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October 01, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

arning a Two-Way
tees s--Tu tors Tol
' DONALD FLIPPO ial and Cultural Relations Project,
remarked recently.
ler to reach the student Sleet was addressing a grour
irking with on a personal of new tutors at a meeting held
a have to understand his to discuss approaches to tutorinii
, attitudes, backgrounds disadvantaged Negro children in
)nality," Charles R. Sleet Ann Arbor.
of the Ann Arbor Tutor- "Believe it or not, all of us are
actually teaching only for our-
selves. When we deal with other
people, we expect them to adjust
to our standards," he said.
Bridge Gap
Sleet explained that the proj-
ect's purpose is to bridge the gar
between the Negro and white cul-
tures through supplementary edu-
cation on a one-to-one basis.
The tutors are receiving coop-
eration from the students' parents,
schools and teachers, he said, but
they should be informed about
how to approach the subject of
tutoring.
"As tutors you must approach
your pupils with an open mind,
not forcing any one culture on
them," he commented. "There arc
certain things basic to both cul-
tures-reading, writing, effective
communication-in which the Ne-
gro children are deficient. We are
HARLES R. SLEET going to eliminate this cultural
gap."

LocalWUS
Chapter
Orgyanized,
C7d ,
By MICHAEL HEFFER
The University chapter of World
University Service (WUS) met for
the first time as a recognized
student organization M o n d a y
night.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be sent
in TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3564 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, andsby 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1
Day Calendar
University Hospital Conference-"The
University Hospital Concept of Patient-
Unit Management": Registration, Rack-
ham Lobby, 8 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar - Bernard

Bass, Prof. of Bus. Ad., University of
Pittsburgh, "What Managers Should
Know About Behavioral Science": Mich-
igan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Cinema Guild-"Blood of a Poet" and
"Come Back Africa": Architecture Aud.,
7 and 9 p.m.

-Daily-Jerry Stoetzer
The 'U' Life: Payvments, LongLines
Yesterday was a day of reckoning for many University student who had been living it up, flashing
fall registration stubs and spending their money. Tuition payments were due, and students formed
lines in the Administration Bldg. reminiscent of registration a month ago. Some postponed the dead-
line by paying a $5 fee which extended the payment for another month.

ACROSS CAMPUS:

/.

Science Grant of $30,500 Announced

The National Science Founda-
tion has announced the award of
two grants, totaling $30,500, to
support research in mineralogy
and mathematics at the Univer-
sity.
Prof. E. William Heinrich of the
geology department, curator of
the mineralogical collections, is di-
recting a two-year study of rock
formation supported by a $21,200
NSF grant. The research is titled
"Petrogenetic Studies of Carbon-
atites." Prof. Lamberto Cesari of
the mathematics department is
in charge of research titled "Op-

Cultural Relations Project will
hold a meeting on the Third Floor '
of the Michigan Union. Miss Ellis
Hack, coordinator of mathematics
for Ann Arbor Public Schools will
speak on "Approaches to the New
Mathematics." Prof. William Mor-
ris of the education school will
speak on "Educational Problems
of the Culturally Separated Child."
* * *
7:30 pan.-Prof. Joachin Birke
of the German department will
speak in Rm. 3B of the Union on
"Germany: It's Cultural Charac-
ter."
* * *
8 p.m{-The APA will perform
"The Hostage" by Brendan Be-;
han in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
8 p.m.-Allison Green and Mey-
er Warshawsky, state Republican
administrative board candidates,
j and four Washtenaw County can-
didates for the state Legislature
will appear at a GOP rally in the
west cafeteria of Ann Arbor Hikh
School.
FRIDAY, OCT. 2
2 nm-Progress and plans of

in Aud. B. Coffee will be served
before the lecture at 3:45 ,p.m.
in 3417 Mason Hall.
* * *
7 p.m.-The International Stu-
dents Association will hold a par-'
ty at the International Center.
German entertainment and re-
freshments will be featured.
* * *

WUS aids colleges and universi-
ties around the world by providing
money for self-help projects. Com-
posed of students, teachers and
administrators of schools, it oper-
ates through national branches in
50 countries.
WUS existed at the University
as a Student Government Council
project for about one year be-
fore it was recognized as a student
organization. A bucket drive and
an auction were held to raise
funds, Evangelos Coufoudakis,
president of the local chapter and
a graduate student from Greece,
said.
Also, some sororities aided the
group with "sacrifice" dinners,
where soup was served instead of
the regular meal with the money
saved going to WUS. WUS plans
to do the same thing this year,
Coufoudakis said.
He stressed that another major
project for the year will be to in-
form students about WUS and to
increase membership locally.
International WUS began in
1919, making' grants available tc
universities and students. When
a university (needs money for a
project, new housing for instance,
local and national funds are mo-
bilized.
If these funds are insufficient
International WUS will provide,
money, he said. The school usually
supplies the manpower for the
project and the cost is often shar-
ed by WUS, the local government,
and the school being aided.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Use of This Column for Announce- 1
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organi-
zations only. Forms are available in=
Room 1011 SAB.
s* * *
American Societl of Public Adminis-
tration, a'Rapport in Warsaw." Report
on round table :by Dr. Ferrel Heady,
chairman, U.S. delegation, ."Oct. 2, 4
p.m., Graduate Outing Room, Rackham.
* * *
Le Cerele Francais, Le Baratin, le
1 Oct., le jeudi, 3-5 p.m.,, 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
U. of M. Physical Therapy Club, meet-
ing. Speaker: Dr. Ray, chairman of
physical medicine department, Oct. 1
7 pm., University Hospital Conference
Room, Third Level.
Voice, Meeting of Voice's Student
Committee for Engineering Employ-
mrent in Peacetime Economy (SCEEPE),
Thurs., Oct. 1, 8 p.n., Room 3C, Michi-
gan Union.
WAA Folk Dance Club, Folk dance
with instruction suitable for begin-
ners, Oct. 2, 8-10:30 p.m., Women's Ath-
letic Bldg.
* * *
U. of M. Swim Club; Women's all
campus swimming .meet (sororities and
dorms), 8 p.m., 'Thurs., Oct. 1, at
Women's' Pool.

I
,}
" C
E
. 1
' Y
1
1
J

seminar in Mathematical Statistics:
K. S. Srikantan will speak on "A Prob-
lem in Optimum Allocation" on Thurs.,
Oct. 1, at 4 p.m., in Room 3201 Angell
Hall.
General Notices
Lecture: Dr. Harold Raush of the U.
of M. will speak on the topic, "Inter-
action Sequences: Analysis of Sequen-
tial Aspects in the Social Behavior of
Children," Fri., Oct. 2, in Aud. B,
Angell Hall, at 4:15 p.m. Coffee will
be served at 3:45 at 3417 Mason Hall.
Putnam Practice Period: 4 p.m., Fri.,
'Oct. 2,'1035 Angell Hall.
French and German Screening Exams:
The screening exams in French and Ger-
man foreDoctoral candidates will be ad-
ministered on Mon., Oct. 5 from 7-9
p.m. in Aud. B, Angell Hal. Doctoral
candidates must pass the screening
examination before taking the written
test in French or German, unless they
have received B or better in French 111
or German 111. Those who fail the
examination may take it again when
the test is administered in December.
(Continued on Page 3)
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PROF. WILLIAM HEINRICH.
timal Control," being conducted
over a period of approximately six.
months with a $9300 NSF grant.
Three University psychologists
will take part in a conference on
learning, remembering and forget-
ting at Princeton, N.J., Sept. 27-
30. Profs. Edward L. Walker,
James V. McConnell and Arthur
W. Melton will attend the meeting
sponsored by the New York Acad-
emy of Science.
THURSDAY, OCT. 1
12:30-5 p.m.-Season tickets for
the University Players' Playbill se-
ries will be on sale at the box of-
fice of Trueblood Aud. in the
Frieze Bldg.. Tickets will also be
available Friday.
Ticket sales for individual per-
formances, including "Gideon,"
which will be performed next
Wednesday through Saturday, will
begin on Monday.
* « *

the Development Council and
Alumni Fund will be discussed in I
a joint board meeting in the Re-
gents' Rm. of the Administration'
Bldg. Guests are welcome.
The meeting is part of the De-G
velopment Conference of the Uni-S
versity being held this weekend.
. * s*
3 p.m.-Sir Nutcomb Hume, a
British industrialist, will address
faculty members and graduate
students ofthe business adminis-
tration school in Rm. 130 of the1
Business Administration Bldg. His
topic will be "The Problems and
Prospects of United Kingdom In-l
dustry."
* . ,
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Harold Raush
of the psychology department will
speak on "Interaction Sezuences:<
Analysis of Sequential Aspects in7
the Social Behavior of Children"

ALLISON GREENE
7:45 p.m.-Arthur L. Johnson
deputy director of the Michigan
Civil Rights Commission, will
speak on "America's Civil Rights
Struggle and the World Commu-
nity" at the Presbyterian Church,
1432 Washtenaw.
The lecture will- be preceded
by a dinner for all foreign stu-
dents. Reservations can be made
at the Ecumenical Campus Cen-
ter, 536 Thompson St.
* * *
8 p.m.-The APA will perform
Brendan Behan's "The Hostage'
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The London Symph-
ony Orchestra with Georg Solti
conducting will give a concert in
Hill Aud., as part of the Univer-
sity Musical Society Extra Series.

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