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August 28, 1964 - Image 19

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 196

THE MICHIGAN 1lATi v'

FRIDAY AUGUS:28, 964ass MwCIr i l 1nuw ra,. artaau 1

Schools,
More Legislative C
S S eC e
O tat Colleges

In a trend opposed by many col-
lege administrators and faculties,
state legislatures are beginning to
supervise growing public institu-
tions of higher education more
closely, the Wall Street Journal
observed recently.
Ohio is the latest state to im-
pose such supervision. John D.
Millet, formerly president of Ohio's
Miami University, was recently.
appointed chancellor of a nine-
man Board of Regents created by
the Ohio Legislature last year to
coordinate further growth of the
two junior colleges, three munici-
pal universities and six state col-
leges and universities which re-
ceive state funds.
Within the last five ears, Cali-
fornia, Pennsylvania, Utah, Ar-
kansas, South Carolina, Missouri
and Illinois have made steps in
this direction. And pressure to
follow suit exists in other states

where there is mi
school.'
Texas
Texas is cons
ing a board inte:
lic-supported ins
er education fro:
each other for f
ing their efficien
dundant curricul
Many state co
sities have rece
for< a long time
direct supervisio:
stitutions are pu
ent boards of tri
who are often e
partisan basis.
Most faculty r
trators and trus
dependence of po
Clipping
"A distant a
reaucracy supe:
university's gove

co-Ordination
It1 power to veto its planning and to professional fields between them
/o ti TO revise its budgets inevitably clips and present a unified front to the
the university's wings, destroys its legislature.
maneuverability and blocks its vi- Nowhere is competition more
een sion," Prof. M. M. Chambers of evident than in Michigan. Those
Indiana University said recently. who advocate state-wide coordina-
He is an authority on statewide tion contend that this fierce com-
ore than one state coordination and a former visit- petition ; among the University,
ing professor at the University. Michigan State University and
s Board One reason leading states to im- Wayne State University for ex-
pose tighter control is the realiza- pansion funds results in duplica-
idering establish- tion of the future burdens they tion.
nded to keep pub- Will have to carry. State schools For instance, WSU and the Uni-
stitutions of high- in the next decade will have to versity, which both have medical
m, competing with absorb much of the increase; en- schools, recently claimed MSU
unds and improv- rollment is expected to double in was trying to get a medical school
icy by avoiding re- that time. for itself when its established a
lums. two-year medical program. They
The Ohio board and other such stated further funds could best
lleges and univer- coordinating groups are concernedstedfrhrunscldbt
ived state money wcit instiutioneined be used to expand their own
with which institutions will be schools
without suffering allowed to offer graduate studies. s. Branches to Titles
n. Instead, the in Although these programs are ex- MSU and the University have
t under independ- pensive, they bring prestige to the locked horns over just about every
ustees or regents, school. Millet reports that there is possible issue, ranging from which
elected on a non- already some opposition to such school should be allowed to have
adminis restrictions from trustees and fac- a branch college to which should
nem bers, thd in- ulty members. bear the proud title of university.
tees prize this California Coordinating Council When the new state constitu-
)lticl ontrol.
Its Wings California's Coordinating Coun- tion was being written three years
dministrative bu- cil for Higher Education is con- ago, more central control seemed
rimposed over a sidered a good compromise be- likely. But a compromise between
rning board with tween centralized and decentraliz- pro- and anti-coordination forces
ed control. It was created in 1960 resulted.
* when the state laid out its master Decentralization w a s achieved
IS plan for higher education. When four smaller schools, former-
ItILosititthe uli en ly controlled by the state board
It consists of three public mem- of education, were made equal in
bers, three representatives from autonomy to the six other state
5, stem ,each of the types of institutions- colleges and universities.
junior colleges, state colleges and At the same time, a new elec-
the University of California--and tive board of education will have
e subservience to three representatives of private in- the power to plan and coordinate
s, and it encour- o allnpublic education, beginning in
Although the council is tech- January.
e in the number nically only advisory, its power is But this power was diluted by
increasing because most members a provision stating it "shall not
ie Education Min- of the legislature rely on its advice. limit the power of the boards of
ggested that there How to Avoid Control institutions of higher education
universities, with Some states have avoided such . . . to supervise their respective
r - competitiveness' control from coordinating bodies institutions and control and direct
standards. by voluntary coordination. Purdue the expenditure of the institution's
and Indiana University divide funds."

.i
I
i. 3
1
i

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E

I

Japanese Governmei

Postwar, Education ':C
TOKYO-A government survey former complet
on Japan's passion for higher edu- professors' views
cation has severely criticized the aged an increas
postwar educational system., of universities.
It held that the system had I The tone of th

turned out a generation of mop-
haired young men and women
able to discuss abstruse philos-
ophies in dimly lit coffee shops,
but poorly qualified to contribute
to the country's industrial base.
Reporting on the state of Ja-
pan's 591 colleges and universi-
ties, the Ministry of Education said
that standards generally had drop-
ped "far below" the level before
World War II. The study found
too much uniformity in the upper
schools and neglect of the "char-
acter-building" aspect of educa-
tion.
It contended that students, in
general were incapable of philo-
sophical and systematic thinking."
Open Discussion Enforced
The present system was inaugur-
ated 15 years ago, under the direc-
tion of American occupation au-
thorities. The occupation enforced
open discussion in place of the

istry's report su
were too many
consequent over
and a decline in
. i :1TP d t lai

ouaens ast, year numbered
760,000, or 10.7 per cent of the
population of university age, the
survey noted..
'A notable change in recent
years, according to the report has
been the increase in women's col-
lege enrollment from a small num-
ber before the war to 78,000 In
1963. Most of the ;women are in
two-year colleges established after
the war, and are preparing for of-
fice work.
More than 23 per cent of high
school graduates in Japan went on
to higher institutions in 1964, the
report stated. Japan is now said
to rank third in the world, after
the United States and the Soviet
Union, in the. ratio of students to
entire college-age population.
Copyright, 1964, The New York Times

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edit staff.

IKeci and se Te M'ic hi anDail

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_ _

GENERATION

E

POET

SERIES

GENERATION, published at the University of Michigan
for fifteen years, presents a four-volume series of contempor-
ary poets. These young poets of the University have published
widely in literary magazines, but have not, as yet, had their
poetry collected.
The hard-cover volumes .are being offered as a series at pre-
publication price: CHARTER SUBSCRIPTION $5.00.

Stevenson has received a Major Hopwood Award and her
poems have appeared 'in Poetry, The Paris Review and The
Massachusetts Review.
Anne Stevenson's poems, which happen to fall into a variety
of shapes, are achievements in which the angle of vision is
particularly distinct. It is very much her own. Reading her,
one is seldom if ever reminded of any other poets.

VOLUME I. AND IN HIM, TOO; IN US by
SKONSTANT INOS LARDAS,
will be released October 19, 1964. This volulme is selected
and introduced by AUSTIN WARREN. Mr. Lardas received
a major Hopwood Award, an Atlantic Monthly "First" a
University of Michigan Bainne-Swigget Poetry Award, and
has been included in the Borestone Mountain Poetry Award
Anthology, Best Poe-ms of 1962 & Best Poems of 1963. His
work has appeared in Accent, Harper's Bazaar, Dalhousie Re-
view, Folio, The Literary Review and The Prairie Schooner.
His metaphysics is that of the pre-Socratic philosophers, with
that special Greek continuity which combines the most ar-
chaic Hellenic thought about, water, fire, and family with the
most traditional ind. yet speculative form of Christian
thought-that of ,Hellenic Orthodoxy. It is true-perhaps
even great--poetry.
AUSTIN WARREN
Professor of English and Comparative Literature
The University of Michigan
He does remarkable things with words-new words, words
that are sounds with senses, old words made new, a dazzling
performance.
LOUIS UNT ERMEY ER
Library of Congress Poetry Consultant k

There are pleasures and alarms to be found in this book... .
A very few .of the poems have the memorable quality of par-
ticular nightmares remembered.
X. J. KENNEDY
Professor of English & Lamont Poetry Prize Winner
Tufts University r
VOLUME i1. POEMS by STEVE BRONSON,
will be released March, 1965. Mr. Bronson's poems
have appeared in The Paris Review, Arbor, and The Massa-
chusetts Review.
9 VOLUME IV. POEMS by NANCY WILLARD,
will be released May, 1965. This volume is selected
and introduced by Radcliffe Squires. Miss Willard has re-
ceived numerous Hopwood Awards at the University.
GENERATION NEW POET SERIES
Is being offered at a near-cost pre-publication price in order
to obtain as wide an audience of interested readers as possible.
This low price, a CHARTER SUBSCRIPTION, allows those
interested in contemparory poetry to view the entire series.
The four volumes are hard-bound, measuring 6 x 9 inches,
60-80 pages in length, and printed on high quality paper.

OR MAIL/BRING THIS FORM TO GENERATION - 420 Maynard - Ann Arbor

I wish a CHARTER SUBSCRIPTION to-the NEW POET SERIES. I understand that I will be

I

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