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September 04, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICRIGAN DAILY

WRInAv -&:. 14AAA -

____________________________________________________________________ ivaynh, 6riW.LU.Di,1964i~

t

neration Plans Poet Series

JOCELYN DANIELS
tion, the University inter-
azine, marks its sixteenth
i a college literary maga-
st" by publishing a new
es.
our hard-cover volumes
ain the works of Kon-
Lardas, Anne Steven-
ve Bronson and Nancy
- young, contemporary
o have been widely pub-
literary magazines but
yet had their poetry
the first time a college
has undertaken such a
he Generation staff is
layout, photography and,
verything but the print-
>inding.
Sagging Midriff
aew Poet Series permits
or to be, a young poet
is still a young person.,
1 fate of the young poet
ca is to have a sagging'
short wind and white
a middle age," George A.
6, editor, explained.
1964 the Board in Con-
udent Publications loan-
agazine $5000 to under-
series.
ing to White, the Ann
'ess is initially printing
Les of each of the four
-enough to cover sub-
nd place a limited num-
okstores. Doubleday and
and Follett Company
ibute the complete series.
Poet Publicity
.ing companies frequent-
a slim volume of poems
blishing the stories or
young developing poets.
1u~II

Consequently, such volumes re-
ceive little attention and the writ-
er, as -a poet, remains obscure.
Generation hopes to alleviate
this condition by having the New
Poet Series widely, distributed and

Lardas reflected. "He has a great
feeling for the Greek spirit which
he can express in generalities be-
cause he is completely Greek. Al-
though. my 'heritage is Greek, my
culture is American, so I can best
express the spirit of my poems by
particular Greek images.
In the volume's title poem, what
he terms one of his few "Ameri-
can" poems, Lardas applies Greek
images to the theme of his grand-
father working on a roofing job
in the family business in Pitts-
burgh. '"When I have a strong
desire to put .any feeling into
writing, it .is most natural that
the poem have some sort of Greek
basis such as 'therpreoccupation
with fire and water," Lardas ex-
plained.
Word.,Sounds
Lardas believes that while his
earlier., poems P concentrate on
imagery, his later works empha-
size word sounds. "I realize now
that there is not just one way to
write a poem.
"When I re-read my early
poems, I view their themes in.a
new light and I want to express
them. differently. :But they were
written in the spirit of the mo-
ment. To change them would be
a betrayal."

SGC Defines
Function of
Student Government Council
passed a motion Wednesday night.
defining the power of the calen-.
daring committee upon the re-
quest of that committee.
Other action included passage of
-a motion from the Committee on
United States National Student,
Association, a presentation con-
cerning student life insurance and
a report.on the student employees
association.'
The Calendaring Committee re-
quested that SGC define the limits
of their power. In response, Coun-
cil passed a motion, proposed by
Sherry, Miller, '65, which reserved
for SGC the right to approve stu-
dent sponsored activities and gave
to the Calendaring Committee the
right to schedule the events.
Barry Bluestone, '66, reported
that there should be some form of
student employee association.
Some of the factors to be con-
sidered are the recent increases
in dormitory rates and the higher.
minimum wages at several'" other
state universities, he added.

(Continued from Page!)
However, Rea stressed that once
Congress frees the funds a flock
of new loans will be possible. He
and Streit are still continuing to
interview students seeking NDEA
loan assistance for the current
school year.,
An NDEA loan provides up to
$1000 each year of undergraduate
or graduate studies with a $5000
limit. Loans here average $600.
The borrower can repay any por-
tion of the loan without interest
until one year after he graduates.
'He then has 10 more years to pay
the remainder at three per cent
annually.
There are no restrictions on use
of the money, although the finan-
cial aids office administrates it
closely.
More than 1000 students here
received over $500,000, in NDEA
funds last year. Congress provided
$447,000. The remainder came
from matching and repayment
monies.
Streit Request
Last December, Streit submitted
a request to Washington for
$800,000 to cover the current
school year. After - processing the
application, the Office of Educa-
tion "assured us in the spring that
if Congress passed its appropria-
tion as anticipated, the University

Uses Emergency Loan Funds

'I

In the first few years, no single
institution was allowed more than
$250,000 annually. The University,
due to its enrollment, netted the
maxium amount.
Raise Ceilings
In late 1963, Congress raised the
institution ceiling to $800,000 and
passed a supplementary approp-
riation for the 1963-64 school year.
Rea and Streit, who'"had filled
the $250,000 quota, submitted more
applications and were awarded
additional funds.
While the 1964-65 appropriation
lags, Congress is nonetheless pass-
ing an expanded program. It has
cleared both Houses with slight
variations. An identical bill must
be molded in conference commit-
tees which are not yet named.
The NDEA extension program,
effective this year, would elimin-
ate the $800,000 institutional bar-
rier. It would also enlarge the
total program from its pending
$136 million level to $163 million.
So, although Rea said, "we are
trying to get students to accept
only minimal amounts right now,"
the University may wind up re-
ceiving more Congressional money
this year than the stalled bill con-
tains.
Rea has had a distinguished
record at the University as both
a student and administrator. He
was an All-American basketball
player here in 1922,, the year of
his graduation. He became Dean
of Men in 1952. The appointment
to director of financial aids came
in 1961 when the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs was restructured
along functional lines and the
dean system abolished.

BE A BUROCATI
Learn About
Campus Activities
Work on Campus
Projects
Upper Classman'"'MS METN

'I

KONSTANTINOS LARDAS

Run-Move Over of
eat Crowd Pleaser!

/ .}:

reviewed by outstanding critics. -
Lardas, whose work "And In.
Him Too; In Us*' will begin the
series in October, is 'completing
his doctoral studies in compara-
tive literature and teaching , Eng-
lish at the University.
"His metaphysics is that of the
pre-Socratic philosophers, with
that special Greek continuity
which combines the most archaic
Hellenic thought about water, fire
and family with the most tradi-
tional and yet speculative form of
Christian thought-that of Hel-
Warren of the English department
lenic Orthodoxy," Prof. Austin
writes in his introduction to Lar-
das' poems.
- Still Vividt
Lardas was born in Pittsburgh'
and lived only two years in Greece.
In 1931, at the age of four, he
visited Greece and can still recall"
vivid scenes of that period.
In 1962 he returned to study at
the University of Athens. "The
professors there were like unap-
proachable gods," Lardas remi-
nisced.
"I missed the exchange of ideas
between teacher and student that
one finds in American univer-
sities." Behind him were four
years at the University of Pitts-
burgh, one at Columbia University.
where he received his M.A., and
two years at the University.
Striving for -personal contact
with Greek poets, Lardas quit his
studies in Athens and sought out
Seferies, winner of a Nobel Prize,
Ritsos, a leftist poet and Nikos
Gatsos. His friendship with this
surrealist poet greatly influenced
Lardas' poems.
Greek Heritage
"Everything he wrote seemed
beautiful because it was in Greek,",
Across

'U' Bands Schedule Year's Activities

AID DIRECTOR REA
share would be $700,000," Streit
said.
During the'spring and summer,
while the bill lay dormant in Con-
gress, the Office of Financial Aids
began accepting accplications for
assistance.
Rea and Streit promised ap-
proximately $500,000 worth of
loans. They anticipated the bill's
approval long before fall. It hasn't
yet passed and the Office of Edu-
cation tie-over is insufficient.
- Loan Reserves
So they turned to an emergency
loan reserve, established by a
large bequest, to make.up the
temporary difference. They are
asking students who do not need
money immediately to await the
Congressional action.
Administrators have been mak-
ing continuous adjustments to
changes in the NDEA loan pro-
gram since its inception in 1958.
It was established in 1958 as part'
of an act "to strengthen the na-
tional defense." The original ap-
propriation, for 1958-59 was only
$47.5 million with $75 million
allocated in 1959-60. The current
stalled appropriation calls for $136
million.

Read
aily
Classifieds

4

Michigan Room
Women's League

'j

Non Tam. Pares, Quam Superi-
ores--"Not As Good As, But Better
Than," .is the motto of The. Uni-
versity of Michigan Bands.
This year , approximately 400
students will attempt to prove the
validity of this motto. They will
be involved in either one or more
of..the four bands sponsored by
the University: The - Michigan
Marching Band, The University
Symphony Band, The Varsity
Band and the Wolverine Band.
The Michigan Marching Band,
under the direction of Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli of the . music
school, traditionally is an all male
organization made up of approxi-
mately 185 members. Any quali-
fied male student on campus, re-
gardless of school or college, may
obtain membership.
On to State
The band appears at all home
football games and campus pep
rallies. This year the band will
also accompany the football team
to both the Ohio State and Michi-
gan State games.,
The band has received acclaim
fron several sources including
feature films, television and na-
tional magazine articles. Last, year
Revelli also received an invitation
to participate in the Tattoo (mili-
tary band competition) at the
Edinburgh Music Festival in Scot-
land.
This was the first such invita-
tion to be issued to an American
college group, and although the
band was unable to attend, it
hopes to take advantage of such
invitations in the near future.
The University's Symphony
Band is the principal concert band
on campus. This organization
each year presents several con-
certs in Ann Arboroften in con-
junction with national music con-
ferences. These concerts feature
guest artists and conductors, as
well as the finest in band litera-
ture.
An annual spring tour to various
parts of the United States is a

gan Day ceremonies at the New
York World's Fair. And in 1961,
the United States Department of
State chose the band to represent
the nation on an extended cul-
tural exchange tour of the Soviet
Union and the Near East.
The Varsity and Wolverine
bands are open to all qualified
students in all colleges and schools
of the University. These activity
bands play concerts, perform at
many campus athletic events and
annually combine with the Sym-
phony Band for an outdoor con-.
cert.

ai

I
I

* OUR RAGTIME
ARTIST IS BACK
BAR
PRESENTS
FRANK KUNTZ
and his RAGTIME PIANO
Every Tues.-Thurs. & Sat.

Sept. 1

I

. . 4 p.m.

;r

'A

BEER

WINE

COCKTAILS

I

122 W. Washington

"----

.:

CHRIST AND BAHA'V'LAH
Propht Founders of Two Major World Faiths-
Discussion-Ref reshments

I

I

SANDERS

Friday, Septemb

Jr 4... 8:00P.M.
William

I
I

310 E.

Campus -
TODAY
7 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will hold auditions
for this fall's production of "The
Sorcerer" and "Trial By Jury" in
Rooms X and Y on the third floor
of the Union.

Call 662-9146 for transportation
Sponsored by the Baha'i Student Group

til';,

I

Dial,
665-6290

iEI U G

HELD
OVER

im

WA

1'

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
Department of Speech

"Tonight

the

4
I
1
f
t

The most rib-tickling Team since Adam and Eve!
1ACELWO
/ UITIORIO DE SICAS
...'CARLO PONTI in COLOR --uasaa5

A

I

Fa i--Spring

Cinema Guild
Presents .. ,

PLAYBILL 1964/65

I

Paddy Chayefsky:
GIDEON

Moliere:
THE IMAGINARY
INVALID
Wednesday-Saturday, November 4-7
Trueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.

They make love three times in thre
DIAL 662-6264
Weekday 75c6

e ways in one movie

4
4
4
I
I
I
I

'ednesday-Saturday, October 7-10
ueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.
EMIERE Production in co-operation
with the Department of English
rHE PEACEMAKER
by Carl Oglesby
ednesday-Saturday, December 2-5
'ueblood Auditorium, Frieze Bldg.
Francois Billetdoux:
C H EZ TORPE
Anesday-Saturday, February 17-20
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ra

Eves., Sun. &
Holidays $1.00

(SkJII~

Shows at
1-3-5
7&9

Anton Chekhov:
UNCLE VANYA

Wednesday-Saturday, January 27-30
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
The Opera Department, School of Music
in
jOHANN STRAUSS'
DIE FLEDERMAUS

F

Our program information secretary
is a Perfect 66-288-7 1... and
is always available, night or day
WHY NOT CALL HER NOW?
What's playing at the CINEMAG GUILD this week
Simply call 662-8871 and the CINEMA GUILD'S
friendly and informative Program Secretary will
help you find the best in motion picture entertainment.

a
,a
sa
a

Strri ng therfi rst fiel -lengt
hilarious,action-packedtfilm!
__ hEgTLO9

I

i

Wednesday-Sunday, March 17-21
Lydia Mendelssohn.Theatre

f I

Bertolt Brecht.
GALl LEO
Wednesday-Saturday, April 7-10

A

,,

1

I

®sf

17

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