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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 27, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LETTERS By Steven Haller
lartinon Reviews Career"

French compatriots, Jean
is highly regarded as a
But in this country he
apt to be spoken of as
,n who succeeded Frit
s head of the Chicago
y Orchestra," for hi
re been overlooked here.
owever, it appears tha-
all be changed,' as Mar-
closed yesterday that thf
the Chicago Symphony
nissioned him to write F
>hony. He describes it as
, type andprobably not
." He adds that "sym-
f not entirely appropri-
:obably the "best word"
e the new work.
nphony was commission-
brate the orchestra's 75th
ry. It will be the fourth
y for Martinon, whose
iphony, "Hymn a la Vie'
To Life"), premiered ir
three years ago. Before
second symphony was
acclaimed when the Bos-
phony performed it in
First Symphony
on began his conducting
ack in the 1940's with

his first symphony. The conduc-
tor who was scheduled to handle
the concert bowed out three weeks if
before the performance because ;-'{
of other commitments. Martinon
took over and was in the lime-
light long enough for the musica
public, to realize that he hadft
knack for conducting as well a1
composing.
When Fritz Reiner found that"
ill health made it difficult te " .
continue working full-time with
the orchestra, several guest con-
ductors, including Martinon, came:
to share the podium.
With Reiner's death in 1963, the
post of music director was giver
to Martinon, making him (withs
Paul Paray's retirement in Detroit
and Charles Munch's in Boston) CONDUCTOR MARTINON
the only French-born conductor
now directing the symphony or- joys playing chamber music witt
chestra of a major American city. members of the orchestra.He be-
Ann Arbor Performance ((gan his musical career as a violin-
His recent Ann Arbor concer' st.
proved that the Chicago Symph- "I cannot feel comfortable if
ony is still very much to be reck the musicians are not my friends,'
oned with in terms of precision Martinon explains.
and musical feeling. In contrast But he emphasizes that "friend-
to Reiner, who reputedly ruled ship is not a sign of weakness; it
the orchestra with an iron hanC does not mean that the conduc-
and was not noted for fraterniz- tor is not ready to impose his
ing with his men, Martinon en- own will if necessary. The men
give me their best efforts, and I
Snnvcig te that" Those who heart'

Cabifornia
Greeks Stay
Suspended
By DON HARRISON
UCLA Daily Bruin
Collegiate Press Service
LOS ANGELES - Fourteen of
the fifteen fraternities and sorori-
ties suspended at the University
of California for refusing to sign
a non-discrimination pledge are
still under suspension this week.
One of the fraternities, Lamb-'
da Chi Alpha, signed the pledge
and was returned to good stand-
ing this week. Twelve sororities
and two fraternities at three of
the university's campuses remain
forbidden to use the University of
California's name or facilities.: In,
addition, they have been barred
from many student-sponsored ac-
tivities on their campuses.
T he pledge, which chapter presi-
dents must sign annually, reads
as follows:
I hereby certify that member
(of my fraternity) are free to
choose and accept new member:
without discrimination as to race,
religion or national origin.

The Wee
SUNDAY, SEPT. 27
9:45 a.m.-Two University stu-
dents, Diane Runkle, '65, and
Peter Werner, Grad, newly return-
ed from volunteer service with the
COFO Mississippi "Summer Proj-
ect," will report on "What You
Haven't Heard about Mississippi"
in the Meeting Hall of the Friends
Center, 1416 Hill St.
3 p.m.--There will be a mass
meeting for organizing a student
employes union in the Multipur-
pose Rm. of the UGLI.
* * *
3 p.m. and 8 p.m.-The Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists will
present Piscator's "War and
Peace" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
MONDAY, SEPT. 28
4 p.m.--James D. Murray oa
the engineering school will talk
on "Multiple Time Method Applied
to Viscous Wave Dampings" in 311
of the West Engineering Bldg.
7:45 p.m.--Neil Staebler, con-
gressman-at-large and Democratic
candidate for governor, will speak
at a "Listening Party" of Young
Democrats in Rm. 3KLMN of
the Union.

"Mosques and Fortresses of
lam" in 203 Tappan Hall.
* * *

Is-

c
t

6 p.m.-Prof. Zelma Weisfeld ofs
the speech department will speak
on "Current Trends in Costum-,r
ing Shakespeare's Plays" in theI
Vandenberg Rm. of the League.
* * *
8:30 p.m.-The Ballet de Parise
featuring Zizi Jeanmaire, will per-
form in Hill Aud.t
WEDNESDAY, SEPT.30
7:30 p.m.-Brice Carnahan; in-
structor of chemical engineer-
ing and biostatistics, will speak on
"An Introduction to Digital Com-
puters and the MAD Language"
in the Natural Science Aud.'
* * *
8 p.m.--The APA will perform1
Brendan Behan's "The Hostage"
in Lydia MendelssohnTheatre.,
THURSDAY, OCT. 1
10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.--Vice-Presi-
dent for University, Relations
Michael Radock will preside over'
a Mental Health Press Day Con-
ference.
* * *
4 p.m.-Prof. Gerald D. Rosen-
thal of Harvard University will
speak on \"The Implications of
Economic Analysis for Hospita&
Planning" in Rm. 64 of the Busi-
ness Administration Bldg.j
*. * *
8 p.m.-The APA will perform'
"The Hostage" by Brendan Be-
han in Lydia. Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
FRIDAY, OCT.;2
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Harold Raush
of the psychology department wil?
speak on "Interaction Sequences:l
Analysis of Sequential Aspects in s
the Social Behavior of Children"
in Aud. B. Coffee will be served
before the lecture at 3:45 p.m.
in 3417 Mason Hall.

7:45 p.m.-Arthur L. Johnson open house at the new School of
deputy director of the Michigan Music on North Campus.
Civil Rights Commission, will * * *
speak on "America's Civil Rights 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m.-Prof.
Struggle and the World Commu- Marilyn Mason of the music school
nity" at the Presbyterian Church will present a program of organ
1432 Washtenaw. music in Studio 2110 of the music
The lecture will be preceded school.
by a dinner for all foreign stu- * * *
dents. Reservations can be made 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.-The APA
at the Ecumenical Campus Cen- will present "The Hostage" by

To Come: a Campus Calei

ter, 535 Thompson St.,
8 p.m.-The APA will perform
Brendan Behan's "The Hostage'
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

'Brendan Behan in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
e , *
8:30 p.m. -- Joseph Schuster,
guest cellist and Barbara Holm-
quest, pianist, will give a concert
in the recital hall of the new
music school.
SUNDAY, OCT. 4
5 p.m. and 8 p.m. - The APA
Repertory Company will present
Brendan Behan's "The Hostage in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
. * *
8:30 p.m. - Professors Eugene
Bossart and Charles Fisher of the
music department will give a duo
piano recital with a Chamber Or-
chestra under the direction of
Prof. Gilbert Ross of the music
school in Rackham Aud.

H(r

I

Y-
k

-Daily-Robert Sheffield
AN OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL William N Hubbard (left),
ociate Dean C. John Tupper (center) and Alton Blakeslee
;ht)' Associated Press science writer, hold a panel discussion
medicine and medical education in Michigan. Ray Bruner of
Toledo Blade (far right) also participated in the University
ss Club panel.
robe State Medical Issues

the hair-raising precision with
which the Chicago musicians exe-
cuted Bartok's "Miraculous Man-
darin Suite" here can testify that
unity of ensemble has not died
with Reiner.
As composer as well as conduc-
tor, Martinon has some definite
opinions of his own. Considering
the conductor's duty to the print-
ed score, he points out that one
should always respect what the
composer had in mind. But h,
adds that what the composer hae'
in mind is not always indicated in
the score.
Last Word
"What Robert Schumann wrote
in his scores, for example, should
not be thought of as the last word,
as far as what he was really try-
ing to say. This is something that
each conductor must consider for
himself, and it may be different
from one piece to another," he
observes.
Martinon appears dubious about
the value of electronic music, F
recent form of composition for
tape recorders and IBM machines.
"Such results from research are
certainly interesting, but we must
watch what can be done with this
sort of system. I wonder if there
is really any future in it," he
queries.
It is evident that Martinon has
grown accustomed to his new sur-
roundings, although there seemF
to be a touch of regret in his
voice that there is such a lack
of good-sized mountains in the
Chicago area. For one who has
climbed Mount Blanc and the Mat.
terhorn, the hills of Chicago are
not much of a challenge. This
small , problem notwithstanding
however, it is apparent that the
future of the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra is in creative hands.

Dean of Students Byron H. At- * * *
kinson of thje UCLA campus ha 8:30 p.m.--Professors Jerome Je-
expressed the belief that many linek and Rhea Kish of the music
houses will sign the pledge ever school will give a recital in Rack-
though the deadline has passed ham Aud. Jelinek plays the cello
Any house that does sign will re- and Mrs. Kish, the piano.
gain its lost privileges, he said.
Aside from the 15 houses whicr' 8:30 p.m.-Donald Wayne Wil
were disciplined, only five of the ,hams, organist, will give a reci-
state's 151 affiliate chapters fail- tal in Hill Aud.
ed to sign the pledge. The five TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
were given extensions of the dead- 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30 p.m. --
line and are expected to sign Health Service will offer flu shots
soon. to students and staff. The fee
Included among the Berkele is $1 for students and $1.50 for
signers was Pi Beta Phi sorority faculty and staff.

CONDUCTOR SOLTI

DIAL 2-6264
Shows at 2:00 - 5:00 & 8:15
Weekday Matinees 75c
Evenings & Sunday $1.00
NEVER BEFORE A
SPECTACLE LIKE IT!

8:30 ptm.-The London Symph-
ony Orchestra with Georg Solti
conducting will give a concert in
Hill Aud. as part of 'the Univer-
sity Musical Society Extra Series.
* *
SATURDAY, OCT. 3
5-6:30 p.m.-There will be an

1 4

4

which, along with its sister chap-I
ter on the UCLA campus, attempt-
ed to have the California courts
preliminarily enjoin the univer-
sity regents from enforcing the
deadline.
The fact that the overwhelminf
number of non-signing organiza-I
tions came from the UCLA cam-
pus led Atkinson to observe:
"This makes it perfectly clear thait
it is local influence in the Los
Angeles sorority system, rather
than national affiliations, that'
have caused this invidious com-
parison."

* * *
Noon-Gov. George Romney will
deliver a speech on the steps of
Hill Aud.
** *
1-10 p.m.-The American Asso-
ciation of University Women will
hold their Twelth Annual Used
Book Sale in the shop room of
the Student Activities Bldg.
* * *
4:10 p.m.--The Center for Near
Eastern and North African Stud-
ies will sponsor an illustrated lec-
ture by Prof. George F. Houran
of the history department on

- .

- JMTCHIGR.

DIAL
5-6290

Of suspense, pursuit end courage..

ZINNEMEAN
GREGORY
PECK
ANTHONY
QUINN
OMAR
SHARIF

I' l

4

l

I

TODAY
From 1 P.M.

40M

Dial
668-6416

(Continued from Page 1)
The physician percentage of the
pulation has stayed constant
r 20 years, Tupper pointed out.
3ut the efficiency in terms of
dlls per patient has doubled in
e same period."
Hubbard said that rising hos-
tal costs are one of the prin-
Pal problems confronting both
edicine as a whole and medical
ucation. He explained that clini-
J study is an 'ntegral part of
doctor's education. But, the hos-
tals which the Medical School
es to provide clinical 'work-the
niversity, 'St. Joseph and"'Wayne
runty Hospitals-total 2000 beds..
'his total is the principal limi-
tion on the number of students
our programs."
By contrast, Detroit is "very
ch" in clinical facilities usable
connection with a medical cen-
r, Hubbard said. Wayne State
niversity is seeking support foi
new medical center there. It
ms to enlarge the graduating
edical class from 125 to 200.
A recent study on medical needs
iticipated that this would pre-
re Michigan for the next few
:ars.
Wayne State, like the Univer-
ty, is pressed for legislative sup-
rt, panelists agreed. The Uni-,
rsity was originally promised F
:w medical building in 1951. The
edical Science Bldg. Unit II re-'
ived its first substantial appro-
iation last year.
Even with support, the train-
g of increased numbers of phy-
cians may not be enough. "An
iormous array of facilities anc'
lated personnel is needed. The

dimensions of the implications of
these related needs are so great
that the component of physi-
cians needed is the smallest com-
ponent of total requirements,"
Hubbard said.
Labor comprises 75 per cent of
the costs of a hospital, he went
on..
Costs notwithstanding, "we are'
faced even now with an abso-
lutely unprecedented total demand
for medical services, though many
aren't yet convinced that this de-
mand reflects a real need for serv-
ices," Hubbard said.

MARK IT MUST SEE! ONE OF THE BEST!
MOVIES OF THIS AND MANY A YEAR!
MASTROIANNI IS MASTERLYI IT 1S A BEAUTIFUL FILM! YOU OWE IT TO'
YOURSELF TO SEE ITI" -Judith Cri.4.e,.,*17,bune
"WAIT UNTIL YOU SEE IT! ENTERTAINING
. ,. HUMAN, VIVID, COMPASSIONATE
AND HUMOROUS. MASTROIANNI EXCELS I"
NEXT: "HALLEUJAH THE HILLS"

t 1 1BEHOLUD
APALE
S5HORSE
Shows at 1 :O-3:40-6:15-8:50.--Feature at 1:30-4:00-6:40-915

STEPH1EN BOY- AL.EC GUINNESS
JAMES MASON 'CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
EMPI-
TECNNMcULOR

Canmpus
fDate-Nite"
Fashions
informally modeled
tomorrow evening
Mon., Sept. 28th

See the new "look al
hours fashions-their
becoming, their desig
for you and your car

1 i
ive" after
ways are
ins new-
mpus social life.
Meet our "KNOW-HOW" girls...
Alice Leach
U. of M. '66
Fran Konapek
U. of M. '68
Diane Dennison
U. of M. '66
Cindy Kammann
U. of M. '66

;"LM ,.MM-M-- o" ='''WWO M y '' MF.''''--''AN.-47 =MW===-.'''.-Mir--'- ____________AM______ . -. -'--
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E' Rersousl
IE
W ith a CINEM A GUILD Break
E r
E 'I
I You say the books have got you down? The research paper
due tomorrow at 8 is a bbunk sheet in 'your typewriter? a
E r
a
WELL, DUN'Tii
E Come to the CINEMA GUILD nsteadl Relax. Enjoy the best theI
E E
cinem has to of fer. Let the power and beauty possible on the
i ~motion picture, screen revive your tired senses.;
The films shown at the CINEMA GUILD are guaranteed to
a wake you up. Safer than -pep pills and better "for you too.'
Refreshed, you can go home and finish that paper, or still hit1
.,IAI
theysac. I an cae, i wa moe fn tan mth r Aisttle

'4

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G\,k Qgti
P y o P p p5
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