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August 28, 1964 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-08-28

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FRIAY. AUGUST2. 19

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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1' V a~a a, n,.S v X7 40, 100

Welcome to Sardine Suite

CORE Hits ADDRESS FRESHMEN:

777-

{

Arbordale

LSA Sp(

By ROGER RAPOPORT
Jennifer Cochran, '67, applied
for a single room this year. She
was assigned to one with 50 oth-
er girls.
She is one of 460 students cur-f
rently making the best of tempor-
ary housing that can be found in
almost every residence hall onj
campus.
Never before has the University
placed such a large number of,
freshmen and transfer studentsj
into temporary facilities.
They are crammed into recrea-
tion rooms, sun rooms, study halls,

and even a library.
In West Quadrangle, about 25
men are packed so tightly into a
recreation room that there is les,
than two 'feet between beds. All
are living out of their suitcases;
no closet space is provided.
Just in Case
At Stockwell, small groups are
placed into sun rooms and iron-
ing rooms stand ready in case of
additional overflow.
A library is the temporary home
for one group of Couzens girls.
Ironically, one tenporary tenant,
Susan Kasakoff, '66, reports that
all the book shelves are locked.

Late Sumer Admissions
Create Crowded Conditions

(Continued from Page 1)
Spurr explained that "the Univer-
sity's admissions policy of accept-
ing all qualified in-state appli-
cants forced the school to take
several hundred qualified students
this summer. Many had been re-
jected at other schools, mostly
those in the Ivy League."
The hordes of freshmen result
from World War II babies coming
of college age. Tentative enroll-
ment -projections have forecast a
1975 student body of 47,000, near-
ly double the 29,000 who will en-
roll this fall.
As early as last 'spring, the
dormitory crowding 'problem was
envisioned by Haun, the housing
director. "Every potential dormi-
tory student was notified that his"
room might be subject to the
addition of another person. We
let the student know this before,
he signed his housing contract,"
Haun said.
But despite the planning and
expectations, the University has
found itself unprepared for the
freshman onslaught this week.
Some administrators disagreed asl
to whether the confusion was
borne of the 500 person freshman
increase in general or just the'

unexpected extra summer appli-
cants.
Many saw potential danger sig-
nals for education at the Univer-
sity if growth cannot be con-
trolled. Dean Anderson of fresh-
man-sophomore counselling found
it "extremely serious" that courses
are closing a day ahead of last
year's t i m e t a b 1 e, particularly
courses in humanities.
Haun bemoaned the position of
the housing office whereby "we
have to either house these stu-
dents or tell them they can't come
here. And we 'certainly can't do
that." He noted that in some peak
periods during tbe early libs
students remained in temporary
quarters for an entire semester.
"We hope to start moving these
students out this week," he said.
And one unidentified official
worried about the subtle erosion
in education caused by over-ex-
panding sections and forcing in-
structors to carry more students.
"These are subtle processes which
undermine education," he explain-
ed. "But they will not show up
in the counselling officef or the
records since the classes aren't
officially closed. These problems
only come out in the classrOom."

The largest single temporary
unit is the ninth floor study hall E victions" By BRUCE BIGELOW
of South Quad, where about 80 In an address yesterday, Dean
stuents i .he ve varied re- (Continued from Page 1) William Haber of the literary col-
ai ttr '.lege outlined the objectives and
Barbara Gordon, '66, says she was charged with racial discrim- expectations of the University for
is meeting a lot of people and ination under Ann Arbor's fair its new students.
really doesn't mind it. "I'd hate housing ordinance.
to spend a year here, thought," Any Organization Dean Haber's speech was one
she adds. Hubble asserted that he "didn't of four presented at Hill Aud. as
At Couzens, Nancy Bronkema, care what organization the ten- part of the University's orienta-
'67, refers to her quarters as the ants belonged to. Anyone can be- tion program.
"sardine suite." long to anything he wants - I "The University," he said, "of-
Barracks have no gripe with them." fers the students an atmosphere
Kim Stuart, '68, of West Quad According to Mrs. Berla, Jonef rich in intellectual opportunity.
recently finished a tour of duty in moved out of the apartment last Such an atmosphere provides the
the Army and says, "This place is Sunday. On the advice of an at- freedom for the student to ab-
just like an Army barracks, only torney, he posted a notice on his sorb and enrich his understand-
we have to pay for the privilege." door that he still retained legal ing of life if he so desires."
In reality, however, the facilities occupancy of the room. At the D
are more like Navy barracks, as all same time, he placed several CORE Dean Haber stressed the fact
the bunk beds at South Quad- signs in the windows of the apart- ,that the choice of accepting or re-
rangle, for example, are Navy sur- ment. jecting the resources of the Uni-
plus. And, as one co-ed quipped, Hubble is reported to have torn versity is entirely up to the stu-
"There's a girl in every square down the legal occupancy sign on dent. Likewise, the degree to
inch." the door, entered the apartment_ which the student desires to in-
Undergraduate advisor Claire even though Jones had left a rela- volve himself in personal, social
Gentile, '66, who is helping to su- tive to watch over the rooms-and and intellectual transactions is up
pervise the South Quad "pent- tore up the signs in the windows. to him.B
house," says the girls have been These charges, too, are lies, Hub- Broad, Inclusive
cooperative and their only real ble declared. The University's purpose, he
problem is lack of a telephone. Damage Deposits continued, is to make as broad.
Temporary? Mrs. Berla further claimed that and inclusive an offering as pos-
How long will students be in Hubble had refused to return dam- sible; the student needs only ini-
temporary quarters? age deposits to Jones and Grey tiative to become a recipient.
The final result is contingent and that Jones has considered
upn the& number of students who court action to recover the money eI " grea poion of thehUni-
don'th w up this year, and upon The lease provides that deposits versity's offering lies in theham of fac-
the amoun of time itd witake to cannot be0 returned until th ex of tes fgact-h cnvrses," Dfac-
convert singles into doubles and' piration. of the lease," Hubble ulties of great universities," Dean
doubles into triples. countered. When the lease termin- Haber said. "Their offering is the
The uncertainty is troubling, ates, "the deposits of Jones and challenge to grow by association
many of them. One asked, "Will Grey will be handled in the same with their community of schol-
we ever get out of here?" manner as others." ars.
The answer is in doubt. As Ken- Mrs. Berla added that Hubble Haber stressed as the ultimate
neth Glennrennie, '68, remarged had changed the locks on the door: objective the role which a college
from the confines of the West of the apartments, even though education should play in adjusting
Quad Adams recreation 'room, one of them still contained valu- the young person to his society.
"They could call it temporary all able equipment left there by the "All the facilities of the Univer-
year." owner." isity should be focused on the de-

intellectual attainment a m o n g
freshmen: "Sixty-two per cent of
this class was chosen from the up-
per 10 per cent of their prep or
high school classes."
Dean Robertson also pointed
to the size of the incoming class.
It will be the largest class in the
literary college to date, number-
ing approximately 2800.
Speaking on behalf of the stu-
dent body, Daily Editor H. Neil
Berkson, '64, stressed the import-
ance of a liberal arts education
within the literary college.
'Preparation for Life'
'"Despite the great dimensions
of the University," he said, "the

STARTING
TODAY
"The fun is
continuous
and
infectious!"
N.Y. Times

I'LOW JINKS AND
HIGH HEROICS!"
-Time Magazine
josep d. ean-Paul Belmondo
S Claudia Cardinale
in Philippe de Mm's
' A U EMA$ UCOE
AEMSASSY PICTURES RELEASE

DIAL
668-6416
"A beauty
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Herald-Tribune

I

lakers Preview Life ii College
velopment of an education which literary school is still the center Representing the faculty, Prof.
will enable the student to find his of liberal education. Its objectivE James N. Cather of the zoology
place as an effective member of is not a specified function, but department explained his own
society."'
Ot.sa preparation for life in society." view of what is expected of the
Others student.
The three other speakers echoed Berksin asked students to con-
Dean Haber's words of welcome-to sider taking courses in several un-: "Develop a breadth of interest
the incoming freshman classm related fields so as to broaden and curiosity, work daily for long-
a their education. In addition he range achievement, and use your
Associate Dean James Robert- stressed the importance of mean- faculty for guidance and informa-
son of the literary college spoke ingful discussions with members of tion," Prof. Cather said. "These
of bright prospects in the years the faculty. are the 'thou shalts'."
ahead, noting the high degree of- ___ ____ - --

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HEADQUARTERS for
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
OFFICE FURNITURE, TYPEWRITERS and FOUNTAIN PENS
SMITH-CORONA & OLYMPIA
TYPEWRITERS -
Portable
ALL MAKES, bought, sold,
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TERMS: We try to suit customer.
FOUNTAIN PENS all makes

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DIAL
662-6264

2nd Big
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Shows start at
1:00-3:00-5:00-
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MATINEE 75c
Evenings and
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Special GalaPremiere Performances! SEPTEMBER 3rd
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