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September 02, 1964 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE SPECTATOR
by Tom Rowland
The Long, Hot Summer

Farley Qualifies First for Olympic

Trial Fin

Meet W. G. Gridley. He's a happy man.
Mr. Gridley, who lives in East Lansing, Michigan, and who is
the manager of the local Kresge dime store there, has just spent
the summer selling 1800 Frisbees to local college enthusiasts.
Insignificant? Trivial? Never. *For, in the great hinterland to
the north, Michigan State University has Frisbee fever. In the
greatest athletic revolution since Knute Rockne and the forward
pass, these saucer-shaped missiles made by the Wham-O Mfg. Col
have surplanted touch football, necking, studying, and grassers as
the Spartan pasttime-and threaten to undermine the entire athletic
scholarship program.'
But why? The State News, MSU }
campus paper's roving news staff,
tried to find out. Pat Wilson, an
MSU sophomore from Detroit,
claims that the ultimate object
is to "perfect your technique in
handling a Frisbee."
Others weren't taken in quite'
so easily. Robert Rice, a junior
from Corunna, is a Frisbee, hold-
out. "I don't own one, but if I
did," says Bob, "I'd probably use
it for an ash tray. They fail to
impress me." The question now is,
will Bob lose his scholarship?"........................)..

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Junior Bill Far-;
ley qualified yesterday with the.
fastest time for today's finals in
the 1500-meter freestyle at the1
U.S. Olympic trials.,
Wolverine Captain Ed Bartsch
failed to qualify for the finals of
the 200-meter backstroke as did
world recordholder Tom Stock.:
However, sophomore Russ Kingery
Manager Wanted
There is a position open for
assistant varsity manager and
freshman manager of the Mich-
igan track team. All those in-
terested are asked to call Mar-
vin Freedman at NO 2-4589.
finished eighth in the finals after
placing sixth in the preliminaries.
Farley led the eight qualifiers
for the finals yesterday with a
17:17.8 time in this metric mile
event. The eight finalists will
compete in the finals today for
three, places on the U.S. Olympic
team.
Roy Saari, who already has
earned Olympic swimming berths
in two events, was fourth with a
17:25.7 time. John Nelson, an
Olympic team member in the 400-

meter freestyle, was
Farley with a 17:19.5
Wall of Santa Clara,

third in 17:20.3.
Farley is a veteran of the 1963
Pan-American Games. As a sopho-
more last spring, Farley tied a
Big Ten record in the 1650-meter
freestyle and set a record in the
500-meter freestyle in winning
those events at the Big Ten Meet.
The listed world record in the
1500 is held by Saari at 17:05.5.
It has since been bettered by Aus-
tralia's Murray Rose with a time
of 17:01.8 but Rose apparently
isn't eligible to compete in the
Games.
Bartsch, a 1963 Pan-American
Games gold medalist, 1963 NCAA
champion, and 1964 NAAU indoor
backstroke champion, failed to
make the finals. But with Kin-
gery making the finals, the Wol.
verines should have one of the
best one-two combinations in the
backstroke of any team in the
country.
Gary Dilley, a 19-year-old Mich-
igan State sophomore who never
had won a national title, surged
from behind in the closing strokes
and won the backstroke event.
The 6-foot-1, 165-pounder from
Huntington, Ind., scored by about
two feet over Jed Graef, 6-foot-6

second to,
time. Mikef
Calif., was

Princeton graduate from Verona,
N.J. Bob Bennett, 1960 Olympian
from the Los Angeles A.C., was
third, earning a spot on the
Tokyo-bound team.
Dilley was timed in 2:12.0 in
the 50-meter Astoria Pool, much
slower than the world record of

2:10.9 held by Tom Stock of Au-
rora, Ill., who failed to make the
eight-man final. Stock just failed,
to qualify with 2:16.9. Graef's
time was 2:12.7 and Bennett's
2:12.8.
Pete Hammer of Bloomington,
Ind., who topped the morning

qualifiers on a bright, sunny day,
with 2:14.0, was fourth in 2:13.7.
Thompson Mann of Chesapeake,
Va., was fifth in 2:14.2; Dick Mc-
Geagh of Glendale, Calif., co-
holder .of the world mark for 100
meters, sixth in- 2:15.1; Navy Lt.
Richard Beaver was seventh in
2:15.3.
Mann led from the start to the
150-meter mark, with Graef one
or two yards behind. In thd final
50 to the wall, Dilley opened up
with a tremendous burst and
spurted past Mann, whos faded,.
and Graef.
Dilley said he never finished
better than sixth ins a national
meet but said he had been confi-
dent he would make the, first
three.
In the women's events, Sharon
Stouder, 15-year-old swimming
streak from Glendora, Calif.,
broke the listed world record again

for the women's 100-meter
fly and became the first
winner of the U.S. Olympic
Her time'was 1:05.7.
The young blonde won t
meter freestyle final Sa
eclipsing the listed Ax
record.
Second in the butterf
Kathy Ellis of Indianap
1:06.0 and third was Doi
Varona of Santa Clara, C
1:06.4.
The listed world record o:
by Holland's Ada Kok ha
beaten since by the Dut
with a 1:05.1 and by Miss
with a 1:05.4.
Miss de Varona, who s
he'r own world record in t
meter individual medley, ar
Ellis, second in the 10(
freestyle, joined Miss Stoi
clinching spots on the
bound team.

Among those enthusiasts most
enthralled are some of those with
the most inquiring minds, thus
*completely, blasting that theory
that a risbee is a detriment to
the educated, or that all Frisbee
players are dumb athletes. Ex-
ample, one Robert Doree, a junior
hailing from Midland:

rimester Effects
'IM Sports Schedule

Rent a TV this Fal
NEW 19" G.E. PORTABL
only $10.00 per month
FREE DELIVERY & SERVICE
TV set on display at Follett's Bookstore
Call NEJAC TV 2enta-7
phone. NO 2-5671'

MSU co-ed with Frisbee

"Why did they call it a Frisbee',
queries Bob, scratching his right forehand with the crook of his left
index finger. Then, as with greater insight into this new problem,
"Why didn't they call, it'a Malcom, or a Sydney, or a Ralph?" That's
a good question, Bob.
But the best question was answered by MSU Dean of Students
John Fuzak. What next after the Frisbee? "Maybe yo-yos." Could be.
* * * *
Elsewhere in the wonderful world of sport this summer, ex-
Michigan tackle Tom Keating made a big hit with the Buffalo Bills
of the American Football League when he almost blasted St. Louis
Cardinal guard Ken Gray's head off in the opening scrimmage of
the season. Keating, who may be in line for a starting defensive
end post after his brilliant fisticuff debut, laughed when asked
about the fight which broke out during the scrimmage against the
Cardinals. Hah, hah.
"Keating beat the hell out of Gray," smiled fellow Bills rookie
Hatch Rlosdahl, formerly of Penn .State fame. "Ring Magazine
should have covered that scrimmage."
"It started when I rushed the passer the play before," said
Keating. "Ankerson (Jack Ankerson, rookie quarterback) had the
ball on his hip, and I went for it. I guess I hit him when.I did.
"The next play Gray grabbed my face mask and almost tore
my head off. So I swung at him and he swung at me."
Keating and Rosdahl agreed that the Cardinals were stronger
than the NFL champion Chicago Bears they had bumped face masks
with in the All-Star game. Both Keating and fellow ex-Wolverine
guard Joe O'Donnell saw considerable action in the game.
*4*4X R1.I iiXJLYY jIYXLYYYYYYYi

By CHUCK VETZNER
The trimester, which has- al-
ready effected Michigan's inter-
collegiate sports, is now making
its presence felt on the intramural
level.
Softball and tennis, tradition-
ally spring sports, will open this
year's IM competition. They can't

their "A" and "B" championships,
respectively.
The other divisions-residence
hall, faculty, independent, gradu-
ate and the newly expanded North
Campus league-will begin play a
few days later.
A new addition to the IM cal-
endar, an all campus singles ten-
nis tournament will begin the

MICHIGAN'S BILL FARLEY yesterday led eight qualifiers into
the finals of the 1500-meter freestyle event with a 17:17.8 clock-
ing at the U.S. Olympic trials in New York. The Wolverine junior's
time, however, was well off the world record of 17:05.5 held by
Roy Saari who finished fourth.

.4

Ex-Wolverine

s an lk

atI Ter-h

New Shipments of

middle of the month.
Judo Club Tonight a meeting of athletic George Mans, 1961 Wolverine
The U of M Judo Club will managers of competing teams will football captain, has joined the
hold its first fall meeting '1be held to discuss arrangement's
Thursday, September 3, 7:30 for the coming year. All faculty coaching staff at Michigan Tech.
P.m., at the Intramural Bldg. members and independent stu- He will be an assistant football
Classes tw 11 be held for those dents planning to enter teams in
interested who have no experi- softball should choose and ath- coach this fall. Mans' other du-
ence, as well as instructions for letic manager as soon as possible. ties will include being head wres-
those with some proficiency. If the manager can not attend tling coach and assistant director
tonight's meeting he should con- of intramural athletics.
be played in the spring this year tact Earl Riskey at the IM Bldg.
because the second semester ends The building is open Monday Mans led the '61 squad to a
so early. through Friday from 8 a.m. to 7'6-3 record. After graduation he
The social fraternities will start p.m. helped coach the Michigan
their softball schedule September Beginning September 11, it will
8, when Delta Tau Delta and Sig- be open every Friday evening from freshman team and last season
ma Alpha Mu will try to defend 3 7 to 10 for co-ed recreation. was an assistant coach at Eastern
1000 to 2000 WORDS AR INU
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION

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FRIDAY, SEPT. 4

3:00-5:30
Leogue Mall

' T
PUS GI
Swing with.....
*.THE DARTS
*THE MARKSMEN .
* DANCE CONTEST
(PRIZES)
ague Social Committee

F

You can read 150-200 pages on hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to read DOWN the paged comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a
minute. And retention is excellent. This is not a skimming method; you definitely read every
word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased. Consider what
this reading ability will enable you to accomplish-not only in your required reading but also
in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READING
method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment.
A Tuesday evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught, adjacent to the
University of Michigan campus beginning on September 29. It's an experience to be able to
read a book in one sitting and see it as a whole.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public demonstration of the ACCELERATED READING
method and see it applied.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the Michigan Student Union on:
THURSDAY, Sept. 10 at 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 at 7:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 at 7:30 P.M.
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING, INC.
151 East 62nd St. New York 21, N.Y.

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
State St. Bob Graham, Mgr.

322 So.

RECEIVING A DEGREE?

Sponsored by:

Lec

B.A.? B.S.? B.B.A.

M.A.?M.D.? L.L.D.? P.H.D?

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;:

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IN DECEMBER?

IN MAY?

IN AUGUST?

The

Ca h

YOUR YEARBOOK!!!
SCOLOR SECTION
'GROUP SHOT SUPPLEMENT
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FRESHMEN

YOUR PICTURE BELONGS
IN YOUR YEARBOOK!
BUT IT WILL GET THERE ONLY IF YOU MAKE A SITTING
APPOINTMENT NOW!

For the best football seats

the

Wolverine Spirit Club,

$5.00 NOW!!
BUT THE PRICE WILL BE GOING UP.

announces

'I

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* OUR PHOTOGRAPHERS WILL TAKE PICTURES
ONLY DURING SEPTEMBER.
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ON THE DIAG OR AT THE CASHIER'S
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BUILDING.
$2.00 SITTING FEE PAYABLE AS YOU MAKE

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IGANENSIAN. We cannot bill you later. A receipt
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Membership available Tues., Wed., Sept. 1 & 2
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Mary Markley, South Quad

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