gets confused with the by saying that the development of
more aesthetic one, a singer, including himself, was
"This is unfortunate," he said, a mutual process of growing,
"because in this country sex is learning and passing on. "People
not accepted. It's talked about a have to grow, or else they stag-
hell of a lot, and a lot of males nate," he emphasized. "This is a
are driven into it. But they're problem for all artists."
rarely satisfied and become only McCurdy considers himself more
predatory lovers." of an artist than a strict enter-
When asked if there was any tainer and. hopes that he can
value in protesting this through raise the level of the music he per-
folk' music, McCurdy replied, forms to a form of art.
"Folk songs have never done a "I'd like to sing in every lib-
lot for society. It has never real-; eral arts college in North Amer-
U -

ica," he said. "I wish I could
show that folk music is an art
form and not just vaudeville. It'sE
not that music isn't casual enter-
|tainment, but it's a lot more than
that.''
He spoke of the importance of a i
place where small audiences couldY
assemble, like the Vanity. "After |
all," he said, "folk singers needi
audiences. There are only a few
who can stand to sing for each
other.",
Asked if the audiences were
helping to make folk music some-7
thing greater, or if they were mak-j
ing it assume any one direction,
McCurdy replied, "Folk music has1
no real direction. The people have+
to go in their own directions. The
music follows."
He cited Dylan and his reputa-
tionas the so-called "voice of his
generation" as an example, saying
that he was no more of a voice
and had no more direction than
anyone else.
McCurdy said that there have
been few truly effective voices of{
protest in this country. "A lot of
protest singers just get up and tell
I you what they don't like about this
country and they damn the whole
society because it's not any good.
"Well sure it's no good. We
don't claim to have a perfect so-
ciety and we never will, but if
you're going to yell about it, you
might try to do something about
f it, too. There are a- lot of bad
things about America, but there
are a lot of -good things also, and
like it or not, it's your citizenship
and the hope of the world may
very well lie there."
The bells of Burton Tower
struck the hour and McCurdy
mentioned that he was going to
be late for a concert if he didn't
stop talking.
Enrollment
Rises Choke
Universities
Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-Enrollment In
the nation's colleges and universi-
ties has nearly doubled in the last
15 years and may nearly double
again by 1975.
A record-breaking 4.8 million
students will be in college this
fall, according to United States
Office of Education estimates. In
1949, some 2.5 million students
were enrolled,
This fall's. enrollment repre-
sents an increase of some 300,000
students over last year's total and
is about 600,000 students larger
than 1962's. Estimates of 1975
enrollment run above 8.5 million.
Almost half of the- record-
breaking 2.3 million students who
were graduated from high school
last spring will be entering col-
leges and universities this fall.
Unless teacher loads are sub-
stantially increased, the huge
enrollments will necessitate hir-
ing an additional 18,000 college
teachers this year, the education
office estimates. This would mean
a 5 per cent jump over last year's
college teaching staff of 352,000.

SUNDAY, OCT. 4
3 p.m. and 8 p.m.-The APA
Repertory Cpmpany will perform
in Brendan Behan's "The Host-
age" in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
3 p.m.-The University Student
Employes Union will hold a meet-
ing in the third floor conference
room of the Michigan Union. Or-
ders of business will include sign-
ing up members, ratification of
the constitution, election of offi-
cers, and determination of bar-
gaining demands.
8:30 , p.m. - Professors Eugene
Bossart and Charles Fisher of the
music school will give a duo-piano'
recital with the Chamber Orches-j
tra under the direction of Prof.
Gilbert Ross of the music school
in Rackham Aud.
MONDAY, OCT. 5
4 p.m. - The literary college
Steering Committee will hold its
first open meeting of the year in
Rm. 3B of the Michigan Union
in order to acquaint interested
students with the functions of the
committee and to discuss any aca-
demically related problems within
the college.
'The focus of the meeting will
be on a critical evaluation of the
present foreign language distribu-
tion requirements.
8 p.m.-President Harlan Hatch-
er will address the annual fall
convocation of faculty and staff
on events of the past year and
plans for the current one in Rack-
ham Aud.
Distinguished Faculty Achieve-
ment Awards and Distinguished
Service Awards for assistant pro-
fessors and instructors will also
be presented.
8 p.m.-Prof. Louella Cable of
the zoology department will speak
on "The Growth and Development
of White Fish Reared in Captiv-
ity" in the West Conference Rm.
of the Rackham Bldg. at a meet-
ing of the Women's Research Club.
TUESDAY, OCT. 6 ,
4:30 p.m.-Keith. Humble, guest
lecturer, will speak on "Webern:
A Re-evaluation" in the recital
hall of the music school.
7:30 p.m. - Joint Judiciary
Council will sponsor a judiciary
workshop in Rm. 3D of the Mich-
igan Union. Small group discus-
sions will center on specific ques-
tions on such topics as rule chang-
es, enforcement, rationale, rela-
tionship of Joint Judic to apart-
ment living and due process.
8 p.m.-Eric Hass, Socialist La-
bor Party candidate for president
will speak on current social is-
sues in the Union Ballroom. His
speech will be sponsored by the
Union Executive Council.
8 p.m.-Dr. J. M. Hinton of
Middlesex Hospital in London,
England, will speak on "The Dis-
tress of the Dying" in Children's
Psychiatric Hospital Aud.
8 p.m.-Antoine Zelenka, chief
of the social security division of
the International Labor Office,
will speak on "Priorities in So-
cial Security Planning in the De-
veloping Countries" in the West
Conference Rm. of the Rackham
Bldg.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7
8:30 a.m.-Registration for the
Conference on Leadership in the
Young Men's Christian Associa-
tion will begin in the lobby of
the Rackham Bldg.
Noon - Tom .Turner, associate
secretary of World University
Service International in Geneva,
Switzerland, will speak on "WUS

Projects in .Africa" at the GuildI

House, 802 Monroe St. WASHINGTON - The nation's1
3:30 p.m.-Felix Candela, archi- colleges and universities will be
tect, will speak on "Concrete Shell in the front lines of the adminis-
Structures" in Architecture Aud. tration's anti-poverty army this
7 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Civic year.
Ballet will hold auditions at the They will provide faculty troops
Sylvia Studio of Dance, 525 E. to serve as directors and staff
Liberty. members of anti-poverty programs
Tryouts will be held for an in remedial education and as proj-
apprentice company for ages 13 ect consultants in other areas.
and up, and a major company for Students and recent graduates
advanced and professional danc- can enlist as paid teachers and
ers. Those interested in choreog- counselors for the Job Corps, work
raphy, costume design, stage craft
music arrangement and other;
phases of the Ballet Theatre are Regents Accept
also invited to attend.
8 p.m.-The APA will perform
in "War and Peace" by Erwin Gif ts Grants
Piscator in Lydia Mendelssohn 1
Theatre. The Regents accepted $470,208
8 p.m.-The University Players in gifts at their September meet-
will perform "Gideon" by Paddy ing.
Chayefsky in Trueblood Aud. The Ford Foundation of New
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet York gave $49,058, while the
will give a recital in the Rack- W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle
ham Aud. The quartet consists of Creek donated $44,923.
Professors Gilbert Ross, violinist; A final payment of $34,698.30
Gustave Rosseels, violinist; Rob- was made from the Gertrude R.
ert Courte, violist, and Jerome Condon estate.
Jelinek, cellist-all of the music The Great Lakes Colleges Asso-
school. ciation, Holland, gave $10,296 to

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training programs, and adult lit-
eracy -programs. They can also
volunteer to help in local anti-
poverty projects or join the do-
mestic peace corps, VISTA, for a,
year.
Need 600
About 600 people are needed to
teach for one year periods and
serve. as counsellors in the Job
Corps' conservation camps. About
20 camps are scheduled to be open-
ed this fall. Within a year, there
will be about 150 camps for 20,-
000 high school drop-outs and
draft rejects.
Although trained teachers are
preferred, there is no set certifi-
cation or experience requirements
for Job Corps teachers. Salaries
will range upwards from $5000.
Universities will have major re-
sponsibilities in running the Job
Corps' 1000-1500 person education-
al and vocational- training cen-
ters. These centers will grow to
about 20,000, or the same number
of boys as the conservation camps.
Adaptation for Training
The Office of Economic Oppor-
tunity is currently contacting uni-
versities about staffing and de-
veloping curricula for these cen-
ters. The first two or three cen-
ters should be in operation by the
end of the year.

Social scientists in particular
are expected to contribute their
research skills to the-planning and
evaluating of community action
and other programs.
Faculty and administrators will
be serving as both consultants and
staff members on programs. A
number of them have already tak-
en leaves to work on the task forc-
es setting up the various programs.
Federal Aid
Large numbers of students re-
ceiving federal aid under the an-
ti-poverty bill's work-study pro-
gram are expected to be hired by
community organizations engaged
in fighting poverty. .
It is expected also that schools
and departments of education will
play a very large part in develop-
ing methods and materials for the
anti-poverty bill's other remedial
education programs.
It is "entirely possible," accord-
ing to Milton C. Cummings of the
Office of Education, that college
students may be hired as instruc-
tors in adult literacy programs.
Finall'y, up to 5000 volunteers
will be chosen in the next 12
months to serve in VISTA. The
program's backers hope the vol-
unteers' work will create a spirit
of "national involvement" and
spur others to help in their local
anti-poverty programs.

41

. THURSDAY, OCT. 8
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Will Herberg
of Drew University will speak on
"Existentialism: Religious and
Atheistic" in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m.-A panel discussion en-
titled "Students Challenge Will
Herberg" will be held in the South
Quad League.
8 p.m.-The APA will perform in
"The Hostage" by Brendan Behan
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "Gideon" by Paddy
Chayefsky in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Antonio and the Bal-
lets de Madrid will perform in
Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, OCT. 9
9 a.m.-The Medical Center will
hold a "Career Day" for any Uni-
versity students interested in a
medical or other health science
career. Registration will be in the
fourth floor lobby of the Medical'
.Science Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Will Herberg
of Drew University will speak on
"Biblical Faith and Man-made Re-
ligion in Contemporary America"
in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m.-The APA will perform
"The Hostage" by Brendan Behan
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "Gideon" by Paddy
Chayefsky in Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m. - Elbert R. Slaughter,
member of the Board of Lecture-
ship of the First Church of Christ,
will speak on "Where Are You
Going" in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The music school
will hold a composers forum in
the recital hall of the music school.
SATURDAY, OCT. 10
5 and 9 p.m.-The APA will per-
form in "The Hostage" by Bren-
dan Behan in Lydia Mendelssohn.
8:30 p.m.-Prof. John Kenneth
Galbraith of Harvard University,
forpner United States ambassador
to India, will speak on "The Care
and Prevention of Goldwater" in
the Law Club Lounge.
SUNDAY, OCT. 11
3 and 8 p.m.-The APA will per-
form in "War and Peace" by Er-
win Piscator in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Robert Noehren
of the music school, University
organist, will present a concert
in Hill Aud.

establish the association's fund'
for a Programmed Instruction
Workshop.
A gift of $10,000 came from the
Samuel H. Kress Foundation, New
York.
The Michigan Gas Association,
through the Michigan Alumni
Fund, contributed $12,000 for the
association's fellowship, and $10,-
000 was given by the Upjohn Com-
pany, Kalamazoo.
Other monies accepted included
$18,750 from Wayne State Uni-
versity, Detroit.
Establishment of the Alfred H.
WhiteMemorial fund for scholar-'
ships for students in the chemical'
engineering department was made
possible by a gift of $11,016.23,
from Joel M. Barnes, Newton Cen-
ter, Mass.
The Regents also accepted $10,-
000 from the American Conserva-
tion Association,. New York to
establish an association fund for
See REGENTS Page 8

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AFTER THE GAME!
Take your date
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Twilight Matinee SAT. at 5:00
(SNACK BAR in LEAGUE)

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.are
you
Men go where their thoughts take
them. The journey to Truth isa
revelation of Spirit - the king-
dom "within you." Hear this lee-
ture titled "Where Are You Go-
ing?" by ELBERT R. SLAUGHTER,
a member of the Board of Lecture-
ship of The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Mass.
ChflStia1NSiewceletire

S"Hilarious!" "Bawdy"

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-NEW YORKER

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IT'S HERE
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HALLELUJAH THE HILLS
f4:"The weirdest, wooziest,
wackiest comedy of
1963." TIME MAGAZINE
A 4!W MOAT
CINEM~A AIARS(

* 1
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Directed by Stephen Porter

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"Mad & Mirthprovoking!"... N.Y. Times
"Freewheeling, Bawdy, Poignant".... New Yorker

DIAL
5-6290

shows at
1:00-3:30
6:15-8:50

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Settings end Lighting designed by Kin Swados
Costumes designed by Judith Haugen

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